Discussion:
Moquette history?
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Graham Harrison
2020-12-22 15:14:37 UTC
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As a child in the 1950s and 1960s I wasn't aware of more than one
moquette - it was all essentially the same to me. In fact I probably
didn't become aware that there were different designs for different
underground lines and buses until sometime this century.

My question is therefore how many designs of moquette has LT/TfL used
over the years and for (roughly) what periods?
Mike Roberts
2020-12-22 15:35:34 UTC
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Post by Graham Harrison
As a child in the 1950s and 1960s I wasn't aware of more than one
moquette - it was all essentially the same to me. In fact I probably
didn't become aware that there were different designs for different
underground lines and buses until sometime this century.
My question is therefore how many designs of moquette has LT/TfL used
over the years and for (roughly) what periods?
The answer might be at
https://www.ltmuseum.co.uk/collections/projects/moquette-project
Graeme Wall
2020-12-22 16:26:59 UTC
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Post by Mike Roberts
Post by Graham Harrison
As a child in the 1950s and 1960s I wasn't aware of more than one
moquette - it was all essentially the same to me. In fact I probably
didn't become aware that there were different designs for different
underground lines and buses until sometime this century.
My question is therefore how many designs of moquette has LT/TfL used
over the years and for (roughly) what periods?
The answer might be at
https://www.ltmuseum.co.uk/collections/projects/moquette-project
Simple reply, dozens. There's a book called Underground Movement, which
is a history of London transport design and has a section just on
moquettes, the book is dated 2000. Apparently the first moquettes were
used in the early 1920s, presumably it was wooden benches before that.
The first pattern was called Lozenge, introduced in 1923. Christian
Barman commissioned new designs in 1936 for the [thread convergence]
then new 1938 stock! The book illustrates 11 different patterns used up
till the late 1950s Much plainer ones were introduced in the 1960s.
Route specific moquettes appear to have been introduced in the late
1980s refurbishment programmes. After that it woud appear part of the
design brief for new trains incuded new moquette patterns.

NB the original lozenge design looks to me very similar to the moquette
used on the RT and RM buses of my youth.
--
Graeme Wall
This account not read.
Graham Harrison
2020-12-22 19:32:50 UTC
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On Tue, 22 Dec 2020 16:26:59 +0000, Graeme Wall
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by Mike Roberts
Post by Graham Harrison
As a child in the 1950s and 1960s I wasn't aware of more than one
moquette - it was all essentially the same to me. In fact I probably
didn't become aware that there were different designs for different
underground lines and buses until sometime this century.
My question is therefore how many designs of moquette has LT/TfL used
over the years and for (roughly) what periods?
The answer might be at
https://www.ltmuseum.co.uk/collections/projects/moquette-project
Simple reply, dozens. There's a book called Underground Movement, which
is a history of London transport design and has a section just on
moquettes, the book is dated 2000. Apparently the first moquettes were
used in the early 1920s, presumably it was wooden benches before that.
The first pattern was called Lozenge, introduced in 1923. Christian
Barman commissioned new designs in 1936 for the [thread convergence]
then new 1938 stock! The book illustrates 11 different patterns used up
till the late 1950s Much plainer ones were introduced in the 1960s.
Route specific moquettes appear to have been introduced in the late
1980s refurbishment programmes. After that it woud appear part of the
design brief for new trains incuded new moquette patterns.
NB the original lozenge design looks to me very similar to the moquette
used on the RT and RM buses of my youth.
Thank you to both. Found both books.
tim...
2020-12-25 08:55:42 UTC
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Post by Graham Harrison
As a child in the 1950s and 1960s I wasn't aware of more than one
moquette - it was all essentially the same to me. In fact I probably
didn't become aware that there were different designs for different
underground lines and buses until sometime this century.
My question is therefore how many designs of moquette has LT/TfL used
over the years and for (roughly) what periods?
despite my lifetime association with the capital, I didn't even notice that
each one had a different moquette

I just thought the different designs was just some random thing

Until I saw a quiz question (in the Metro IIRC) asking you to identify which
moquette belonged to which line

and I thought "Each line has a different one - who knew" (obviously better
informed people than me)
Recliner
2020-12-25 11:02:06 UTC
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Post by tim...
Post by Graham Harrison
As a child in the 1950s and 1960s I wasn't aware of more than one
moquette - it was all essentially the same to me. In fact I probably
didn't become aware that there were different designs for different
underground lines and buses until sometime this century.
My question is therefore how many designs of moquette has LT/TfL used
over the years and for (roughly) what periods?
despite my lifetime association with the capital, I didn't even notice that
each one had a different moquette
I just thought the different designs was just some random thing
Until I saw a quiz question (in the Metro IIRC) asking you to identify which
moquette belonged to which line
and I thought "Each line has a different one - who knew" (obviously better
informed people than me)
Surely most people knew?
Graeme Wall
2020-12-25 11:36:08 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Post by tim...
Post by Graham Harrison
As a child in the 1950s and 1960s I wasn't aware of more than one
moquette - it was all essentially the same to me. In fact I probably
didn't become aware that there were different designs for different
underground lines and buses until sometime this century.
My question is therefore how many designs of moquette has LT/TfL used
over the years and for (roughly) what periods?
despite my lifetime association with the capital, I didn't even notice that
each one had a different moquette
I just thought the different designs was just some random thing
Until I saw a quiz question (in the Metro IIRC) asking you to identify which
moquette belonged to which line
and I thought "Each line has a different one - who knew" (obviously better
informed people than me)
Surely most people knew?
Not the general public I suspect, like a lot of good design you don't
really notice them until they re gone.
--
Graeme Wall
This account not read.
Recliner
2020-12-25 11:45:45 UTC
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Post by Graeme Wall
Post by Recliner
Post by tim...
Post by Graham Harrison
As a child in the 1950s and 1960s I wasn't aware of more than one
moquette - it was all essentially the same to me. In fact I probably
didn't become aware that there were different designs for different
underground lines and buses until sometime this century.
My question is therefore how many designs of moquette has LT/TfL used
over the years and for (roughly) what periods?
despite my lifetime association with the capital, I didn't even notice that
each one had a different moquette
I just thought the different designs was just some random thing
Until I saw a quiz question (in the Metro IIRC) asking you to identify which
moquette belonged to which line
and I thought "Each line has a different one - who knew" (obviously better
informed people than me)
Surely most people knew?
Not the general public I suspect, like a lot of good design you don't
really notice them until they re gone.
Apart from the general designs, I quite like to spot the priority seating:
<Loading Image...>

It's also fun trying to spot the landmarks woven into the patterns:
<https://www.standard.co.uk/lifestyle/london-life/the-are-4-london-landmarks-hidden-in-the-tubes-seat-patterns-how-many-can-you-spot-a3108961.html>
Graeme Wall
2020-12-25 11:34:55 UTC
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Post by tim...
Post by Graham Harrison
As a child in the 1950s and 1960s I wasn't aware of more than one
moquette - it was all essentially the same to me. In fact I probably
didn't become aware that there were different designs for different
underground lines and buses until sometime this century.
My question is therefore how many designs of moquette has LT/TfL used
over the years and for (roughly) what periods?
despite my lifetime association with the capital, I didn't even notice
that each one had a different moquette
I just thought the different designs was just some random thing
Until I saw a quiz question (in the Metro IIRC) asking you to identify
which moquette belonged to which line
and I thought "Each line has a different one - who knew" (obviously
better informed people than me)
They are a bit more subtle than the different coloured grab rails and so on.
--
Graeme Wall
This account not read.
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