Discussion:
Get used to the black nose!
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Recliner
2016-12-10 16:42:35 UTC
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The first Elizabeth line train arrives in London:

<https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CzPsRPDXcAM50z1?format=jpg&name=large>
d***@yahoo.co.uk
2016-12-10 18:32:37 UTC
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On Sat, 10 Dec 2016 16:42:35 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
<https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CzPsRPDXcAM50z1?format=jpg&name=large>
How long before they acquire a nickname like Pandas or a type of dog.

G.Harman
Basil Jet
2016-12-10 20:59:11 UTC
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On Sat, 10 Dec 2016 16:42:35 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
<https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CzPsRPDXcAM50z1?format=jpg&name=large>
How long before they acquire a nickname like Pandas or a type of dog.
I've been thinking that the London Overground lines should all be named
after patterned animals and should have liveries to match. Zebra,
Dalmation, Peacock, Frisian, Leopard, Ladybird, Tiger, Giraffe, Cobra.
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2016-12-10 20:15:29 UTC
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Post by Recliner
<https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CzPsRPDXcAM50z1?format=jpg&name=large>
Pictures of the train being delivered were tweeted by @StevenQuy yesterday,
showing 67013 towing the unit with translator vans.
--
Colin Rosenstiel
Jarle Hammen Knudsen
2016-12-11 14:31:01 UTC
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On Sat, 10 Dec 2016 16:42:35 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
<https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CzPsRPDXcAM50z1?format=jpg&name=large>
Why black ends? Are there any colours with lower visibility? Most
trains use yellow, I thought that was a safety regulation.
--
jhk
Recliner
2016-12-11 14:54:15 UTC
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On Sat, 10 Dec 2016 16:42:35 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
<https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CzPsRPDXcAM50z1?format=jpg&name=large>
Why black ends? Are there any colours with lower visibility? Most
trains use yellow, I thought that was a safety regulation.
It was, but no longer applies to trains with bright headlights. I'm sure
the designers are trying to make the most of their new freedom to use any
colours they like.
Jarle Hammen Knudsen
2016-12-11 17:17:26 UTC
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On Sun, 11 Dec 2016 14:54:15 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
On Sat, 10 Dec 2016 16:42:35 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
<https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CzPsRPDXcAM50z1?format=jpg&name=large>
Why black ends? Are there any colours with lower visibility? Most
trains use yellow, I thought that was a safety regulation.
It was, but no longer applies to trains with bright headlights. I'm sure
the designers are trying to make the most of their new freedom to use any
colours they like.
Are such lights required to have a backup power source?
--
jhk
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2016-12-11 18:59:02 UTC
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Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Sun, 11 Dec 2016 14:54:15 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
On Sat, 10 Dec 2016 16:42:35 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
<https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CzPsRPDXcAM50z1?format=jpg&name=large>
Why black ends? Are there any colours with lower visibility? Most
trains use yellow, I thought that was a safety regulation.
It was, but no longer applies to trains with bright headlights. I'm sure
the designers are trying to make the most of their new freedom to use any
colours they like.
Are such lights required to have a backup power source?
Probably but they'll be LEDs these days.
--
Colin Rosenstiel
Recliner
2016-12-11 21:12:11 UTC
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Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Sun, 11 Dec 2016 14:54:15 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
On Sat, 10 Dec 2016 16:42:35 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
<https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CzPsRPDXcAM50z1?format=jpg&name=large>
Why black ends? Are there any colours with lower visibility? Most
trains use yellow, I thought that was a safety regulation.
It was, but no longer applies to trains with bright headlights. I'm sure
the designers are trying to make the most of their new freedom to use any
colours they like.
Are such lights required to have a backup power source?
Probably but they'll be LEDs these days.
Yes, each headlight is made up of a matrix of multiple LEDs.
Neil Williams
2016-12-11 22:28:27 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Yes, each headlight is made up of a matrix of multiple LEDs.
The headlights (or as an absolute minimum the marker lights) will
continue to run off the batteries on all modern MUs, in any case,
whether LED or not.

But even so, the yellow end exists to enhance visibility of a moving
train to the likes of track workers. If it isn't moving, it doesn't
pose a threat in the same way.

Neil
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Neil Williams
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r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2016-12-11 21:46:37 UTC
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Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Sun, 11 Dec 2016 14:54:15 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
On Sat, 10 Dec 2016 16:42:35 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
<https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CzPsRPDXcAM50z1?format=jpg&name=large>
Why black ends? Are there any colours with lower visibility? Most
trains use yellow, I thought that was a safety regulation.
It was, but no longer applies to trains with bright headlights. I'm
sure the designers are trying to make the most of their new freedom to
use any colours they like.
Are such lights required to have a backup power source?
Probably but they'll be LEDs these days.
Yes, each headlight is made up of a matrix of multiple LEDs.
Almost no LED lights have single LEDs!
--
Colin Rosenstiel
Recliner
2016-12-11 21:57:34 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Sun, 11 Dec 2016 14:54:15 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
On Sat, 10 Dec 2016 16:42:35 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
<https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CzPsRPDXcAM50z1?format=jpg&name=large>
Why black ends? Are there any colours with lower visibility? Most
trains use yellow, I thought that was a safety regulation.
It was, but no longer applies to trains with bright headlights. I'm
sure the designers are trying to make the most of their new freedom to
use any colours they like.
Are such lights required to have a backup power source?
Probably but they'll be LEDs these days.
Yes, each headlight is made up of a matrix of multiple LEDs.
Almost no LED lights have single LEDs!
True. I was just emphasising the redundancy aspect. As for a backup
'power source', I assume a train travelling forward is bound to be under
power.
h***@yahoo.co.uk
2016-12-11 22:44:07 UTC
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I want to see one in completely yellow livery and I want it to carry the
name "Mr Banana."
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2016-12-12 00:21:32 UTC
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Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
I want to see one in completely yellow livery and I want it to carry
the name "Mr Banana."
Photoshop is your friend.
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Colin Rosenstiel
Jarle Hammen Knudsen
2016-12-12 13:37:02 UTC
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On Sun, 11 Dec 2016 21:57:34 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
In article
Post by Recliner
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Sun, 11 Dec 2016 14:54:15 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
On Sat, 10 Dec 2016 16:42:35 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
<https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CzPsRPDXcAM50z1?format=jpg&name=large>
Why black ends? Are there any colours with lower visibility? Most
trains use yellow, I thought that was a safety regulation.
It was, but no longer applies to trains with bright headlights. I'm
sure the designers are trying to make the most of their new freedom to
use any colours they like.
Are such lights required to have a backup power source?
Probably but they'll be LEDs these days.
Yes, each headlight is made up of a matrix of multiple LEDs.
Almost no LED lights have single LEDs!
True. I was just emphasising the redundancy aspect. As for a backup
'power source', I assume a train travelling forward is bound to be under
power.
Emergency brakes are applied automatically when power is lost? Also,
aren't diesels allowed on electrified lines?
--
jhk
Recliner
2016-12-12 14:29:20 UTC
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On Mon, 12 Dec 2016 14:37:02 +0100, Jarle Hammen Knudsen
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Sun, 11 Dec 2016 21:57:34 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
In article
Post by Recliner
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Sun, 11 Dec 2016 14:54:15 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
On Sat, 10 Dec 2016 16:42:35 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
<https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CzPsRPDXcAM50z1?format=jpg&name=large>
Why black ends? Are there any colours with lower visibility? Most
trains use yellow, I thought that was a safety regulation.
It was, but no longer applies to trains with bright headlights. I'm
sure the designers are trying to make the most of their new freedom to
use any colours they like.
Are such lights required to have a backup power source?
Probably but they'll be LEDs these days.
Yes, each headlight is made up of a matrix of multiple LEDs.
Almost no LED lights have single LEDs!
True. I was just emphasising the redundancy aspect. As for a backup
'power source', I assume a train travelling forward is bound to be under
power.
Emergency brakes are applied automatically when power is lost? Also,
aren't diesels allowed on electrified lines?
Of course they are, but if they lost their electrical power they'd
soon come to a stop.

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