Discussion:
Blue Lights
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h***@yahoo.co.uk
2016-12-14 03:14:51 UTC
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Hello,

I saw on a moving 96ts the other day that one of the rail cars had a
blue light on.

The interesting thing was that the train did not extend its dwell time
beyond what would be normal.

Does the blue light indicate a door fault? I'm guessing, were that the
case, that the line controller ordered the driver to engage the
interlocking. But even if there was a door fault, would not the line
controller have ordered the driver to dump the load?

I saw this train during non-peak hours, BTW.
Basil Jet
2016-12-14 06:41:26 UTC
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Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Hello,
I saw on a moving 96ts the other day that one of the rail cars had a
blue light on.
The interesting thing was that the train did not extend its dwell time
beyond what would be normal.
Does the blue light indicate a door fault? I'm guessing, were that the
case, that the line controller ordered the driver to engage the
interlocking. But even if there was a door fault, would not the line
controller have ordered the driver to dump the load?
I saw this train during non-peak hours, BTW.
I think it means it's a de-icing train.
h***@yahoo.co.uk
2016-12-14 15:25:00 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Hello,
I saw on a moving 96ts the other day that one of the rail cars had a
blue light on.
The interesting thing was that the train did not extend its dwell time
beyond what would be normal.
Does the blue light indicate a door fault? I'm guessing, were that the
case, that the line controller ordered the driver to engage the
interlocking. But even if there was a door fault, would not the line
controller have ordered the driver to dump the load?
I saw this train during non-peak hours, BTW.
I think it means it's a de-icing train.
Got it. If it were a door fault, then would the red guard light be flashing?

What about in the case of a passenger alarm?
Steve Lewis
2016-12-14 21:12:10 UTC
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If the doors are proved closed, the exterior orange light will be off, else it will be on. Away from a platform, the train management system will be of more use.
h***@yahoo.co.uk
2016-12-14 22:24:50 UTC
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Post by Steve Lewis
If the doors are proved closed, the exterior orange light will be off, else it will be on.
Yes, I know that. But what I am asking is that if there is a door fault,
if the guard light will give any other indication.

Also, is there a particular indication on the guard light if somebody
pulls a passenger alarm?

Away from a platform, the train management system will be of more use.

Are you referring to the onboard computer?
burfordTjustice
2016-12-15 12:30:45 UTC
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On Wed, 14 Dec 2016 22:24:50 +0000
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Yes, I know that.
Then ring them up and ask your stupid fucking questions...

Jarle Hammen Knudsen
2016-12-14 15:23:56 UTC
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Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Hello,
I saw on a moving 96ts the other day that one of the rail cars had a
blue light on.
The interesting thing was that the train did not extend its dwell time
beyond what would be normal.
Does the blue light indicate a door fault? I'm guessing, were that the
case, that the line controller ordered the driver to engage the
interlocking. But even if there was a door fault, would not the line
controller have ordered the driver to dump the load?
I saw this train during non-peak hours, BTW.
http://www.version3point1.co.uk/blog/2015/2/6/seeing-blue

But why is the light necessary and whom is it intended for?
--
jhk
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