Discussion:
Johnston font welcome sign at Gainsborough Lea Road
(too old to reply)
Basil Jet
2018-05-21 12:53:01 UTC
Permalink
Are they allowed to do that? I suspect it was put up by the "Friends Of
Lea Road".
Richard J.
2018-05-21 14:36:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Basil Jet
Are they allowed to do that? I suspect it was put up by the "Friends Of
Lea Road".
Depends which version of Johnston font. If it's the original Johnston in its digital form, licensed by TfL exclusively to P22 Type Foundry, that's now a commercially available font.

If they've used New Johnston or Johnston 100, they have probably violated TfL's copyright. There are also a number of other fonts based on Johnston such as Granby and ITC Johnston which are presumably independent of TfL.

I'd need a high-res photo of the sign to decide which font it is.
--
Richard J.
(to email me, swap 'uk' and 'yon' in address)
Recliner
2018-05-21 14:47:32 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
Are they allowed to do that? I suspect it was put up by the "Friends Of
Lea Road".
I was wandering down the Thames the other day, after a tour of Fullers
Brewery, and spotted a blue plaque that really deserves to be in Johnston
font:
https://binged.it/2GBnWms
Richard J.
2018-05-21 15:25:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Recliner
Post by Basil Jet
Are they allowed to do that? I suspect it was put up by the "Friends Of
Lea Road".
I was wandering down the Thames the other day, after a tour of Fullers
Brewery, and spotted a blue plaque that really deserves to be in Johnston
https://binged.it/2GBnWms
It is indeed in Johnston font, not that you'd know from the awful Bing maps, which also gets the road name wrong. It's Hammersmith Terrace there, not Chiswick Mall.
--
Richard J.
(to email me, swap 'uk' and 'yon' in address)
Offramp
2018-05-21 16:19:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard J.
It is indeed in Johnston font, not that you'd know from the awful Bing maps, which also gets the road name wrong. It's Hammersmith Terrace there, not Chiswick Mall.
Bing maps! I did not know there was such a thing.
Marland
2018-05-21 18:26:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard J.
Post by Recliner
I was wandering down the Thames the other day, after a tour of Fullers
Brewery, and spotted a blue plaque that really deserves to be in Johnston
https://binged.it/2GBnWms
It is indeed in Johnston font, not that you'd know from the awful Bing
maps, which also gets the road name wrong. It's Hammersmith Terrace
there, not Chiswick Mall.
ISTR there is a marker stone that marks the boundary between Hammersmith
and Chiswick,
Surprisingly nondescript and a bit overshadowed now.
Ahh found a piccy.
http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/2130450


It’s a walk I do a couple of time a year as I have rellies living nearby
one of whom does a running / fast walk circuit most days along both banks
using Hammersmith and Barnes bridges, hope I have his energy when I’m 85.

A good many of the properties along there now belong to Russian oligarchs
that have invested the money they have acquired in them and are pricey
even by London standards.
Surprisingly the Chiswick end used to be quite industrial with the Fullers
Brewery being about the last.
Thornicrofts the shipbuilders were located there until they moved to
Southampton in the 1900’s

There used to be healthy communities of houseboats as well but they were
priced out about 50 years ago
So although a pleasant walk it isn’t quite as interesting to me as it once
was.

GH
Recliner
2018-05-22 11:17:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Marland
Post by Richard J.
Post by Recliner
I was wandering down the Thames the other day, after a tour of Fullers
Brewery, and spotted a blue plaque that really deserves to be in Johnston
https://binged.it/2GBnWms
It is indeed in Johnston font, not that you'd know from the awful Bing
maps, which also gets the road name wrong. It's Hammersmith Terrace
there, not Chiswick Mall.
ISTR there is a marker stone that marks the boundary between Hammersmith
and Chiswick,
Surprisingly nondescript and a bit overshadowed now.
Ahh found a piccy.
http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/2130450
It’s a walk I do a couple of time a year as I have rellies living nearby
one of whom does a running / fast walk circuit most days along both banks
using Hammersmith and Barnes bridges, hope I have his energy when I’m 85.
A good many of the properties along there now belong to Russian oligarchs
that have invested the money they have acquired in them and are pricey
even by London standards.
Surprisingly the Chiswick end used to be quite industrial with the Fullers
Brewery being about the last.
Thornicrofts the shipbuilders were located there until they moved to
Southampton in the 1900’s
There used to be healthy communities of houseboats as well but they were
priced out about 50 years ago
So although a pleasant walk it isn’t quite as interesting to me as it once
was.
I'm assuming that the oligarchs don't live in the flood-prone
low-lying properties close to the river? Judging by these household
flood barriers and glass walls, the river gets pretty high on a
regular basis:
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/albums/72157697108062115>

I'm bemused why people would live in basement flats in a flood-prone
area.
Roland Perry
2018-05-22 12:24:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Recliner
I'm bemused why people would live in basement flats in a flood-prone
area.
Because in the short term they can't afford anything else (even assuming
they are cogniscent of the risks).
--
Roland Perry
Recliner
2018-05-22 13:48:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
I'm bemused why people would live in basement flats in a flood-prone
area.
Because in the short term they can't afford anything else (even assuming
they are cogniscent of the risks).
You're assuming that those flats are cheap. I rather suspect that they're
not.
Roland Perry
2018-05-22 13:58:02 UTC
Permalink
In message
<601402027.548689608.569674.recliner.ng-***@news.eternal-septe
mber.org>, at 13:48:03 on Tue, 22 May 2018, Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
I'm bemused why people would live in basement flats in a flood-prone
area.
Because in the short term they can't afford anything else (even assuming
they are cogniscent of the risks).
You're assuming that those flats are cheap. I rather suspect that they're
not.
They will be cheaper than anything else the buyers might aspire to.
--
Roland Perry
Recliner
2018-05-22 14:28:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roland Perry
In message
mber.org>, at 13:48:03 on Tue, 22 May 2018, Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
I'm bemused why people would live in basement flats in a flood-prone
area.
Because in the short term they can't afford anything else (even assuming
they are cogniscent of the risks).
You're assuming that those flats are cheap. I rather suspect that they're
not.
They will be cheaper than anything else the buyers might aspire to.
How did 'afford' turn into 'aspire'? Probably nearly everyone lives
somewhere cheaper than they'd aspire to, without living underground in an
area certain to flood.
Roland Perry
2018-05-22 15:34:59 UTC
Permalink
In message
<48489773.548691955.078675.recliner.ng-***@news.eternal-septem
ber.org>, at 14:28:37 on Tue, 22 May 2018, Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
I'm bemused why people would live in basement flats in a flood-prone
area.
Because in the short term they can't afford anything else (even assuming
they are cogniscent of the risks).
You're assuming that those flats are cheap. I rather suspect that they're
not.
They will be cheaper than anything else the buyers might aspire to.
How did 'afford' turn into 'aspire'? Probably nearly everyone lives
somewhere cheaper than they'd aspire to, without living underground in an
area certain to flood.
The latter has more square feet, which is what they aspire to.
--
Roland Perry
Marland
2018-05-22 19:36:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Recliner
Post by Marland
ISTR there is a marker stone that marks the boundary between Hammersmith
and Chiswick,
A good many of the properties along there now belong to Russian oligarchs
I'm assuming that the oligarchs don't live in the flood-prone
low-lying properties close to the river? Judging by these household
flood barriers and glass walls, the river gets pretty high on a
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/albums/72157697108062115>
The young couple who told us said they were rented out at high rents or in
the case of the one they were in they were living there as caretakers but
the owner had only visited once in over a year,the. The couple had Eastern
European accents.

The river floods at high tides frequently, possibly you noticed vegetation
in the road that is often left at times of high tidal levels.

I don’t know if in the past the basements just got wet and people lived
with it,
Now a lot of those basements will be living space rather than a coal hole.

Surprising now but that bit of Chiswick became a bit of a backwater after
the LSWR routes were opened both the existing national rail over Barnes
bridge and what is now the District from Richmond to Hammersmith
moved focus away from the river as market gardens around Turnham Green and
Ravenscourt Court Park were built on, though the Hammersmith and Chiswick
which got there from the North London Route got stifled on the way and lost
its passenger service early having run a rail motor through cabbage fields
only to find that the new house owners that took over preferred the LSWR
or trams.
https://goo.gl/images/h22yC2

As a backwater the riverside appealed to arty types.
One of those basements is a museum to William Morris the 19th century
designer of various things who lived in the house above in the 1870’s.
https://williammorrissociety.org

GH
Recliner
2018-05-22 20:03:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Marland
Post by Recliner
Post by Marland
ISTR there is a marker stone that marks the boundary between Hammersmith
and Chiswick,
A good many of the properties along there now belong to Russian oligarchs
I'm assuming that the oligarchs don't live in the flood-prone
low-lying properties close to the river? Judging by these household
flood barriers and glass walls, the river gets pretty high on a
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/albums/72157697108062115>
The young couple who told us said they were rented out at high rents or in
the case of the one they were in they were living there as caretakers but
the owner had only visited once in over a year,the. The couple had Eastern
European accents.
The river floods at high tides frequently, possibly you noticed vegetation
in the road that is often left at times of high tidal levels.
The road was damp, though there hadn't been any rain in days, so it must
have been from the high tide.
Post by Marland
I don’t know if in the past the basements just got wet and people lived
with it,
Now a lot of those basements will be living space rather than a coal hole.
Yes, indeed.
Post by Marland
Surprising now but that bit of Chiswick became a bit of a backwater after
the LSWR routes were opened both the existing national rail over Barnes
bridge and what is now the District from Richmond to Hammersmith
moved focus away from the river as market gardens around Turnham Green and
Ravenscourt Court Park were built on, though the Hammersmith and Chiswick
which got there from the North London Route got stifled on the way and lost
its passenger service early having run a rail motor through cabbage fields
only to find that the new house owners that took over preferred the LSWR
or trams.
https://goo.gl/images/h22yC2
As a backwater the riverside appealed to arty types.
One of those basements is a museum to William Morris the 19th century
designer of various things who lived in the house above in the 1870’s.
https://williammorrissociety.org
Thanks, no I didn't know that history.
michael adams
2018-05-23 14:29:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Marland
As a backwater the riverside appealed to arty types.
One of those basements is a museum to William Morris the 19th century
designer of various things who lived in the house above in the 1870's.
https://williammorrissociety.org
There are still artists studios in St Peters Wharf. Just around the corner from
Hammersmith Terrace. They hold garage sale type exhibitions every year or
so. Artists more arty types will have heard of such as Victor Passmore,
Eric Ravilious, and Eric Gill (the dog shagger) have lived or worked in the
locality. Among many others. As well as Johnston, Emery Walker who with
J.Cobdon Sanderson set up the Doves Press and Bindery in Doves passage
lived in Hammersmith Terrace. Unfortunately they fell out and in a hissy fit Cobden
Sanderson threw all the matrices for the Doves type into the Thames from
Hammersmith Bridge. Presumably having passed the lead mills on the way.

michael adams

...
michael adams
2018-05-23 14:13:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Marland
Post by Richard J.
Post by Recliner
I was wandering down the Thames the other day, after a tour of Fullers
Brewery, and spotted a blue plaque that really deserves to be in Johnston
https://binged.it/2GBnWms
It is indeed in Johnston font, not that you'd know from the awful Bing
maps, which also gets the road name wrong. It's Hammersmith Terrace
there, not Chiswick Mall.
ISTR there is a marker stone that marks the boundary between Hammersmith
and Chiswick,
Surprisingly nondescript and a bit overshadowed now.
Ahh found a piccy.
http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/2130450
It's a walk I do a couple of time a year as I have rellies living nearby
one of whom does a running / fast walk circuit most days along both banks
using Hammersmith and Barnes bridges, hope I have his energy when I'm 85.
A good many of the properties along there now belong to Russian oligarchs
that have invested the money they have acquired in them and are pricey
even by London standards.
Surprisingly the Chiswick end used to be quite industrial with the Fullers
Brewery being about the last.
The West Middlesex Waterworks complete with its five chimneys abutted right
up the eastern end of Hammersmith Terrace. Traces can be seen in the arched
wall to the side of the alley which is now mostly used by bikes. The entrance
to the Old Ship used to be on a continuation of this alley as there was no river
frontage at that time. Then farther on towards Hammersmith, past Kelmscott
House and the Doves and over the high bridge over the Creek there were the
lead mills. I believe these survived long enough to suffer damage during the blitz
and were subsequently the site of Furnival Gardens; which until the Great West
Road extension was built, stretched all the way up to Hammersmith Town Hall.
Its Father Thames heads now almost totally ignored, situated as they now are
only yards away from the motorway.


michael adams

...
Marland
2018-05-23 19:39:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by michael adams
Post by Marland
Surprisingly the Chiswick end used to be quite industrial with the Fullers
Brewery being about the last.
The West Middlesex Waterworks complete with its five chimneys abutted right
up the eastern end of Hammersmith Terrace. Traces can be seen in the arched
wall to the side of the alley which is now mostly used by bikes. The entrance
to the Old Ship used to be on a continuation of this alley as there was no river
frontage at that time. Then farther on towards Hammersmith, past Kelmscott
House and the Doves and over the high bridge over the Creek ,
So others can place it ,it may be worth mentioning the Creek was where
Stamford Brook met the Thames.
You can still see an outfall but the last open vestiges of the Brook and
Hammersmith Creek were covered over
In the 40’s.
For most the the only reminder it ever it existed is in the name of the
Station between Turnham Green and Ravenscourt Park on the District line
One of London’s lost rivers.
http://www.londonslostrivers.com/stamford-brook.html

GH
Charles Ellson
2018-05-23 20:06:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Marland
Post by michael adams
Post by Marland
Surprisingly the Chiswick end used to be quite industrial with the Fullers
Brewery being about the last.
The West Middlesex Waterworks complete with its five chimneys abutted right
up the eastern end of Hammersmith Terrace. Traces can be seen in the arched
wall to the side of the alley which is now mostly used by bikes. The entrance
to the Old Ship used to be on a continuation of this alley as there was no river
frontage at that time. Then farther on towards Hammersmith, past Kelmscott
House and the Doves and over the high bridge over the Creek ,
So others can place it ,it may be worth mentioning the Creek was where
Stamford Brook met the Thames.
You can still see an outfall but the last open vestiges of the Brook and
Hammersmith Creek were covered over
In the 40’s.
For most the the only reminder it ever it existed is in the name of the
Station between Turnham Green and Ravenscourt Park on the District line
One of London’s lost rivers.
http://www.londonslostrivers.com/stamford-brook.html
Stamford Bridge (or strictly the grassy bit in Walham Green nearby)
might have a more widespread group of people aware of its location.
Basil Jet
2018-05-23 20:21:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Charles Ellson
Post by Marland
So others can place it ,it may be worth mentioning the Creek was where
Stamford Brook met the Thames.
You can still see an outfall but the last open vestiges of the Brook and
Hammersmith Creek were covered over
In the 40’s.
For most the the only reminder it ever it existed is in the name of the
Station between Turnham Green and Ravenscourt Park on the District line
One of London’s lost rivers.
http://www.londonslostrivers.com/stamford-brook.html
Stamford Bridge (or strictly the grassy bit in Walham Green nearby)
might have a more widespread group of people aware of its location.
Stamford Bridge is over Counter's Creek, and is nothing to do with
Stamford Brook, or Stamford Hill for that matter.
Charles Ellson
2018-05-23 22:38:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Basil Jet
Post by Charles Ellson
Post by Marland
So others can place it ,it may be worth mentioning the Creek was where
Stamford Brook met the Thames.
You can still see an outfall but the last open vestiges of the Brook and
Hammersmith Creek were covered over
In the 40’s.
For most the the only reminder it ever it existed is in the name of the
Station between Turnham Green and Ravenscourt Park on the District line
One of London’s lost rivers.
http://www.londonslostrivers.com/stamford-brook.html
Stamford Bridge (or strictly the grassy bit in Walham Green nearby)
might have a more widespread group of people aware of its location.
Stamford Bridge is over Counter's Creek,
/Billingswell Ditch/Pool's Creek/Kensington Canal
Post by Basil Jet
and is nothing to do with
Stamford Brook,
apart from each coming down opposite sides of Wormwood Scrubs.
Loading Image...
Post by Basil Jet
or Stamford Hill for that matter.
Bugger! Yes, three different sandy fords.

s***@googlemail.com
2018-05-22 18:25:27 UTC
Permalink
I was able to buy a copy of the font at an open day at the Museum depot some years ago.
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