Discussion:
Pointless footbridge in Poplar
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Basil Jet
2019-09-17 00:50:14 UTC
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https://goo.gl/maps/9BvVTUQWUswc3HXC9

Why is it there?
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Jon Hassell - 1978 - Vernal Equinox
Graeme Wall
2019-09-17 06:40:37 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
https://goo.gl/maps/9BvVTUQWUswc3HXC9
Why is it there?
Somewere for the troll to live.
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Graeme Wall
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David Cantrell
2019-09-17 09:18:30 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
https://goo.gl/maps/9BvVTUQWUswc3HXC9
Why is it there?
I would assume that the road layout has changed since it was built and
the west-bound carriageway of East India Dock Rd used to be wider.
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Robin9
2019-09-17 13:51:59 UTC
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The Google map must be at least 20 years old because the trunk road
is labelled A102. When the erroneously named M11 Link Road was opened
in August 1999 (if memory serves correctly) the northern section of the
A102 became part of the A12.

The footbridge is long gone and I don't remember it at all even though

used to drive under it frequently and, when I worked in Dartford, ten
times a week


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Robin9
Someone Somewhere
2019-09-17 15:58:18 UTC
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Post by Robin9
The Google map must be at least 20 years old because the trunk road
is labelled A102. When the erroneously named M11 Link Road was opened
in August 1999 (if memory serves correctly) the northern section of the
A102 became part of the A12.
The footbridge is long gone and I don't remember it at all even though I
used to drive under it frequently and, when I worked in Dartford, ten
times a week.
Well it's shown in this image dated August 2018:

https://goo.gl/maps/zkzcYbmyGz1FSqcS8
Robin9
2019-09-18 08:47:07 UTC
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On 17/09/2019 14:51, Robin9 wrote:-
The Google map must be at least 20 years old because the trunk road
is labelled A102. When the erroneously named M11 Link Road was opened
in August 1999 (if memory serves correctly) the northern section o
the
A102 became part of the A12.
The footbridge is long gone and I don't remember it at all even thoug
I
used to drive under it frequently and, when I worked in Dartford, ten
times a week.
-
https://goo.gl/maps/zkzcYbmyGz1FSqcS8
You've got me thinking. I'll go and have a look and a good walk round
just to be sure


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Robin9
Robin
2019-09-17 16:12:03 UTC
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Post by Robin9
The Google map must be at least 20 years old because the trunk road
is labelled A102. When the erroneously named M11 Link Road was opened
in August 1999 (if memory serves correctly) the northern section of the
A102 became part of the A12.
Not quite. The Blackwall Tunnel Northern Approach Road remained the
A102 from just north of the roundabout.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A12_road_(England)

And thank you (not) for reminding me of the days of the A102(M) with a
60 mph limit :(
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Robin
reply-to address is (intended to be) valid
David Cantrell
2019-09-18 09:34:45 UTC
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Post by Robin9
The footbridge is long gone and I don't remember it at all even though I
used to drive under it frequently and, when I worked in Dartford, ten
times a week.
You don't remember hundreds of other completely irrelevant structures
that you passed either.
--
David Cantrell | http://www.cantrell.org.uk/david

Feature: an incorrectly implemented bug
Peter Able
2019-09-17 15:51:58 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
https://goo.gl/maps/9BvVTUQWUswc3HXC9
Why is it there?
It has a no cycling sign at its start, so maybe, at least nowadays, some
safe(r) path for pedestrians?

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@51.5114761,-0.0072596,3a,27y,147.77h,83.03t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s6WAO2VX7HoN_erwyke7A2g!2e0!7i16384!8i8192

PA
Jarle Hammen Knudsen
2019-09-20 20:27:36 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
https://goo.gl/maps/9BvVTUQWUswc3HXC9
Why is it there?
Pedestrian access to the bus stop.
--
jhk
Peter Able
2019-09-21 15:36:00 UTC
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Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
Post by Basil Jet
https://goo.gl/maps/9BvVTUQWUswc3HXC9
Why is it there?
Pedestrian access to the bus stop.
There is more direct, signed, line-of-sight and easier pedestrian access
to the bus stop. See my previous link.

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@51.5114761,-0.0072596,3a,27y,147.77h,83.03t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s6WAO2VX7HoN_erwyke7A2g!2e0!7i16384!8i8192

PA
Robin9
2019-09-22 09:18:11 UTC
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I had a stroll round there yesterday and a look at this bridge. I thin

David Cantrell in Post 3 made the best guess. The footbridge is n
longer
a stand-alone structure. It is now attached to the pavement and roa
which
is why I thought it had gone completely..



--
Robin9
Someone Somewhere
2019-09-23 06:17:38 UTC
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I had a stroll round there yesterday and a look at this bridge. I think
David Cantrell in Post 3 made the best guess. The footbridge is no
longer
a stand-alone structure. It is now attached to the pavement and road
which
is why I thought it had gone completely..
What is it for though?
Robin9
2019-09-23 09:02:58 UTC
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My guess is that originally the pavement stopped where the traffi
light
is situated and that a footbridge over the A102 was constructed. I also
guess that at some stage TfL decided to move the bus stop a few yards
west of the traffic light to give buses an advantage over traffic held
by red signals. (typical TfL) and that as part and parcel of that they
extended the pavement, making the footbridge redundant


--
Robin9
Roland Perry
2019-09-23 10:18:16 UTC
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My guess is that originally the pavement stopped where the traffic
light
is situated and that a footbridge over the A102 was constructed. I also
guess that at some stage TfL decided to move the bus stop a few yards
west of the traffic light to give buses an advantage over traffic held
by red signals. (typical TfL) and that as part and parcel of that they
extended the pavement, making the footbridge redundant.
And it's no doubt cheaper to just leave it there, than demolish it.
--
Roland Perry
Basil Jet
2019-09-23 13:00:55 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
My guess is that originally the pavement stopped where the traffic
light
is situated and that a footbridge over the A102 was constructed. I also
guess that at some stage TfL decided to move the bus stop a few yards
west of the traffic light to give buses an advantage over traffic held
by red signals. (typical TfL) and that as part and parcel of that they
extended the pavement, making the footbridge redundant.
And it's no doubt cheaper to just leave it there, than demolish it.
Why spoil all the fun of the footpath enthusiasts who fly in to
photograph it?
--
Basil Jet recently enjoyed listening to
Pulp - Countdown
tim...
2019-09-25 13:41:57 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
My guess is that originally the pavement stopped where the traffic
light
is situated and that a footbridge over the A102 was constructed. I also
guess that at some stage TfL decided to move the bus stop a few yards
west of the traffic light to give buses an advantage over traffic held
by red signals. (typical TfL) and that as part and parcel of that they
extended the pavement, making the footbridge redundant.
And it's no doubt cheaper to just leave it there, than demolish it.
I imagine not having to annoy 100,000 motorists by closing the road whilst
they do it, ranks higher than the cost

tim

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