Discussion:
Waterloo pl 20-24 building pictures
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Recliner
2016-12-11 13:12:34 UTC
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I took some pictures on Friday of the rebuilding work on Waterloo
platforms 20-24, formerly used by Eurostar:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/albums/72157673819851723

You can see how the buffer stops are being moved back 50m, to make
space for a new concourse and gate line (of course, e* trains are much
longer than any trains that will use these shortened platforms in the
future). The ramps at the platform ends are being demolished. The old
Eurostar concourse was at the lower level, which I believe will now be
converted into more retail space.

You can also see how the Eurostar platforms are a couple of metres
higher than the old ones, and I think this will remain the case.
Indeed, they may even be raised a bit more, to British rather than
European platform height, to facilitate step-free boarding. The bridge
over the new retail space, from the old concourse to the new one
(built over the eastern ends of the e* platforms), will therefore
slope up, which you can just about see in NR's artist's impression.

More surprisingly, I saw them laboriously removing and craning out
some of the large glass panes in the canopy. I'm guessing that this is
to get better access to the platforms during the construction work,
unless it's to create a new northern exit. Does anyone know better?

There is a tight deadline for this phase of the work, as platforms
21-24 will need to be used for 23 days in August 2017; they'll then be
closed again, till the project concludes at the end of 2018. Platform
20 will permanently return to use from February 2017, accessed as
before via platform 19.
NY
2016-12-11 13:35:54 UTC
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Post by Recliner
I took some pictures on Friday of the rebuilding work on Waterloo
Is the intention to use the new high-numbered platforms for the Reading and
the Windsor Riverside trains again, as they used to be before Eurostar
nobbled that space?
Recliner
2016-12-11 14:51:37 UTC
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Post by NY
Post by Recliner
I took some pictures on Friday of the rebuilding work on Waterloo
Is the intention to use the new high-numbered platforms for the Reading and
the Windsor Riverside trains again, as they used to be before Eurostar
nobbled that space?
Yes, but I think that only platforms 20-21 existed originally; 22-24 were
added for Eurostar. So SWT will eventually get three more platforms than
existed pre-Eurostar.
Ken Ward
2016-12-11 16:01:43 UTC
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On 11/12/2016 13:12, Recliner wrote:
<Snip>
Post by Recliner
You can also see how the Eurostar platforms are a couple of metres
higher than the old ones, and I think this will remain the case.
Indeed, they may even be raised a bit more, to British rather than
European platform height, to facilitate step-free boarding.
<Snip>


Is there really a British Standard for platform height?
I'm pretty sure I've never met two alike.

KW.
Recliner
2016-12-11 16:26:04 UTC
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Post by Ken Ward
<Snip>
Post by Recliner
You can also see how the Eurostar platforms are a couple of metres
higher than the old ones, and I think this will remain the case.
Indeed, they may even be raised a bit more, to British rather than
European platform height, to facilitate step-free boarding.
<Snip>
Is there really a British Standard for platform height?
I'm pretty sure I've never met two alike.
Yes:

"For new platforms and alterations (as defined) to existing platforms, the
height at the edge of the platform shall be 915 mm (within a tolerance of
+0 mm, -25 mm)."

Page 18 in
http://www.rssb.co.uk/rgs/standards/GIGN7616%20Iss%202.pdf
Ken Ward
2016-12-11 20:21:21 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Post by Ken Ward
<Snip>
Post by Recliner
You can also see how the Eurostar platforms are a couple of metres
higher than the old ones, and I think this will remain the case.
Indeed, they may even be raised a bit more, to British rather than
European platform height, to facilitate step-free boarding.
<Snip>
Is there really a British Standard for platform height?
I'm pretty sure I've never met two alike.
"For new platforms and alterations (as defined) to existing platforms, the
height at the edge of the platform shall be 915 mm (within a tolerance of
+0 mm, -25 mm)."
Page 18 in
http://www.rssb.co.uk/rgs/standards/GIGN7616%20Iss%202.pdf
That's good to know. A shame some of the extreme platforms don't warrant
some fixing. The bay at Whithaven needs wooden steps.

KW.
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2016-12-11 17:31:11 UTC
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In article
Post by Recliner
Post by NY
Post by Recliner
I took some pictures on Friday of the rebuilding work on Waterloo
Is the intention to use the new high-numbered platforms for the
Reading and the Windsor Riverside trains again, as they used to be
before Eurostar nobbled that space?
Yes, but I think that only platforms 20-21 existed originally; 22-24 were
added for Eurostar. So SWT will eventually get three more platforms than
existed pre-Eurostar.
Indeed so. There was a rail yard under part of the Eurostar platforms which
included the Armstrong lift from a siding in the Waterloo and City Line.
--
Colin Rosenstiel
Offramp
2016-12-12 00:49:33 UTC
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Very good. Thank you.
Basil Jet
2016-12-12 03:07:35 UTC
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Post by Recliner
I took some pictures on Friday of the rebuilding work on Waterloo
https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/albums/72157673819851723
Thanks.

I am amused by the massive girder with "DO NOT REMOVE" sprayed on it. It
suggests that the workers are just going around demolishing random stuff
without any plan.
Tim Watts
2016-12-12 10:43:39 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
I took some pictures on Friday of the rebuilding work on Waterloo
https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/albums/72157673819851723
Thanks.
I am amused by the massive girder with "DO NOT REMOVE" sprayed on it. It
suggests that the workers are just going around demolishing random stuff
without any plan.
Never hurst to have a failsafe :)

My surgeon, when fixing a hernia, drew a massive arrow on one leg with a
magic marker, whilst I was still awake to confirm which bit he was
supposed to be fixing, before I was wheeled in. Makes sense as he was
spending all day doing those...
Roland Perry
2016-12-12 12:00:34 UTC
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Post by Tim Watts
Post by Basil Jet
I am amused by the massive girder with "DO NOT REMOVE" sprayed on it. It
suggests that the workers are just going around demolishing random stuff
without any plan.
Never hurst to have a failsafe :)
My surgeon, when fixing a hernia, drew a massive arrow on one leg with
a magic marker, whilst I was still awake to confirm which bit he was
supposed to be fixing, before I was wheeled in. Makes sense as he was
spending all day doing those...
My understanding is that these days at least three people check that the
surgeon is about to cut the correct leg off the correct patient.
Including asking the patient.
--
Roland Perry
Graeme Wall
2016-12-12 12:47:11 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
Post by Tim Watts
Post by Basil Jet
I am amused by the massive girder with "DO NOT REMOVE" sprayed on it. It
suggests that the workers are just going around demolishing random stuff
without any plan.
Never hurst to have a failsafe :)
My surgeon, when fixing a hernia, drew a massive arrow on one leg with
a magic marker, whilst I was still awake to confirm which bit he was
supposed to be fixing, before I was wheeled in. Makes sense as he was
spending all day doing those...
My understanding is that these days at least three people check that the
surgeon is about to cut the correct leg off the correct patient.
Including asking the patient.
Wonder if they did that on Victory…
--
Graeme Wall
This account not read.
Jarle Hammen Knudsen
2016-12-12 13:44:21 UTC
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Post by Tim Watts
My surgeon, when fixing a hernia, drew a massive arrow on one leg with a
magic marker, whilst I was still awake to confirm which bit he was
supposed to be fixing, before I was wheeled in. Makes sense as he was
spending all day doing those...
This seems to be the norm here in Norway too. My surgeon visited in
the morning before I was drugged to put a big X on the correct
shoulder.
--
jhk
m***@hotmail.com
2016-12-12 21:55:18 UTC
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On Mon, 12 Dec 2016 14:44:21 +0100, Jarle Hammen Knudsen
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
Post by Tim Watts
My surgeon, when fixing a hernia, drew a massive arrow on one leg with a
magic marker, whilst I was still awake to confirm which bit he was
supposed to be fixing, before I was wheeled in. Makes sense as he was
spending all day doing those...
This seems to be the norm here in Norway too. My surgeon visited in
the morning before I was drugged to put a big X on the correct
shoulder.
When I had my broken shoulder fixed the anaesthetist was the one with
the marker but he saw the bruising and decided that it was obvious
where the problem was.
Basil Jet
2016-12-13 01:14:35 UTC
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Post by m***@hotmail.com
When I had my broken shoulder fixed the anaesthetist was the one with
the marker but he saw the bruising and decided that it was obvious
where the problem was.
...but fortunately he didn't amputate your head! ;-)
James Heaton
2016-12-12 21:48:28 UTC
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Post by Tim Watts
Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
I took some pictures on Friday of the rebuilding work on Waterloo
https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/albums/72157673819851723
Thanks.
I am amused by the massive girder with "DO NOT REMOVE" sprayed on it. It
suggests that the workers are just going around demolishing random stuff
without any plan.
Never hurst to have a failsafe :)
My surgeon, when fixing a hernia, drew a massive arrow on one leg with a
magic marker, whilst I was still awake to confirm which bit he was
supposed to be fixing, before I was wheeled in. Makes sense as he was
spending all day doing those...
Me too. In fluorescent pink magic marker which was a bu88er to get off.

Not what you want as an 8yo who is already sore about not being able to play
rugby for some weeks!

James
Chris J Dixon
2016-12-13 08:11:40 UTC
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Post by Tim Watts
Never hurst to have a failsafe :)
My surgeon, when fixing a hernia, drew a massive arrow on one leg with a
magic marker, whilst I was still awake to confirm which bit he was
supposed to be fixing, before I was wheeled in. Makes sense as he was
spending all day doing those...
My arrows were a symmetrical pair.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK
***@cdixon.me.uk

Plant amazing Acers.
Basil Jet
2016-12-13 08:39:49 UTC
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Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Tim Watts
Never hurst to have a failsafe :)
My surgeon, when fixing a hernia, drew a massive arrow on one leg with a
magic marker, whilst I was still awake to confirm which bit he was
supposed to be fixing, before I was wheeled in. Makes sense as he was
spending all day doing those...
My arrows were a symmetrical pair.
Hopefully they weren't upside down, or the surgeon might have cut off
your body and just left your legs.
Chris J Dixon
2016-12-13 12:17:20 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Tim Watts
Never hurst to have a failsafe :)
My surgeon, when fixing a hernia, drew a massive arrow on one leg with a
magic marker, whilst I was still awake to confirm which bit he was
supposed to be fixing, before I was wheeled in. Makes sense as he was
spending all day doing those...
My arrows were a symmetrical pair.
Hopefully they weren't upside down, or the surgeon might have cut off
your body and just left your legs.
No wonder I left feeling light headed. ;-)

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK
***@cdixon.me.uk

Plant amazing Acers.
burfordTjustice
2016-12-13 15:55:36 UTC
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On Sun, 11 Dec 2016 13:12:34 +0000
Subject: Waterloo pl 20-24 building pictures
Date: Sun, 11 Dec 2016 13:12:34 +0000
User-Agent: ForteAgent/7.20.32.1218
Newsgroups: uk.transport.london,uk.railway
Organization: A noiseless patient Spider
Do those pictures turn you on?

Stupid shit.

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