Discussion:
Boris's bus related jinxes continue
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Roland Perry
2019-09-22 15:13:12 UTC
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Permalink
"One of Northern Ireland's biggest employers faces a crunch week as
Wrightbus, which employs 1,400 staff, attempts to stave off collapse by
securing a last-minute rescue deal.

Mounting financial problems at the Ballymena-based company have left it
looking for a buyer, with the Chinese engineering group Weichai and a
firm led by the JCB heir, Jo Bamford, understood to be the suitors in
talks. However, local MP Ian Paisley told the BBC on Friday he
understood talks with the two potential buyers had failed to reach a
conclusion."

<https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/sep/22/wrightbus-
riutemasters-last-minute-search-for-buyer-avoid-collapse>

[Love the Grauniad typo in the url!]
--
Roland Perry
Recliner
2019-09-22 15:21:18 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Roland Perry
"One of Northern Ireland's biggest employers faces a crunch week as
Wrightbus, which employs 1,400 staff, attempts to stave off collapse by
securing a last-minute rescue deal.
Mounting financial problems at the Ballymena-based company have left it
looking for a buyer, with the Chinese engineering group Weichai and a
firm led by the JCB heir, Jo Bamford, understood to be the suitors in
talks. However, local MP Ian Paisley told the BBC on Friday he
understood talks with the two potential buyers had failed to reach a
conclusion."
<https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/sep/22/wrightbus-
riutemasters-last-minute-search-for-buyer-avoid-collapse>
[Love the Grauniad typo in the url!]
See the previous thread on the same subject from five weeks ago.
Roland Perry
2019-09-22 15:48:44 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
"One of Northern Ireland's biggest employers faces a crunch week as
Wrightbus, which employs 1,400 staff, attempts to stave off collapse by
securing a last-minute rescue deal.
Mounting financial problems at the Ballymena-based company have left it
looking for a buyer, with the Chinese engineering group Weichai and a
firm led by the JCB heir, Jo Bamford, understood to be the suitors in
talks. However, local MP Ian Paisley told the BBC on Friday he
understood talks with the two potential buyers had failed to reach a
conclusion."
<https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/sep/22/wrightbus-
riutemasters-last-minute-search-for-buyer-avoid-collapse>
[Love the Grauniad typo in the url!]
See the previous thread on the same subject from five weeks ago.
Five weeks is a long time in politics (later today Thomas Cook might
find out that five days is, too)
--
Roland Perry
Recliner
2019-09-22 22:13:40 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
"One of Northern Ireland's biggest employers faces a crunch week as
Wrightbus, which employs 1,400 staff, attempts to stave off collapse by
securing a last-minute rescue deal.
Mounting financial problems at the Ballymena-based company have left it
looking for a buyer, with the Chinese engineering group Weichai and a
firm led by the JCB heir, Jo Bamford, understood to be the suitors in
talks. However, local MP Ian Paisley told the BBC on Friday he
understood talks with the two potential buyers had failed to reach a
conclusion."
<https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/sep/22/wrightbus-
riutemasters-last-minute-search-for-buyer-avoid-collapse>
[Love the Grauniad typo in the url!]
See the previous thread on the same subject from five weeks ago.
Five weeks is a long time in politics (later today Thomas Cook might
find out that five days is, too)
Indeed. Wright is probably right down on Boris's list of concerns, behind
Jennifer Arcuri, the Supreme Court verdict, the party conference, the EU
negotiations, the looming election, …
Roland Perry
2019-09-23 08:27:09 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
"One of Northern Ireland's biggest employers faces a crunch week as
Wrightbus, which employs 1,400 staff, attempts to stave off collapse by
securing a last-minute rescue deal.
Mounting financial problems at the Ballymena-based company have left it
looking for a buyer, with the Chinese engineering group Weichai and a
firm led by the JCB heir, Jo Bamford, understood to be the suitors in
talks. However, local MP Ian Paisley told the BBC on Friday he
understood talks with the two potential buyers had failed to reach a
conclusion."
<https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/sep/22/wrightbus-
riutemasters-last-minute-search-for-buyer-avoid-collapse>
[Love the Grauniad typo in the url!]
See the previous thread on the same subject from five weeks ago.
Five weeks is a long time in politics (later today Thomas Cook might
find out that five days is, too)
Indeed. Wright is probably right down on Boris's list of concerns, behind
Jennifer Arcuri, the Supreme Court verdict, the party conference, the EU
negotiations, the looming election,
I doubt he's worried very much (unless the factory is in a DUP area) but
it's simply anther example of Boris + Bus (be that painted-on-the-side
or painted-as-a-hobby, as well as Roastmaster) looks like a fatal
combination.
--
Roland Perry
Marland
2019-09-23 09:16:29 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Indeed. Wright is probably right down on Boris's list of concerns, behind
Jennifer Arcuri, the Supreme Court verdict, the party conference, the EU
negotiations, the looming election,
I doubt he's worried very much (unless the factory is in a DUP area) but
it's simply anther example of Boris + Bus (be that painted-on-the-side
or painted-as-a-hobby, as well as Roastmaster) looks like a fatal
combination.
When he said he painted model buses as a hobby I still haven’t decided if
he was telling the truth ( is he capable?) or was just having a joke at the
expense of those who often refer to that campaign bus with the somewhat
misleading slogan on the side.

As for all those other problems taken in isolation each one could be a
niggle but when there are so many at once none of them can be concentrated
on so he will probably ride them out relying on the “cant see the wood for
trees “ principle.

GH
Recliner
2019-09-23 09:58:16 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Marland
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Indeed. Wright is probably right down on Boris's list of concerns, behind
Jennifer Arcuri, the Supreme Court verdict, the party conference, the EU
negotiations, the looming election,
I doubt he's worried very much (unless the factory is in a DUP area) but
it's simply anther example of Boris + Bus (be that painted-on-the-side
or painted-as-a-hobby, as well as Roastmaster) looks like a fatal
combination.
When he said he painted model buses as a hobby I still haven’t decided if
he was telling the truth ( is he capable?) or was just having a joke at the
expense of those who often refer to that campaign bus with the somewhat
misleading slogan on the side.
It's highly unlikely to be true. So it was either a joke, or an attempt to
remind people of his greatest triumph as mayor.
Post by Marland
As for all those other problems taken in isolation each one could be a
niggle but when there are so many at once none of them can be concentrated
on so he will probably ride them out relying on the “cant see the wood for
trees “ principle.
I think Cummings and Gove do most of his thinking for him. Boris just has
to choose between their often conflicting advice.
MissRiaElaine
2019-09-23 13:03:38 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Marland
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Indeed. Wright is probably right down on Boris's list of concerns, behind
Jennifer Arcuri, the Supreme Court verdict, the party conference, the EU
negotiations, the looming election,
I doubt he's worried very much (unless the factory is in a DUP area) but
it's simply anther example of Boris + Bus (be that painted-on-the-side
or painted-as-a-hobby, as well as Roastmaster) looks like a fatal
combination.
When he said he painted model buses as a hobby I still haven’t decided if
he was telling the truth ( is he capable?) or was just having a joke at the
expense of those who often refer to that campaign bus with the somewhat
misleading slogan on the side.
Misleading slogan or not, it was a coach, not a bus. When did it ever
stop to pick up fare-paying passengers..?
--
Ria in Aberdeen

[Send address is invalid, use sipsoup at gmail dot com to reply direct]
Roland Perry
2019-09-23 13:43:20 UTC
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Post by MissRiaElaine
Post by Marland
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Indeed. Wright is probably right down on Boris's list of concerns, behind
Jennifer Arcuri, the Supreme Court verdict, the party conference, the EU
negotiations, the looming election,
I doubt he's worried very much (unless the factory is in a DUP area) but
it's simply anther example of Boris + Bus (be that painted-on-the-side
or painted-as-a-hobby, as well as Roastmaster) looks like a fatal
combination.
When he said he painted model buses as a hobby I still haven’t decided if
he was telling the truth ( is he capable?) or was just having a joke at the
expense of those who often refer to that campaign bus with the somewhat
misleading slogan on the side.
Misleading slogan or not, it was a coach, not a bus. When did it ever
stop to pick up fare-paying passengers..?
It was almost universally referred to as "a bus".
--
Roland Perry
MissRiaElaine
2019-09-23 14:37:08 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Roland Perry
Post by MissRiaElaine
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Indeed. Wright is probably right down on Boris's list of concerns, behind
Jennifer Arcuri, the Supreme Court verdict, the party conference, the EU
negotiations, the looming election,
I doubt he's worried very much (unless the factory is in a DUP area) but
it's simply anther example of Boris + Bus (be that painted-on-the-side
or painted-as-a-hobby, as well as Roastmaster) looks like a fatal
combination.
 When he said he painted model buses as a hobby I still haven’t
decided if
he was telling the truth ( is he capable?) or was just having a joke at the
expense of those who often refer to that campaign bus with the somewhat
misleading slogan on the side.
Misleading slogan or not, it was a coach, not a bus. When did it ever
stop to pick up fare-paying passengers..?
It was almost universally referred to as "a bus".
Wrongly.
--
Ria in Aberdeen

[Send address is invalid, use sipsoup at gmail dot com to reply direct]
Roland Perry
2019-09-23 14:50:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MissRiaElaine
Post by Roland Perry
Post by MissRiaElaine
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Indeed. Wright is probably right down on Boris's list of
concerns, behind
Jennifer Arcuri, the Supreme Court verdict, the party conference, the EU
negotiations, the looming election,
I doubt he's worried very much (unless the factory is in a DUP
area) but
it's simply anther example of Boris + Bus (be that painted-on-the-side
or painted-as-a-hobby, as well as Roastmaster) looks like a fatal
combination.
 When he said he painted model buses as a hobby I still haven’t
decided if
he was telling the truth ( is he capable?) or was just having a
joke at the
expense of those who often refer to that campaign bus with the somewhat
misleading slogan on the side.
Misleading slogan or not, it was a coach, not a bus. When did it
ever stop to pick up fare-paying passengers..?
It was almost universally referred to as "a bus".
Wrongly.
Doesn't matter. It's a slogan. Like "battle bus".
--
Roland Perry
MissRiaElaine
2019-09-23 16:44:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roland Perry
Post by MissRiaElaine
Post by MissRiaElaine
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Indeed. Wright is probably right down on Boris's list of
concerns,  behind
Jennifer Arcuri, the Supreme Court verdict, the party conference, the EU
negotiations, the looming election,
I doubt he's worried very much (unless the factory is in a DUP
area)  but
it's simply anther example of Boris + Bus (be that
painted-on-the-side
or painted-as-a-hobby, as well as Roastmaster) looks like a fatal
combination.
 When he said he painted model buses as a hobby I still haven’t
decided if
he was telling the truth ( is he capable?) or was just having a
joke  at the
expense of those who often refer to that campaign bus with the somewhat
misleading slogan on the side.
Misleading slogan or not, it was a coach, not a bus. When did it
ever  stop to pick up fare-paying passengers..?
 It was almost universally referred to as "a bus".
Wrongly.
Doesn't matter. It's a slogan. Like "battle bus".
It's still wrong.
--
Ria in Aberdeen

[Send address is invalid, use sipsoup at gmail dot com to reply direct]
Roland Perry
2019-09-23 17:47:26 UTC
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Post by MissRiaElaine
Post by Roland Perry
Post by MissRiaElaine
 It was almost universally referred to as "a bus".
Wrongly.
Doesn't matter. It's a slogan. Like "battle bus".
It's still wrong.
https://xkcd.com/386/
--
Roland Perry
Recliner
2019-09-23 15:05:26 UTC
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On Mon, 23 Sep 2019 15:37:08 +0100, MissRiaElaine
Post by MissRiaElaine
Post by Roland Perry
Post by MissRiaElaine
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Indeed. Wright is probably right down on Boris's list of concerns, behind
Jennifer Arcuri, the Supreme Court verdict, the party conference, the EU
negotiations, the looming election,
I doubt he's worried very much (unless the factory is in a DUP area) but
it's simply anther example of Boris + Bus (be that painted-on-the-side
or painted-as-a-hobby, as well as Roastmaster) looks like a fatal
combination.
 When he said he painted model buses as a hobby I still haven’t
decided if
he was telling the truth ( is he capable?) or was just having a joke at the
expense of those who often refer to that campaign bus with the somewhat
misleading slogan on the side.
Misleading slogan or not, it was a coach, not a bus. When did it ever
stop to pick up fare-paying passengers..?
It was almost universally referred to as "a bus".
Wrongly.
No, as previously discussed, all coaches are buses, but not all buses
are coaches.
Roland Perry
2019-09-23 15:22:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Recliner
Post by MissRiaElaine
Post by Roland Perry
Post by MissRiaElaine
Misleading slogan or not, it was a coach, not a bus. When did it ever
stop to pick up fare-paying passengers..?
It was almost universally referred to as "a bus".
Wrongly.
No, as previously discussed, all coaches are buses, but not all buses
are coaches.
I blame the black crows.
--
Roland Perry
tim...
2019-09-25 13:44:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MissRiaElaine
Post by Roland Perry
Post by MissRiaElaine
Post by Marland
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Indeed. Wright is probably right down on Boris's list of concerns, behind
Jennifer Arcuri, the Supreme Court verdict, the party conference, the EU
negotiations, the looming election,
I doubt he's worried very much (unless the factory is in a DUP area) but
it's simply anther example of Boris + Bus (be that painted-on-the-side
or painted-as-a-hobby, as well as Roastmaster) looks like a fatal
combination.
When he said he painted model buses as a hobby I still haven’t decided if
he was telling the truth ( is he capable?) or was just having a joke at the
expense of those who often refer to that campaign bus with the somewhat
misleading slogan on the side.
Misleading slogan or not, it was a coach, not a bus. When did it ever
stop to pick up fare-paying passengers..?
It was almost universally referred to as "a bus".
Wrongly.
and when did that stop newspapers perpetuating a theme

Don't they still write about "Road Tax"

tim
Marland
2019-09-23 14:49:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MissRiaElaine
Post by Marland
When he said he painted model buses as a hobby I still haven’t decided if
he was telling the truth ( is he capable?) or was just having a joke at the
expense of those who often refer to that campaign bus with the somewhat
misleading slogan on the side.
Misleading slogan or not, it was a coach, not a bus. When did it ever
stop to pick up fare-paying passengers..?
Well if you want to do silly nitpicking about a vehicle that was and still
is referred to by the general public as a bus ,even if that does offend the
sensibilities of a long retired employee of a public transport organisation
then you are several of decades too late and quite frankly you are so out
of step with most people on this
that your view can be discounted as not supported enough to be worth taking
any notice of.

The use of “Bus” for such vehicles used on Political Campaigns goes way
back when someone coined the slogan “ Battle Bus “ which is more
alliterative than Battle Coach.

Lots of instances in this BBC item on them.

Embattled buses - the ups and downs of an election staple

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-39907963

The photo on there of David Steel with the words “ Battle Bus “ as a legend
on the front is from the late 1970’s ,
I wonder if that was the first .
Blame him if you don’t like it.


GH
Recliner
2019-09-23 09:26:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
"One of Northern Ireland's biggest employers faces a crunch week as
Wrightbus, which employs 1,400 staff, attempts to stave off collapse by
securing a last-minute rescue deal.
Mounting financial problems at the Ballymena-based company have left it
looking for a buyer, with the Chinese engineering group Weichai and a
firm led by the JCB heir, Jo Bamford, understood to be the suitors in
talks. However, local MP Ian Paisley told the BBC on Friday he
understood talks with the two potential buyers had failed to reach a
conclusion."
<https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/sep/22/wrightbus-
riutemasters-last-minute-search-for-buyer-avoid-collapse>
[Love the Grauniad typo in the url!]
See the previous thread on the same subject from five weeks ago.
Five weeks is a long time in politics (later today Thomas Cook might
find out that five days is, too)
Indeed. Wright is probably right down on Boris's list of concerns, behind
Jennifer Arcuri, the Supreme Court verdict, the party conference, the EU
negotiations, the looming election,
I doubt he's worried very much (unless the factory is in a DUP area) but
it's simply anther example of Boris + Bus (be that painted-on-the-side
or painted-as-a-hobby, as well as Roastmaster) looks like a fatal
combination.
I'd love to see an example of his claimed painted-wine-box bus. I wonder if
he dreamed up that phoney hobby on the spot, or if his spin doctors had
carefully connected.
Recliner
2019-09-23 09:54:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
"One of Northern Ireland's biggest employers faces a crunch week as
Wrightbus, which employs 1,400 staff, attempts to stave off collapse by
securing a last-minute rescue deal.
Mounting financial problems at the Ballymena-based company have left it
looking for a buyer, with the Chinese engineering group Weichai and a
firm led by the JCB heir, Jo Bamford, understood to be the suitors in
talks. However, local MP Ian Paisley told the BBC on Friday he
understood talks with the two potential buyers had failed to reach a
conclusion."
<https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/sep/22/wrightbus-
riutemasters-last-minute-search-for-buyer-avoid-collapse>
[Love the Grauniad typo in the url!]
See the previous thread on the same subject from five weeks ago.
Five weeks is a long time in politics (later today Thomas Cook might
find out that five days is, too)
Indeed. Wright is probably right down on Boris's list of concerns, behind
Jennifer Arcuri, the Supreme Court verdict, the party conference, the EU
negotiations, the looming election,
I doubt he's worried very much (unless the factory is in a DUP area) but
it's simply anther example of Boris + Bus (be that painted-on-the-side
or painted-as-a-hobby, as well as Roastmaster) looks like a fatal
combination.
I'd love to see an example of his claimed painted-wine-box bus. I wonder if
he dreamed up that phoney hobby on the spot, or if his spin doctors had
carefully connected.
carefully confected it.
Peter Able
2019-09-23 14:58:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
"One of Northern Ireland's biggest employers faces a crunch week as
Wrightbus, which employs 1,400 staff, attempts to stave off collapse by
securing a last-minute rescue deal.
Mounting financial problems at the Ballymena-based company have left it
looking for a buyer, with the Chinese engineering group Weichai and a
firm led by the JCB heir, Jo Bamford, understood to be the suitors in
talks. However, local MP Ian Paisley told the BBC on Friday he
understood talks with the two potential buyers had failed to reach a
conclusion."
<https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/sep/22/wrightbus-
riutemasters-last-minute-search-for-buyer-avoid-collapse>
[Love the Grauniad typo in the url!]
See the previous thread on the same subject from five weeks ago.
Five weeks is a long time in politics (later today Thomas Cook might
find out that five days is, too)
Indeed. Wright is probably right down on Boris's list of concerns, behind
Jennifer Arcuri, the Supreme Court verdict, the party conference, the EU
negotiations, the looming election,
I doubt he's worried very much (unless the factory is in a DUP area) but
it's simply anther example of Boris + Bus (be that painted-on-the-side
or painted-as-a-hobby, as well as Roastmaster) looks like a fatal
combination.
I'd love to see an example of his claimed painted-wine-box bus. I wonder if
he dreamed up that phoney hobby on the spot, or if his spin doctors had
carefully connected.
carefully confected it.
How could anyone have really confected such a bizarre story, though, and
to what end? It reminds me of the time when Voice of Russia, during the
detention of Gorbachev, suddenly switched from normal programming to a
lengthy story about the jam roly-poly that ran away from the kitchen!

Mind-boggling.

PA
Recliner
2019-09-23 15:46:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Able
Post by Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
"One of Northern Ireland's biggest employers faces a crunch week as
Wrightbus, which employs 1,400 staff, attempts to stave off collapse by
securing a last-minute rescue deal.
Mounting financial problems at the Ballymena-based company have left it
looking for a buyer, with the Chinese engineering group Weichai and a
firm led by the JCB heir, Jo Bamford, understood to be the suitors in
talks. However, local MP Ian Paisley told the BBC on Friday he
understood talks with the two potential buyers had failed to reach a
conclusion."
<https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/sep/22/wrightbus-
riutemasters-last-minute-search-for-buyer-avoid-collapse>
[Love the Grauniad typo in the url!]
See the previous thread on the same subject from five weeks ago.
Five weeks is a long time in politics (later today Thomas Cook might
find out that five days is, too)
Indeed. Wright is probably right down on Boris's list of concerns, behind
Jennifer Arcuri, the Supreme Court verdict, the party conference, the EU
negotiations, the looming election,
I doubt he's worried very much (unless the factory is in a DUP area) but
it's simply anther example of Boris + Bus (be that painted-on-the-side
or painted-as-a-hobby, as well as Roastmaster) looks like a fatal
combination.
I'd love to see an example of his claimed painted-wine-box bus. I wonder if
he dreamed up that phoney hobby on the spot, or if his spin doctors had
carefully connected.
carefully confected it.
How could anyone have really confected such a bizarre story, though, and
to what end? It reminds me of the time when Voice of Russia, during the
detention of Gorbachev, suddenly switched from normal programming to a
lengthy story about the jam roly-poly that ran away from the kitchen!
Mind-boggling.
Purely as a distraction from difficult questions.
Peter Able
2019-09-23 16:04:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Recliner
Post by Peter Able
Post by Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
"One of Northern Ireland's biggest employers faces a crunch week as
Wrightbus, which employs 1,400 staff, attempts to stave off collapse by
securing a last-minute rescue deal.
Mounting financial problems at the Ballymena-based company have left it
looking for a buyer, with the Chinese engineering group Weichai and a
firm led by the JCB heir, Jo Bamford, understood to be the suitors in
talks. However, local MP Ian Paisley told the BBC on Friday he
understood talks with the two potential buyers had failed to reach a
conclusion."
<https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/sep/22/wrightbus-
riutemasters-last-minute-search-for-buyer-avoid-collapse>
[Love the Grauniad typo in the url!]
See the previous thread on the same subject from five weeks ago.
Five weeks is a long time in politics (later today Thomas Cook might
find out that five days is, too)
Indeed. Wright is probably right down on Boris's list of concerns, behind
Jennifer Arcuri, the Supreme Court verdict, the party conference, the EU
negotiations, the looming election,
I doubt he's worried very much (unless the factory is in a DUP area) but
it's simply anther example of Boris + Bus (be that painted-on-the-side
or painted-as-a-hobby, as well as Roastmaster) looks like a fatal
combination.
I'd love to see an example of his claimed painted-wine-box bus. I wonder if
he dreamed up that phoney hobby on the spot, or if his spin doctors had
carefully connected.
carefully confected it.
How could anyone have really confected such a bizarre story, though, and
to what end? It reminds me of the time when Voice of Russia, during the
detention of Gorbachev, suddenly switched from normal programming to a
lengthy story about the jam roly-poly that ran away from the kitchen!
Mind-boggling.
Purely as a distraction from difficult questions.
In both cases.
Roland Perry
2019-09-25 07:05:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roland Perry
"One of Northern Ireland's biggest employers faces a crunch week as
Wrightbus, which employs 1,400 staff, attempts to stave off collapse by
securing a last-minute rescue deal.
Mounting financial problems at the Ballymena-based company have left it
looking for a buyer, with the Chinese engineering group Weichai and a
firm led by the JCB heir, Jo Bamford, understood to be the suitors in
talks. However, local MP Ian Paisley told the BBC on Friday he
understood talks with the two potential buyers had failed to reach a
conclusion."
‘Administration now inevitable,’ says Paisley:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-49818156

A week to find a buyer. Probably this month's wages bill which has
pushed them over the edge.

In other news, Uber London given two months to prove it's fit and proper
for a new licence:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-49810049
--
Roland Perry
Recliner
2019-09-25 07:24:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Roland Perry
"One of Northern Ireland's biggest employers faces a crunch week as
Wrightbus, which employs 1,400 staff, attempts to stave off collapse by
securing a last-minute rescue deal.
Mounting financial problems at the Ballymena-based company have left it
looking for a buyer, with the Chinese engineering group Weichai and a
firm led by the JCB heir, Jo Bamford, understood to be the suitors in
talks. However, local MP Ian Paisley told the BBC on Friday he
understood talks with the two potential buyers had failed to reach a
conclusion."
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-49818156
A week to find a buyer. Probably this month's wages bill which has
pushed them over the edge.
I hadn't realised that the UK bus market was in such decline:

"Latest accounts show that the Wrightbus group lost £1.7m on a turnover of
£227m in 2017.

But its financial situation has deteriorated since then.

It made two rounds of redundancies last year with 95 jobs going in February
and June, which it said reflected continued low levels of demand for new
buses in the UK market.

The UK has traditionally been Wrightbus's biggest market but it has been
contracting for over two years.

Figures from the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) show
that in the second quarter of this year new bus and coach registrations are
down 30% compared to the same period last year.

That marks the tenth quarter in a row that new registrations have
declined."
Roland Perry
2019-09-25 08:42:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Roland Perry
"One of Northern Ireland's biggest employers faces a crunch week as
Wrightbus, which employs 1,400 staff, attempts to stave off collapse by
securing a last-minute rescue deal.
Mounting financial problems at the Ballymena-based company have left it
looking for a buyer, with the Chinese engineering group Weichai and a
firm led by the JCB heir, Jo Bamford, understood to be the suitors in
talks. However, local MP Ian Paisley told the BBC on Friday he
understood talks with the two potential buyers had failed to reach a
conclusion."
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-49818156
A week to find a buyer. Probably this month's wages bill which has
pushed them over the edge.
"Latest accounts show that the Wrightbus group lost £1.7m on a turnover of
£227m in 2017.
But its financial situation has deteriorated since then.
It made two rounds of redundancies last year with 95 jobs going in February
and June, which it said reflected continued low levels of demand for new
buses in the UK market.
The UK has traditionally been Wrightbus's biggest market but it has been
contracting for over two years.
Figures from the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) show
that in the second quarter of this year new bus and coach registrations are
down 30% compared to the same period last year.
That marks the tenth quarter in a row that new registrations have
declined."
We are on the verge of a recession, the future looks uncertain, and your
fleet is probably fully compliant with latest regs. Why as an operator
would you start buying new buses?

Of the bigger bus operators, only Go-Ahead are doing well, with both
First and Stagecoach in trouble.
--
Roland Perry
Recliner
2019-09-25 10:43:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Roland Perry
"One of Northern Ireland's biggest employers faces a crunch week as
Wrightbus, which employs 1,400 staff, attempts to stave off collapse by
securing a last-minute rescue deal.
Mounting financial problems at the Ballymena-based company have left it
looking for a buyer, with the Chinese engineering group Weichai and a
firm led by the JCB heir, Jo Bamford, understood to be the suitors in
talks. However, local MP Ian Paisley told the BBC on Friday he
understood talks with the two potential buyers had failed to reach a
conclusion."
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-49818156
A week to find a buyer. Probably this month's wages bill which has
pushed them over the edge.
"Latest accounts show that the Wrightbus group lost £1.7m on a turnover of
£227m in 2017.
But its financial situation has deteriorated since then.
It made two rounds of redundancies last year with 95 jobs going in February
and June, which it said reflected continued low levels of demand for new
buses in the UK market.
The UK has traditionally been Wrightbus's biggest market but it has been
contracting for over two years.
Figures from the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) show
that in the second quarter of this year new bus and coach registrations are
down 30% compared to the same period last year.
That marks the tenth quarter in a row that new registrations have
declined."
We are on the verge of a recession, the future looks uncertain, and your
fleet is probably fully compliant with latest regs. Why as an operator
would you start buying new buses?
Of the bigger bus operators, only Go-Ahead are doing well, with both
First and Stagecoach in trouble.
I suppose I'm biased by being in London, where there always seem to be
new buses
Roland Perry
2019-09-25 11:18:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Figures from the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) show
that in the second quarter of this year new bus and coach registrations are
down 30% compared to the same period last year.
That marks the tenth quarter in a row that new registrations have
declined."
We are on the verge of a recession, the future looks uncertain, and your
fleet is probably fully compliant with latest regs. Why as an operator
would you start buying new buses?
Of the bigger bus operators, only Go-Ahead are doing well, with both
First and Stagecoach in trouble.
I suppose I'm biased by being in London, where there always seem to be
new buses
The registrations are 'only' down 30%, not 100%.
--
Roland Perry
Recliner
2019-09-25 21:58:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Figures from the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) show
that in the second quarter of this year new bus and coach registrations are
down 30% compared to the same period last year.
That marks the tenth quarter in a row that new registrations have
declined."
We are on the verge of a recession, the future looks uncertain, and your
fleet is probably fully compliant with latest regs. Why as an operator
would you start buying new buses?
Of the bigger bus operators, only Go-Ahead are doing well, with both
First and Stagecoach in trouble.
I suppose I'm biased by being in London, where there always seem to be
new buses
The registrations are 'only' down 30%, not 100%.
It seems that Wrightbus had failed to take advantage of the switch to
battery buses, and had also donated over £16m — more than enough to keep
the business afloat — to the family church:

"The parent company of Wrights Group also donated more than £16.1m to
charity between 2012 and 2017. Those donations helped to fund the expansion
of Green Pastures, an influential evangelical church in Ballymena run by
Jeff Wright ."

<https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/sep/25/wrightbus-goes-into-administration-1400-jobs-routemaster-northern-ireland>

In an interview with The Irish Times in November 2017, pastor Jeff [Wright]
noted that Cornerstone “made God a shareholder in the business” as 26 per
cent of Wrights is owned by the evangelical trust.

Despite being primed to take over the bus builder, pastor Jeff told The
Irish Times he felt God had a new question for him. “Do you love me more
than these buses?’ I said, ‘yeah, I do’. So God said ‘I want you to feed my
lambs and take care of my sheep’.”

<https://www.irishtimes.com/business/manufacturing/wrightbus-donated-4m-to-christian-charities-in-2017-1.4030436>
tim...
2019-09-26 13:45:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Figures from the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) show
that in the second quarter of this year new bus and coach
registrations are
down 30% compared to the same period last year.
That marks the tenth quarter in a row that new registrations have
declined."
We are on the verge of a recession, the future looks uncertain, and your
fleet is probably fully compliant with latest regs. Why as an operator
would you start buying new buses?
Of the bigger bus operators, only Go-Ahead are doing well, with both
First and Stagecoach in trouble.
I suppose I'm biased by being in London, where there always seem to be
new buses
The registrations are 'only' down 30%, not 100%.
It seems that Wrightbus had failed to take advantage of the switch to
battery buses,
I'm not sure that "taking advantage of" is the right phase here

"investing tens of million in development" is what you really mean

But did they have that 10s of millions.

tim
Recliner
2019-09-26 14:18:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tim...
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Figures from the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) show
that in the second quarter of this year new bus and coach
registrations are
down 30% compared to the same period last year.
That marks the tenth quarter in a row that new registrations have
declined."
We are on the verge of a recession, the future looks uncertain, and your
fleet is probably fully compliant with latest regs. Why as an operator
would you start buying new buses?
Of the bigger bus operators, only Go-Ahead are doing well, with both
First and Stagecoach in trouble.
I suppose I'm biased by being in London, where there always seem to be
new buses
The registrations are 'only' down 30%, not 100%.
It seems that Wrightbus had failed to take advantage of the switch to
battery buses,
I'm not sure that "taking advantage of" is the right phase here
"investing tens of million in development" is what you really mean
But did they have that 10s of millions.
It seems Jeff Wright preferred to fund his church rather than his bus
business.
MissRiaElaine
2019-09-26 17:48:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Recliner
It seems Jeff Wright preferred to fund his church rather than his bus
business.
And to hell, as it were, with the employees.

Great British business at it's best. Never mind Brexit, this is the
reason we're the laughing stock of the world now.
--
Ria in Aberdeen

[Send address is invalid, use sipsoup at gmail dot com to reply direct]
Recliner
2019-09-26 20:21:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MissRiaElaine
Post by Recliner
It seems Jeff Wright preferred to fund his church rather than his bus
business.
And to hell, as it were, with the employees.
Yup
Post by MissRiaElaine
Great British business at it's best. Never mind Brexit, this is the
reason we're the laughing stock of the world now.
More like typical Ulster bigoted behaviour, much less likely to be
encountered in Britain.
Roland Perry
2019-09-30 11:22:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
And today Boris's latest idea is to spend (or is he expecting someone
else to spend) £220m on new buses (and all contactless payment) because
the Roastmaster was such a success, apparently.

And at least one town to be completely zero carbon. Ballemena, perhaps,
using the £50m to reopen the factory, there?
--
Roland Perry
David Cantrell
2019-10-01 09:50:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roland Perry
And today Boris's latest idea is to spend (or is he expecting someone
else to spend) ?220m on new buses (and all contactless payment) because
the Roastmaster was such a success, apparently.
I don't get this antipathy to the Boris buses. I'm a passenger,
frequently. They do their job well, combining the benefits of a normal
double decker with the one benefit of the bendy monstrosities - quick
boarding - without the humungous downsides of the bendies taking up too
much road space and blocking junctions.
--
David Cantrell | Reality Engineer, Ministry of Information

Eye have a spelling chequer / It came with my pea sea
It planely marques four my revue / Miss Steaks eye kin knot sea.
Eye strike a quay and type a word / And weight for it to say
Weather eye am wrong oar write / It shows me strait a weigh.
Recliner
2019-10-01 10:05:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Cantrell
Post by Roland Perry
And today Boris's latest idea is to spend (or is he expecting someone
else to spend) ?220m on new buses (and all contactless payment) because
the Roastmaster was such a success, apparently.
I don't get this antipathy to the Boris buses. I'm a passenger,
frequently. They do their job well, combining the benefits of a normal
double decker with the one benefit of the bendy monstrosities - quick
boarding - without the humungous downsides of the bendies taking up too
much road space and blocking junctions.
They're very heavy, which limits their capacity as does the rear platform
and second staircase, the hybrid system has never worked properly, perhaps
because of the very limited space for the power unit under the rear stairs,
like the bendies they have double the fare evasion of normal buses, and
they cost almost twice as much as a conventional double decker (£350k vs
£190k). They acquired their 'Roastmaster' nickname because their
air-cooling didn't work and they lacked ventilation, which had to be
retro-fitted.

So, we have a bus that's 84% more expensive, with less capacity, longer and
heavier than a normal double-decker, less comfortable, worse fuel
consumption and whose entire reason for existence, the open rear platform,
is not used. No wonder the hoped-for sale of the design to other cities
never happened.

It's truly a fitting metaphor for the Boris Johnson mayoralty.

And let's hope his Brexit deal isn't as bad as his bus.
Roland Perry
2019-10-01 11:17:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Recliner
Post by David Cantrell
Post by Roland Perry
And today Boris's latest idea is to spend (or is he expecting someone
else to spend) ?220m on new buses (and all contactless payment) because
the Roastmaster was such a success, apparently.
I don't get this antipathy to the Boris buses. I'm a passenger,
frequently. They do their job well, combining the benefits of a normal
double decker with the one benefit of the bendy monstrosities - quick
boarding - without the humungous downsides of the bendies taking up too
much road space and blocking junctions.
They're very heavy, which limits their capacity as does the rear platform
and second staircase, the hybrid system has never worked properly, perhaps
because of the very limited space for the power unit under the rear stairs,
like the bendies they have double the fare evasion of normal buses, and
they cost almost twice as much as a conventional double decker (£350k vs
£190k). They acquired their 'Roastmaster' nickname because their
air-cooling didn't work and they lacked ventilation, which had to be
retro-fitted.
So, we have a bus that's 84% more expensive, with less capacity, longer and
heavier than a normal double-decker, less comfortable, worse fuel
consumption and whose entire reason for existence, the open rear platform,
is not used. No wonder the hoped-for sale of the design to other cities
never happened.
It's truly a fitting metaphor for the Boris Johnson mayoralty.
And let's hope his Brexit deal isn't as bad as his bus.
He was wittering on about buses on BBC Breakfast again this morning.

Mentioned smartcards as one of the ways to drive up usage.

Now, what happened to this initiative:

<https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/12/06/commuters-get-smart-cards-tr
avel-across-country-2018-network/>

Every rail commuter will be able to use a pay-as-you-go smart
card to take them anywhere in the country, Chris Grayling says
today [December 2016].

Last time I looked, it wasn't 2018 any more. And while a very few
commuters can load season tickets onto smartcards, are there any at all
(outside of Oyster which already existed) doing PAYG? [Obviously he must
also have meant capped PAYG, or it makes no economic sense to the
traveller].

ps Has anyone with more stamina than I waded through yesterday's
announcements to identify which is the all-electric-bus town they
have in mind.

I'm reminded of Northstowe being Gordon Brown's first eco-town. Not
only is it not an eco-town, but they only started building ten years
after his announcement.

And in megaphone-policy-convergence, the local hospital has been on
its knees the last decade on account of the lack of predicted
additional demand from new town. Latest rumours are they are going
to close its A&E.

But hurrah, Northstowe did get its guided buses, for no-one to need
to use. And their fancy smart-ticketing scheme was still-born too.
--
Roland Perry
Jeremy Double
2019-10-01 12:06:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by David Cantrell
Post by Roland Perry
And today Boris's latest idea is to spend (or is he expecting someone
else to spend) ?220m on new buses (and all contactless payment) because
the Roastmaster was such a success, apparently.
I don't get this antipathy to the Boris buses. I'm a passenger,
frequently. They do their job well, combining the benefits of a normal
double decker with the one benefit of the bendy monstrosities - quick
boarding - without the humungous downsides of the bendies taking up too
much road space and blocking junctions.
They're very heavy, which limits their capacity as does the rear platform
and second staircase, the hybrid system has never worked properly, perhaps
because of the very limited space for the power unit under the rear stairs,
like the bendies they have double the fare evasion of normal buses, and
they cost almost twice as much as a conventional double decker (£350k vs
£190k). They acquired their 'Roastmaster' nickname because their
air-cooling didn't work and they lacked ventilation, which had to be
retro-fitted.
So, we have a bus that's 84% more expensive, with less capacity, longer and
heavier than a normal double-decker, less comfortable, worse fuel
consumption and whose entire reason for existence, the open rear platform,
is not used. No wonder the hoped-for sale of the design to other cities
never happened.
It's truly a fitting metaphor for the Boris Johnson mayoralty.
And let's hope his Brexit deal isn't as bad as his bus.
He was wittering on about buses on BBC Breakfast again this morning.
Mentioned smartcards as one of the ways to drive up usage.
There are various smartcard tickets in West Yorkshire, including one onto
which you can load daily, weekly or monthly passes (bus only or bus and
rail for various combinations of rail zones), and another which is a
stored-value card for bus travel.

Unfortunately, the only smart day pass offering is bus-only, which is a bit
annoying. A day pass for bus and rail, valid in the peak, would be very
useful for me.
--
Jeremy Double
Roland Perry
2019-10-01 13:13:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In message
<1828532187.591623937.139376.jmd.nospam-***@news.individual.ne
t>, at 12:06:30 on Tue, 1 Oct 2019, Jeremy Double
Post by Jeremy Double
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
So, we have a bus that's 84% more expensive, with less capacity, longer and
heavier than a normal double-decker, less comfortable, worse fuel
consumption and whose entire reason for existence, the open rear platform,
is not used. No wonder the hoped-for sale of the design to other cities
never happened.
It's truly a fitting metaphor for the Boris Johnson mayoralty.
And let's hope his Brexit deal isn't as bad as his bus.
He was wittering on about buses on BBC Breakfast again this morning.
Mentioned smartcards as one of the ways to drive up usage.
There are various smartcard tickets in West Yorkshire, including one onto
which you can load daily, weekly or monthly passes (bus only or bus and
rail for various combinations of rail zones), and another which is a
stored-value card for bus travel.
Unfortunately, the only smart day pass offering is bus-only, which is a bit
annoying.
There are plenty of smartcard schemes for buses, some of which have been
in place for more than a decade.

It's unfortunate that the one for Nottingham used to include the trams,
but after they were re-franchised doesn't any longer.

Most of its attraction was being a cut-price carnet of the already
existing "all day" paper ticket. That works well as an alternative to
tracking and capping every bus trip because it breaks even at two
singles, rather than the four singles under TfL.
Post by Jeremy Double
A day pass for bus and rail, valid in the peak, would be very
useful for me.
Perhaps Boris would consider funding rail as well as bus for Twiry card
holders outside London?
--
Roland Perry
Trolleybus
2019-10-01 13:31:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 1 Oct 2019 10:05:41 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by David Cantrell
Post by Roland Perry
And today Boris's latest idea is to spend (or is he expecting someone
else to spend) ?220m on new buses (and all contactless payment) because
the Roastmaster was such a success, apparently.
I don't get this antipathy to the Boris buses. I'm a passenger,
frequently. They do their job well, combining the benefits of a normal
double decker with the one benefit of the bendy monstrosities - quick
boarding - without the humungous downsides of the bendies taking up too
much road space and blocking junctions.
They're very heavy, which limits their capacity as does the rear platform
and second staircase, the hybrid system has never worked properly, perhaps
because of the very limited space for the power unit under the rear stairs,
like the bendies they have double the fare evasion of normal buses, and
they cost almost twice as much as a conventional double decker (£350k vs
£190k). They acquired their 'Roastmaster' nickname because their
air-cooling didn't work and they lacked ventilation, which had to be
retro-fitted.
So, we have a bus that's 84% more expensive, with less capacity, longer and
heavier than a normal double-decker, less comfortable, worse fuel
consumption and whose entire reason for existence, the open rear platform,
is not used. No wonder the hoped-for sale of the design to other cities
never happened.
Yes, all granted. But apart from that, they're fine.

Actually I really dislike them. I can't really say why, but they seem
cramped. And, as I normally have a paper ticket (an ODTC from outside
London) I can't take advantage of the mid/rear dors.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
Recliner
2019-10-01 14:09:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 01 Oct 2019 14:31:56 +0100, Trolleybus
Post by Trolleybus
On Tue, 1 Oct 2019 10:05:41 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by David Cantrell
Post by Roland Perry
And today Boris's latest idea is to spend (or is he expecting someone
else to spend) ?220m on new buses (and all contactless payment) because
the Roastmaster was such a success, apparently.
I don't get this antipathy to the Boris buses. I'm a passenger,
frequently. They do their job well, combining the benefits of a normal
double decker with the one benefit of the bendy monstrosities - quick
boarding - without the humungous downsides of the bendies taking up too
much road space and blocking junctions.
They're very heavy, which limits their capacity as does the rear platform
and second staircase, the hybrid system has never worked properly, perhaps
because of the very limited space for the power unit under the rear stairs,
like the bendies they have double the fare evasion of normal buses, and
they cost almost twice as much as a conventional double decker (£350k vs
£190k). They acquired their 'Roastmaster' nickname because their
air-cooling didn't work and they lacked ventilation, which had to be
retro-fitted.
So, we have a bus that's 84% more expensive, with less capacity, longer and
heavier than a normal double-decker, less comfortable, worse fuel
consumption and whose entire reason for existence, the open rear platform,
is not used. No wonder the hoped-for sale of the design to other cities
never happened.
Yes, all granted. But apart from that, they're fine.
Actually I really dislike them. I can't really say why, but they seem
cramped. And, as I normally have a paper ticket (an ODTC from outside
London) I can't take advantage of the mid/rear dors.
You can rejoice, as soon you'll be in the same position as all the
other passengers: the current proposal is to ban boarding from the
mid/rear doors, so they'll be exit-only. Everyone will have to board
from the front door, just like all other London buses, thus removing
the one supposed advantage of the bus, faster boarding.

This is to reduce the high level of fare evasion, more than double the
rate on the much cheaper, more economical, more reliable, more
comfortable conventional buses.

<https://londonist.com/london/transport/routemaster-buses-trialling-boarding-by-the-front-door-only>

I wasn't aware of this other problem with them:
<https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-38800789>

I wonder what will happen to the manufacturer's guarantee and software
support if Wrightbus is shut down?

It's interesting that Boris apparently regards this as the triumph of
his mayoralty, along with the overseas trade missions for London that
included his otherwise unqualified, pole-dancing American mistress.
Roland Perry
2019-10-01 18:12:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Trolleybus
Post by Recliner
So, we have a bus that's 84% more expensive, with less capacity, longer and
heavier than a normal double-decker, less comfortable, worse fuel
consumption and whose entire reason for existence, the open rear platform,
is not used. No wonder the hoped-for sale of the design to other cities
never happened.
Yes, all granted. But apart from that, they're fine.
Nothing to do with the Romans.
Post by Trolleybus
Actually I really dislike them. I can't really say why, but they seem
cramped. And, as I normally have a paper ticket (an ODTC from outside
London) I can't take advantage of the mid/rear dors.
Isn't the rear door locked out of use (it's hard to keep up).

If you asked BoJo in his current mood he'd say "We are absolutely
committed to keeping the rear door". [But you just can't use it].
--
Roland Perry
Recliner
2019-10-01 19:11:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Trolleybus
Post by Recliner
So, we have a bus that's 84% more expensive, with less capacity, longer and
heavier than a normal double-decker, less comfortable, worse fuel
consumption and whose entire reason for existence, the open rear platform,
is not used. No wonder the hoped-for sale of the design to other cities
never happened.
Yes, all granted. But apart from that, they're fine.
Nothing to do with the Romans.
Post by Trolleybus
Actually I really dislike them. I can't really say why, but they seem
cramped. And, as I normally have a paper ticket (an ODTC from outside
London) I can't take advantage of the mid/rear dors.
Isn't the rear door locked out of use (it's hard to keep up).
No, it behaves the same as the other two doors: open at stops, closed when
moving. It's long been that way out of the central area, but it's been
like that everywhere since Khan cut the excessive costs of the buses by
getting rid of all the platform attendants. Strangely, the unions didn't go
on strike, unlike on the railways where the guards' role was changed, but
none lost their jobs or any income.
Roland Perry
2019-10-01 19:21:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Trolleybus
Post by Recliner
So, we have a bus that's 84% more expensive, with less capacity, longer and
heavier than a normal double-decker, less comfortable, worse fuel
consumption and whose entire reason for existence, the open rear platform,
is not used. No wonder the hoped-for sale of the design to other cities
never happened.
Yes, all granted. But apart from that, they're fine.
Nothing to do with the Romans.
Post by Trolleybus
Actually I really dislike them. I can't really say why, but they seem
cramped. And, as I normally have a paper ticket (an ODTC from outside
London) I can't take advantage of the mid/rear dors.
Isn't the rear door locked out of use (it's hard to keep up).
No, it behaves the same as the other two doors: open at stops, closed when
moving. It's long been that way out of the central area, but it's been
like that everywhere since Khan cut the excessive costs of the buses by
getting rid of all the platform attendants.
Thanks. I was conflating "locked out of use always", with "locked out of
use when under way". The essential difference [user friendliness] of the
old London buses was you could hop and off whenever they were paused, eg
at traffic lights, quite irrespective of where the bus stops were.
Post by Recliner
Strangely, the unions didn't go on strike, unlike on the railways where
the guards' role was changed, but none lost their jobs or any income.
Hmm.
--
Roland Perry
Recliner
2019-10-01 20:34:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Trolleybus
Post by Recliner
So, we have a bus that's 84% more expensive, with less capacity, longer and
heavier than a normal double-decker, less comfortable, worse fuel
consumption and whose entire reason for existence, the open rear platform,
is not used. No wonder the hoped-for sale of the design to other cities
never happened.
Yes, all granted. But apart from that, they're fine.
Nothing to do with the Romans.
Post by Trolleybus
Actually I really dislike them. I can't really say why, but they seem
cramped. And, as I normally have a paper ticket (an ODTC from outside
London) I can't take advantage of the mid/rear dors.
Isn't the rear door locked out of use (it's hard to keep up).
No, it behaves the same as the other two doors: open at stops, closed when
moving. It's long been that way out of the central area, but it's been
like that everywhere since Khan cut the excessive costs of the buses by
getting rid of all the platform attendants.
Thanks. I was conflating "locked out of use always", with "locked out of
use when under way". The essential difference [user friendliness] of the
old London buses was you could hop and off whenever they were paused, eg
at traffic lights, quite irrespective of where the bus stops were.
Yup, and that was the original idea with the new buses, but Boris ignored
the warnings that this would no longer be permitted with an unsupervised
open platform, because of modern elfin safety rules.

With his perennial, verbose optimism, you could say he was confident that
"the doomsters and the gloomsters" would be proved wrong. But it turned out
that they did know what they were talking about, and TfL was left to keep
paying the hefty bill for his failed experiment, while he moved onwards and
upwards. He also cost TfL money for dumping the bendies prematurely.
Roland Perry
2019-10-02 06:14:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Trolleybus
Post by Recliner
So, we have a bus that's 84% more expensive, with less capacity, longer and
heavier than a normal double-decker, less comfortable, worse fuel
consumption and whose entire reason for existence, the open rear platform,
is not used. No wonder the hoped-for sale of the design to other cities
never happened.
Yes, all granted. But apart from that, they're fine.
Nothing to do with the Romans.
Post by Trolleybus
Actually I really dislike them. I can't really say why, but they seem
cramped. And, as I normally have a paper ticket (an ODTC from outside
London) I can't take advantage of the mid/rear dors.
Isn't the rear door locked out of use (it's hard to keep up).
No, it behaves the same as the other two doors: open at stops, closed when
moving. It's long been that way out of the central area, but it's been
like that everywhere since Khan cut the excessive costs of the buses by
getting rid of all the platform attendants.
Thanks. I was conflating "locked out of use always", with "locked out of
use when under way". The essential difference [user friendliness] of the
old London buses was you could hop and off whenever they were paused, eg
at traffic lights, quite irrespective of where the bus stops were.
Yup, and that was the original idea with the new buses, but Boris ignored
the warnings that this would no longer be permitted with an unsupervised
open platform, because of modern elfin safety rules.
<http://www.bbc.co.uk/london/content/articles/2008/05/06/boris_routemast
er_feature.shtml>

Shows "hop-on hop-off" buses with only a rear platform.
Post by Recliner
With his perennial, verbose optimism, you could say he was confident that
"the doomsters and the gloomsters" would be proved wrong. But it turned out
that they did know what they were talking about, and TfL was left to keep
paying the hefty bill for his failed experiment, while he moved onwards and
upwards. He also cost TfL money for dumping the bendies prematurely.
I was amused by his interview n BBC Breakfast yesterday where he quoted
what he claimed was a well know saying "there's no problem you can't fix
with a single decker bus".

I doubt he was indulging in self-parody regarding the double decker
Routemaster (replacing the single decker bendy bus); was it perhaps a
referenceto his battle bus?

Anyway Boris is unabashed, and his new London bus is "wonderful",
apparently.
--
Roland Perry
David Cantrell
2019-10-03 11:27:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Recliner
Post by David Cantrell
I don't get this antipathy to the Boris buses. I'm a passenger,
frequently. They do their job well, combining the benefits of a normal
double decker with the one benefit of the bendy monstrosities - quick
boarding - without the humungous downsides of the bendies taking up too
much road space and blocking junctions.
They're very heavy, which limits their capacity as does the rear platform
and second staircase
The second staircase helps make boarding quicker. It's a reasonable
trade-off IMO.
Post by Recliner
like the bendies they have double the fare evasion of normal buses
Again, a trade-off against quicker boarding.
Post by Recliner
They acquired their 'Roastmaster' nickname because their
air-cooling didn't work and they lacked ventilation, which had to be
retro-fitted.
Not a problem that I ever noticed.
--
David Cantrell | Cake Smuggler Extraordinaire

Are you feeling bored? depressed? slowed down? Evil Scientists may
be manipulating the speed of light in your vicinity. Buy our patented
instructional video to find out how, and maybe YOU can stop THEM
Recliner
2019-10-03 11:43:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Cantrell
Post by Recliner
Post by David Cantrell
I don't get this antipathy to the Boris buses. I'm a passenger,
frequently. They do their job well, combining the benefits of a normal
double decker with the one benefit of the bendy monstrosities - quick
boarding - without the humungous downsides of the bendies taking up too
much road space and blocking junctions.
They're very heavy, which limits their capacity as does the rear platform
and second staircase
The second staircase helps make boarding quicker. It's a reasonable
trade-off IMO.
Not for long. The proposal is to only allow boarding by the front door. So
the rear staircase will be for exit-only, which makes it an expensive waste
of space.
Post by David Cantrell
Post by Recliner
like the bendies they have double the fare evasion of normal buses
Again, a trade-off against quicker boarding.
An unacceptable one for TfL.
David Cantrell
2019-10-04 09:32:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Recliner
Post by David Cantrell
The second staircase helps make boarding quicker. It's a reasonable
trade-off IMO.
Not for long. The proposal is to only allow boarding by the front door. So
the rear staircase will be for exit-only, which makes it an expensive waste
of space.
If anything having a one way system will make it even better as you
won't have people waiting to go up the stairs while others come down.
--
David Cantrell | Nth greatest programmer in the world

You can't spell "slaughter" without "laughter"
Recliner
2019-10-04 09:53:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Cantrell
Post by Recliner
Post by David Cantrell
The second staircase helps make boarding quicker. It's a reasonable
trade-off IMO.
Not for long. The proposal is to only allow boarding by the front door. So
the rear staircase will be for exit-only, which makes it an expensive waste
of space.
If anything having a one way system will make it even better as you
won't have people waiting to go up the stairs while others come down.
It's not a problem with normal 'deckers: people come down before a stop,
and go up after it.

So have a bus costing almost twice as much, with lower capacity, worse fuel
consumption, less comfortable, and needing more maintenance than an
off-the-shelf hybrid double-decker make even less sense than before.
David Cantrell
2019-10-07 10:43:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Recliner
Post by David Cantrell
If anything having a one way system will make it even better as you
won't have people waiting to go up the stairs while others come down.
It's not a problem with normal 'deckers: people come down before a stop,
and go up after it.
... said someone who has never used a busy double decker.

You often *can't* go down the stairs before the stop because there are
people standing at the bottom, and of course there are people less
steady on their feet who are not comfortable walking about the upper
deck or down the stairs when the bus is moving. And of course because of
all the people coming down the stairs most people can't board until
they're all gone, because they're blocking not just the route to the
upper floor, but also the route to the back of the bus.
--
David Cantrell | Bourgeois reactionary pig

Irregular English:
you have anecdotes; they have data; I have proof
MissRiaElaine
2019-10-01 19:18:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Cantrell
I don't get this antipathy to the Boris buses. I'm a passenger,
frequently. They do their job well, combining the benefits of a normal
double decker with the one benefit of the bendy monstrosities - quick
boarding - without the humungous downsides of the bendies taking up too
much road space and blocking junctions.
They just look "wrong" to me. And furthermore, they are an insult to the
genuine, real Routemaster, which served London for many years and still
would to this day if not for the PC brigade.
--
Ria in Aberdeen

[Send address is invalid, use sipsoup at gmail dot com to reply direct]
Recliner
2019-10-01 20:34:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MissRiaElaine
Post by David Cantrell
I don't get this antipathy to the Boris buses. I'm a passenger,
frequently. They do their job well, combining the benefits of a normal
double decker with the one benefit of the bendy monstrosities - quick
boarding - without the humungous downsides of the bendies taking up too
much road space and blocking junctions.
They just look "wrong" to me. And furthermore, they are an insult to the
genuine, real Routemaster, which served London for many years and still
would to this day if not for the PC brigade.
Form followed function with the compact, light-weight, attractive, original
RM, whereas style dictated structure with the huge, heavy, expensive new
one.
Richard
2019-10-02 14:19:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 1 Oct 2019 20:18:06 +0100, MissRiaElaine
Post by MissRiaElaine
Post by David Cantrell
I don't get this antipathy to the Boris buses. I'm a passenger,
frequently. They do their job well, combining the benefits of a normal
double decker with the one benefit of the bendy monstrosities - quick
boarding - without the humungous downsides of the bendies taking up too
much road space and blocking junctions.
They just look "wrong" to me. And furthermore, they are an insult to the
genuine, real Routemaster, which served London for many years and still
would to this day if not for the PC brigade.
It's a shame you added "PC brigade". It is not a terrible thing that
almost everyone can use a bus now, or that 50 year old buses are not
on our streets. Routemasters were wonderful in their day, and I agree
that BJ's buses don't deserve the name. The only benefit they have is
the one that is on the way out.

I don't think the articulated buses were monstrosities either, in my
opinion they were the most user-friendly buses we've ever had. That
the mayor would have started a campaign of lies about them won't be a
surprise to anyone now.

Richard.
MissRiaElaine
2019-10-02 16:35:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Richard
I don't think the articulated buses were monstrosities either, in my
opinion they were the most user-friendly buses we've ever had. That
the mayor would have started a campaign of lies about them won't be a
surprise to anyone now.
We still have bendy buses up here, and long may they remain, they do the
job.

My comment on the PC brigade was valid. I never said Routemasters had to
be the only buses in service. My brother is disabled and uses a
wheelchair, I know all about the requirement for disabled access.
--
Ria in Aberdeen

[Send address is invalid, use sipsoup at gmail dot com to reply direct]
Recliner
2019-10-02 20:10:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MissRiaElaine
Post by Richard
I don't think the articulated buses were monstrosities either, in my
opinion they were the most user-friendly buses we've ever had. That
the mayor would have started a campaign of lies about them won't be a
surprise to anyone now.
We still have bendy buses up here, and long may they remain, they do the
job.
My comment on the PC brigade was valid. I never said Routemasters had to
be the only buses in service. My brother is disabled and uses a
wheelchair, I know all about the requirement for disabled access.
Apart from that, the old buses needed conductors, while modern buses are
OPO. That was the main factor in the initial switch from the popular RMs.
MissRiaElaine
2019-10-02 22:58:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Recliner
Post by MissRiaElaine
Post by Richard
I don't think the articulated buses were monstrosities either, in my
opinion they were the most user-friendly buses we've ever had. That
the mayor would have started a campaign of lies about them won't be a
surprise to anyone now.
We still have bendy buses up here, and long may they remain, they do the
job.
My comment on the PC brigade was valid. I never said Routemasters had to
be the only buses in service. My brother is disabled and uses a
wheelchair, I know all about the requirement for disabled access.
Apart from that, the old buses needed conductors, while modern buses are
OPO. That was the main factor in the initial switch from the popular RMs.
Thereby making even more people redundant. And reducing safety. Buses
with conductors never suffered the same level of antisocial behaviour as
they do now, with only one person (the driver) on board.

Not long after I started work driving, probably around 1999 or
thereabouts, one of my colleagues on a late night service reached the
point where he was due to come out of service for the night. This was
some way short of the normal terminus, and was so that the bus didn't
have too long a journey back to the garage. It was well after midnight
and was rarely busy.

When he got to this point, there were still three males on board. He
told them they would have to get off, as he was now out of service. The
destination was, of course, clearly shown on the front and side blinds
when they boarded, but they were very loud and abusive and were having
none of it.

"We want to go to Chelmsley Wood" they kept saying. This, for those who
don't know the Birmingham area, is an area to the east of the city, not
far from the airport and about another three miles or so further on from
where this particular bus terminated for the night.

The driver politely explained that he was now out of service and could
not take them any further. After several more abusive (on their part)
exchanges, they forced their way into the cab, dragged the driver out,
and gave him such a severe beating that he suffered three broken ribs
and was unable to return to work for several months. In fact I believe
he never did return to bus driving.

This is what happens when you get rid of conductors. Two people on the
bus may or may not have been a deterrent to these particular yobs, but
they would deter many others.
--
Ria in Aberdeen

[Send address is invalid, use sipsoup at gmail dot com to reply direct]
Recliner
2019-10-02 23:45:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MissRiaElaine
Post by Recliner
Post by MissRiaElaine
Post by Richard
I don't think the articulated buses were monstrosities either, in my
opinion they were the most user-friendly buses we've ever had. That
the mayor would have started a campaign of lies about them won't be a
surprise to anyone now.
We still have bendy buses up here, and long may they remain, they do the
job.
My comment on the PC brigade was valid. I never said Routemasters had to
be the only buses in service. My brother is disabled and uses a
wheelchair, I know all about the requirement for disabled access.
Apart from that, the old buses needed conductors, while modern buses are
OPO. That was the main factor in the initial switch from the popular RMs.
Thereby making even more people redundant.
Britain isn't short of minimum wage jobs. It's short of the people to do
them. There would be even fewer buses still running if they all had to
carry conductors.
Post by MissRiaElaine
And reducing safety. Buses
with conductors never suffered the same level of antisocial behaviour as
they do now, with only one person (the driver) on board.
Modern buses have extensive, high res CCTV coverage covering the whole bus
interior. The yobs will certainly be caught on camera, and the drivers can
summon urgent assistance. My local buses show the CCTV images in a constant
cycle, so you're reminded of how your image is being recorded.
Post by MissRiaElaine
Not long after I started work driving, probably around 1999 or
thereabouts, one of my colleagues on a late night service reached the
point where he was due to come out of service for the night. This was
some way short of the normal terminus, and was so that the bus didn't
have too long a journey back to the garage. It was well after midnight
and was rarely busy.
When he got to this point, there were still three males on board. He
told them they would have to get off, as he was now out of service. The
destination was, of course, clearly shown on the front and side blinds
when they boarded, but they were very loud and abusive and were having
none of it.
"We want to go to Chelmsley Wood" they kept saying. This, for those who
don't know the Birmingham area, is an area to the east of the city, not
far from the airport and about another three miles or so further on from
where this particular bus terminated for the night.
The driver politely explained that he was now out of service and could
not take them any further. After several more abusive (on their part)
exchanges, they forced their way into the cab, dragged the driver out,
and gave him such a severe beating that he suffered three broken ribs
and was unable to return to work for several months. In fact I believe
he never did return to bus driving.
This is what happens when you get rid of conductors. Two people on the
bus may or may not have been a deterrent to these particular yobs, but
they would deter many others.
The drivers now have a secure cab door for protection against aggressive
passengers, which is more than conductors ever had. I suspect that there
are far fewer staff injuries now than when there were vulnerable conductors
trying to collect cash fares. And, of course, few cash fares are now
collected (none in London), so there's little or nothing to rob.
MissRiaElaine
2019-10-03 12:00:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Recliner
Modern buses have extensive, high res CCTV coverage covering the whole bus
interior. The yobs will certainly be caught on camera, and the drivers can
summon urgent assistance. My local buses show the CCTV images in a constant
cycle, so you're reminded of how your image is being recorded.
Ah, CCTV. My last job before I retired was to deal with requests for
CCTV; processing footage for issue to police, insurance investigators
and the like.

There were not enough cameras to cover the full interior of the vehicle,
so there were many, many blind spots. And those cameras that we had were
frequently vandalised so that they were useless in the event of an
incident. Even if the miscreants *are* caught on camera, identifying
them and ensuring they are dealt with is a whole different ball game.

Getting the dead cameras repaired was also a nightmare; there was ONE
engineer to cover several garages and he was worked to a frazzle,
sometimes it would take him weeks to get around to us. In the meantime,
anything could have happened, and frequently did.

Summon urgent assistance. Ah, yes. There is an emergency button on the
radio system, true. But pressing it doesn't always result in assistance
arriving quickly, or even at all. In my driving days, I was once punched
in the mouth by a drunken yob for no reason other than I had politely
asked him to pay some bus fare. (This was in the days before full cab
door screens, but I've seen people punch their way through those as well).

So I sat there, blood streaming down my face, and pressed the emergency
button. The controller did come on the line quickly, true. But the first
words out of his mouth were not "are you ok..?" or "do you need
police/ambulance..?" No, he simply said "can you carry on in service..?"

I don't think I need to mention what my reply was.
--
Ria in Aberdeen

[Send address is invalid, use sipsoup at gmail dot com to reply direct]
b***@nowhere.co.uk
2019-10-03 12:03:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 13:00:57 +0100
Post by MissRiaElaine
So I sat there, blood streaming down my face, and pressed the emergency
button. The controller did come on the line quickly, true. But the first
words out of his mouth were not "are you ok..?" or "do you need
police/ambulance..?" No, he simply said "can you carry on in service..?"
I don't think I need to mention what my reply was.
If I had to do that job I'd carry a perfectly legal but nicely sharpened
penknife for occasions like that. I'd sooner lose my job than my life.
Sammi Gray-Jones
2019-10-03 12:16:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@nowhere.co.uk
If I had to do that job I'd carry a perfectly legal but nicely sharpened
penknife for occasions like that. I'd sooner lose my job than my life.
Oh really, some yob is beating the living daylights out of you and you
are going to reach into your pocket, remove the knife and open it as
you're being punched. Good luck with that.
b***@nowhere.co.uk
2019-10-03 15:14:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 13:16:08 +0100
Post by Sammi Gray-Jones
Post by b***@nowhere.co.uk
If I had to do that job I'd carry a perfectly legal but nicely sharpened
penknife for occasions like that. I'd sooner lose my job than my life.
Oh really, some yob is beating the living daylights out of you and you
are going to reach into your pocket, remove the knife and open it as
you're being punched. Good luck with that.
So what would you do , just sit there and whimper? Its better than nothing.
MissRiaElaine
2019-10-03 19:04:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@nowhere.co.uk
On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 13:16:08 +0100
Post by Sammi Gray-Jones
Post by b***@nowhere.co.uk
If I had to do that job I'd carry a perfectly legal but nicely sharpened
penknife for occasions like that. I'd sooner lose my job than my life.
Oh really, some yob is beating the living daylights out of you and you
are going to reach into your pocket, remove the knife and open it as
you're being punched. Good luck with that.
So what would you do , just sit there and whimper? Its better than nothing.
Only if you can actually get to it. You have obviously never been on the
receiving end of someone trying to thump the living daylights out of you.
--
Ria in Aberdeen

[Send address is invalid, use sipsoup at gmail dot com to reply direct]
b***@nowhere.co.uk
2019-10-04 19:04:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 20:04:28 +0100
Post by MissRiaElaine
Post by b***@nowhere.co.uk
On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 13:16:08 +0100
Post by Sammi Gray-Jones
Post by b***@nowhere.co.uk
If I had to do that job I'd carry a perfectly legal but nicely sharpened
penknife for occasions like that. I'd sooner lose my job than my life.
Oh really, some yob is beating the living daylights out of you and you
are going to reach into your pocket, remove the knife and open it as
you're being punched. Good luck with that.
So what would you do , just sit there and whimper? Its better than nothing.
Only if you can actually get to it. You have obviously never been on the
receiving end of someone trying to thump the living daylights out of you.
Ha, if only you knew :)
Sammi Gray-Jones
2019-10-03 19:11:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@nowhere.co.uk
On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 13:16:08 +0100
Post by Sammi Gray-Jones
Post by b***@nowhere.co.uk
If I had to do that job I'd carry a perfectly legal but nicely sharpened
penknife for occasions like that. I'd sooner lose my job than my life.
Oh really, some yob is beating the living daylights out of you and you
are going to reach into your pocket, remove the knife and open it as
you're being punched. Good luck with that.
So what would you do , just sit there and whimper? Its better than nothing.
It takes time to get the knife out of your pocket, then find the right
blade and finally open it. In that time the yob has managed to split
your lip and leg it.
Recliner
2019-10-03 21:36:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sammi Gray-Jones
Post by b***@nowhere.co.uk
On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 13:16:08 +0100
Post by Sammi Gray-Jones
Post by b***@nowhere.co.uk
If I had to do that job I'd carry a perfectly legal but nicely sharpened
penknife for occasions like that. I'd sooner lose my job than my life.
Oh really, some yob is beating the living daylights out of you and you
are going to reach into your pocket, remove the knife and open it as
you're being punched. Good luck with that.
So what would you do , just sit there and whimper? Its better than nothing.
It takes time to get the knife out of your pocket, then find the right
blade and finally open it. In that time the yob has managed to split
your lip and leg it.
Or grab the knife and use it on you.
b***@nowhere.co.uk
2019-10-04 19:09:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 20:11:28 +0100
Post by Sammi Gray-Jones
Post by b***@nowhere.co.uk
On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 13:16:08 +0100
Post by Sammi Gray-Jones
Post by b***@nowhere.co.uk
If I had to do that job I'd carry a perfectly legal but nicely sharpened
penknife for occasions like that. I'd sooner lose my job than my life.
Oh really, some yob is beating the living daylights out of you and you
are going to reach into your pocket, remove the knife and open it as
you're being punched. Good luck with that.
So what would you do , just sit there and whimper? Its better than nothing.
It takes time to get the knife out of your pocket, then find the right
blade and finally open it. In that time the yob has managed to split
your lip and leg it.
I wasn't talking about a swiss army knife - most penknifes have a single
blade. And sure, I'm not going to pretend its the most practical solution but
its better than nothing if someone is determined to do you over. One stab
in the arm or leg might give you enough time to get away and give them pause
for thought.
Marland
2019-10-05 15:00:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@nowhere.co.uk
On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 20:11:28 +0100
Post by Sammi Gray-Jones
Post by b***@nowhere.co.uk
On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 13:16:08 +0100
Post by Sammi Gray-Jones
Post by b***@nowhere.co.uk
If I had to do that job I'd carry a perfectly legal but nicely sharpened
penknife for occasions like that. I'd sooner lose my job than my life.
Oh really, some yob is beating the living daylights out of you and you
are going to reach into your pocket, remove the knife and open it as
you're being punched. Good luck with that.
So what would you do , just sit there and whimper? Its better than nothing.
It takes time to get the knife out of your pocket, then find the right
blade and finally open it. In that time the yob has managed to split
your lip and leg it.
I wasn't talking about a swiss army knife - most penknifes have a single
blade. And sure, I'm not going to pretend its the most practical solution but
its better than nothing if someone is determined to do you over. One stab
in the arm or leg might give you enough time to get away and give them pause
for thought.
TBH if you do have the right frame of mind to fight back and many don’t,
then a small spray bottle filled with vinegar etc and aimed in the eyes may
be more effective, commercial pepper sprays can be had but having one on
ones person is probably illegal. Grinding up some Dorset Nagas and making
some hot condiment for use on your lunch is just an indicator of strange
taste.



GH
b***@nowhere.co.uk
2019-10-05 15:49:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 5 Oct 2019 15:00:25 GMT
Post by b***@nowhere.co.uk
I wasn't talking about a swiss army knife - most penknifes have a single
blade. And sure, I'm not going to pretend its the most practical solution
but
Post by b***@nowhere.co.uk
its better than nothing if someone is determined to do you over. One stab
in the arm or leg might give you enough time to get away and give them pause
for thought.
TBH if you do have the right frame of mind to fight back and many don’t,
then a small spray bottle filled with vinegar etc and aimed in the eyes may
be more effective, commercial pepper sprays can be had but having one on
ones person is probably illegal. Grinding up some Dorset Nagas and making
I believe they are illegal. Which is odd given that it does no long term damage
but could save someone from being raped or killed.
David Cantrell
2019-10-03 11:39:06 UTC
Reply
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Post by MissRiaElaine
Post by Richard
I don't think the articulated buses were monstrosities either, in my
opinion they were the most user-friendly buses we've ever had. That
the mayor would have started a campaign of lies about them won't be a
surprise to anyone now.
We still have bendy buses up here, and long may they remain, they do the
job.
I'm sure that they're fine in places that don't have much traffic or
so many buses. My complaints about them in London were that they were so
long that they couldn't cross junctions in one go and so blocked the
flow of traffic, including most importantly the flow of other buses;
that they replaced Routemasters on a passenger-per-passenger basis and
so because the new buses individually held more people the buses ran
less frequently; and that a smaller proportion of passengers had seats.

Their replacements solve every one of those problems.
--
David Cantrell | semi-evolved ape-thing
Recliner
2019-10-11 10:28:24 UTC
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Permalink
Looks like the rescue deal might have been bulldozed into the ditch:

<https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/wrightbus-war-of-words-as-rescue-talks-collapse-cxrzxw2zk?shareToken=6a2b5480bfd679d5c08b9168bcad8f38>
Roland Perry
2019-10-11 10:40:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Recliner
<https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/wrightbus-war-of-words-as-rescue-
talks-collapse-cxrzxw2zk?shareToken=6a2b5480bfd679d5c08b9168bcad8f38>
Alternatively:

<https://www.itv.com/news/utv/2019-10-11/deal-reached-in-principle-for-
wrightbus/>
--
Roland Perry
Recliner
2019-10-11 11:18:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
<https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/wrightbus-war-of-words-as-rescue-
talks-collapse-cxrzxw2zk?shareToken=6a2b5480bfd679d5c08b9168bcad8f38>
<https://www.itv.com/news/utv/2019-10-11/deal-reached-in-principle-for-
wrightbus/>
Yes, that seems to be more up to date, and better news.

I wonder if the plan is to keep building buses, or to make JCB's usual
diggers, bulldozers, etc? Or, perhaps both. as there doesn't seem to
be enough demand for buses to keep the factory open.
Recliner
2019-10-13 15:48:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
<https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/wrightbus-war-of-words-as-rescue-
talks-collapse-cxrzxw2zk?shareToken=6a2b5480bfd679d5c08b9168bcad8f38>
<https://www.itv.com/news/utv/2019-10-11/deal-reached-in-principle-for-
wrightbus/>
Yes, that seems to be more up to date, and better news.
I wonder if the plan is to keep building buses, or to make JCB's usual
diggers, bulldozers, etc? Or, perhaps both. as there doesn't seem to
be enough demand for buses to keep the factory open.
It looks like this is actually nothing to do with JCB. It seems that
Wightbus will become the BBC, with a focus on hydrogen buses:

<https://www.irishnews.com/news/2019/10/12/news/as-jcb-heir-s-son-takes-wrightbus-reins-how-many-jobs-can-be-saved--1736870/>
Roland Perry
2019-10-13 17:32:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
<https://www.itv.com/news/utv/2019-10-11/deal-reached-in-principle-for-
wrightbus/>
Yes, that seems to be more up to date, and better news.
I wonder if the plan is to keep building buses, or to make JCB's usual
diggers, bulldozers, etc? Or, perhaps both. as there doesn't seem to
be enough demand for buses to keep the factory open.
It looks like this is actually nothing to do with JCB. It seems that
<https://www.irishnews.com/news/2019/10/12/news/as-jcb-heir-s-son-takes-wrightbus-reins-how-many-jobs-can-be-saved--1736870/>
And no necessarily employing even most of the former employees.

But they do seem to have grabbed some adjacent farmland, whatever that
means to them.
--
Roland Perry
Recliner
2019-10-13 19:52:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
<https://www.itv.com/news/utv/2019-10-11/deal-reached-in-principle-for-
wrightbus/>
Yes, that seems to be more up to date, and better news.
I wonder if the plan is to keep building buses, or to make JCB's usual
diggers, bulldozers, etc? Or, perhaps both. as there doesn't seem to
be enough demand for buses to keep the factory open.
It looks like this is actually nothing to do with JCB. It seems that
<https://www.irishnews.com/news/2019/10/12/news/as-jcb-heir-s-son-takes-wrightbus-reins-how-many-jobs-can-be-saved--1736870/>
And no necessarily employing even most of the former employees.
Almost certainly not, as the factory was apparently over-manned. The former
owner was a religious Protestant, while the new one is Catholic, so that
might alter the employee profile.
Post by Roland Perry
But they do seem to have grabbed some adjacent farmland, whatever that
means to them.
It's not clear what the farmland is to be used for, as it's been donated by
Wright to Mid and East Antrim council, not to Bamford. As it's not part of
the factory, I wonder why the ownership needed to change? Perhaps it's
needed for access, or as a bus park?

b***@nowhere.co.uk
2019-10-13 18:03:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 13 Oct 2019 15:48:21 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Recliner
Post by Recliner
2019, Billy No Mates Always On His Own <Billy No Mates Always On His Own.use
Post by Recliner
<https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/wrightbus-war-of-words-as-rescue-
talks-collapse-cxrzxw2zk?shareToken=6a2b5480bfd679d5c08b9168bcad8f38>
<https://www.itv.com/news/utv/2019-10-11/deal-reached-in-principle-for-
wrightbus/>
Yes, that seems to be more up to date, and better news.
I wonder if the plan is to keep building buses, or to make JCB's usual
diggers, bulldozers, etc? Or, perhaps both. as there doesn't seem to
be enough demand for buses to keep the factory open.
It looks like this is actually nothing to do with JCB. It seems that
If they become the BBC half or more of the staff will have to go as they
won't meet gender and ethnic quotas! And they'll have to start reading
The Guardian during lunchtime. No more football or rugby chat, it'll be
30 mins of handwringing about the plight of the roma goatherders in
Godknowswhereistan.
Recliner
2019-10-13 19:47:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@nowhere.co.uk
On Sun, 13 Oct 2019 15:48:21 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Recliner
Post by Recliner
2019, Billy No Mates Always On His Own <Billy No Mates Always On His Own.use
Post by Recliner
<https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/wrightbus-war-of-words-as-rescue-
talks-collapse-cxrzxw2zk?shareToken=6a2b5480bfd679d5c08b9168bcad8f38>
<https://www.itv.com/news/utv/2019-10-11/deal-reached-in-principle-for-
wrightbus/>
Yes, that seems to be more up to date, and better news.
I wonder if the plan is to keep building buses, or to make JCB's usual
diggers, bulldozers, etc? Or, perhaps both. as there doesn't seem to
be enough demand for buses to keep the factory open.
It looks like this is actually nothing to do with JCB. It seems that
If they become the BBC half or more of the staff will have to go as they
won't meet gender and ethnic quotas! And they'll have to start reading
The Guardian during lunchtime. No more football or rugby chat, it'll be
30 mins of handwringing about the plight of the roma goatherders in
Godknowswhereistan.
Wrong BBC.
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