Discussion:
Hackney Chord: still in use?
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r***@ntlworld.com
2017-05-10 10:13:13 UTC
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When, many, many years ago British Rail decided to close
Broad Street Station, as a sop to commuters coming via
Canonbury Tunnel, they built a chord in Hackney to enable
trains to run from the North London Line to Liverpool Street
during the morning rush hour. I assume these rush hour
services were abandoned decades ago.

I notice that the spur is still there and that the rails -
and absence of rust - suggest it is still occasionally
utilised. Does anyone know what it used for?
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-05-10 13:26:00 UTC
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Post by r***@ntlworld.com
When, many, many years ago British Rail decided to close
Broad Street Station, as a sop to commuters coming via
Canonbury Tunnel, they built a chord in Hackney to enable
trains to run from the North London Line to Liverpool Street
during the morning rush hour. I assume these rush hour
services were abandoned decades ago.
I notice that the spur is still there and that the rails -
and absence of rust - suggest it is still occasionally
utilised. Does anyone know what it used for?
It's the Graham Road curve, between Reading Lane Junction on West Anglia and
Navarino Road Junction on the North London. As far as I know it's only used
for non-passenger moves.
--
Colin Rosenstiel
r***@ntlworld.com
2017-05-10 15:57:02 UTC
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Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by r***@ntlworld.com
When, many, many years ago British Rail decided to close
Broad Street Station, as a sop to commuters coming via
Canonbury Tunnel, they built a chord in Hackney to enable
trains to run from the North London Line to Liverpool Street
during the morning rush hour. I assume these rush hour
services were abandoned decades ago.
I notice that the spur is still there and that the rails -
and absence of rust - suggest it is still occasionally
utilised. Does anyone know what it used for?
It's the Graham Road curve, between Reading Lane Junction on West Anglia and
Navarino Road Junction on the North London. As far as I know it's only used
for non-passenger moves.
--
Colin Rosenstiel
Non-passenger as in freight or as in empty coaching stock?
h***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-05-10 18:04:38 UTC
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Post by r***@ntlworld.com
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by r***@ntlworld.com
When, many, many years ago British Rail decided to close
Broad Street Station, as a sop to commuters coming via
Canonbury Tunnel, they built a chord in Hackney to enable
trains to run from the North London Line to Liverpool Street
during the morning rush hour. I assume these rush hour
services were abandoned decades ago.
I notice that the spur is still there and that the rails -
and absence of rust - suggest it is still occasionally
utilised. Does anyone know what it used for?
It's the Graham Road curve, between Reading Lane Junction on West Anglia and
Navarino Road Junction on the North London. As far as I know it's only used
for non-passenger moves.
--
Colin Rosenstiel
Non-passenger as in freight or as in empty coaching stock?
ECS.
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-05-10 23:37:48 UTC
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On Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 2:26:05 PM UTC+1,
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by r***@ntlworld.com
When, many, many years ago British Rail decided to close
Broad Street Station, as a sop to commuters coming via
Canonbury Tunnel, they built a chord in Hackney to enable
trains to run from the North London Line to Liverpool Street
during the morning rush hour. I assume these rush hour
services were abandoned decades ago.
I notice that the spur is still there and that the rails -
and absence of rust - suggest it is still occasionally
utilised. Does anyone know what it used for?
It's the Graham Road curve, between Reading Lane Junction on West
Anglia and Navarino Road Junction on the North London. As far as I
know it's only used for non-passenger moves.
Non-passenger as in freight or as in empty coaching stock?
ECS.
I was careful in my wording because I'm not sure if there are moves other
than NR test trains. Which TOC would use it for ECS moves?
--
Colin Rosenstiel
r***@ntlworld.com
2017-05-11 08:25:59 UTC
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Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
On Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 2:26:05 PM UTC+1,
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by r***@ntlworld.com
When, many, many years ago British Rail decided to close
Broad Street Station, as a sop to commuters coming via
Canonbury Tunnel, they built a chord in Hackney to enable
trains to run from the North London Line to Liverpool Street
during the morning rush hour. I assume these rush hour
services were abandoned decades ago.
I notice that the spur is still there and that the rails -
and absence of rust - suggest it is still occasionally
utilised. Does anyone know what it used for?
It's the Graham Road curve, between Reading Lane Junction on West
Anglia and Navarino Road Junction on the North London. As far as I
know it's only used for non-passenger moves.
Non-passenger as in freight or as in empty coaching stock?
ECS.
I was careful in my wording because I'm not sure if there are moves other
than NR test trains. Which TOC would use it for ECS moves?
--
Colin Rosenstiel
Probably none! At least as far as I know, but then I don't
know who does use this chord or why.
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-05-11 08:36:26 UTC
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On Thursday, May 11, 2017 at 12:37:49 AM UTC+1,
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
On Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 2:26:05 PM UTC+1,
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by r***@ntlworld.com
When, many, many years ago British Rail decided to close
Broad Street Station, as a sop to commuters coming via
Canonbury Tunnel, they built a chord in Hackney to enable
trains to run from the North London Line to Liverpool Street
during the morning rush hour. I assume these rush hour
services were abandoned decades ago.
I notice that the spur is still there and that the rails -
and absence of rust - suggest it is still occasionally
utilised. Does anyone know what it used for?
It's the Graham Road curve, between Reading Lane Junction on West
Anglia and Navarino Road Junction on the North London. As far as I
know it's only used for non-passenger moves.
Non-passenger as in freight or as in empty coaching stock?
ECS.
I was careful in my wording because I'm not sure if there are moves
other than NR test trains. Which TOC would use it for ECS moves?
Probably none! At least as far as I know, but then I don't
know who does use this chord or why.
As was said, consistent with my observations, the rails are shiny enough to
imply at least daily use.
--
Colin Rosenstiel
Optimist
2017-05-11 08:49:39 UTC
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Post by r***@ntlworld.com
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
On Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 2:26:05 PM UTC+1,
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by r***@ntlworld.com
When, many, many years ago British Rail decided to close
Broad Street Station, as a sop to commuters coming via
Canonbury Tunnel, they built a chord in Hackney to enable
trains to run from the North London Line to Liverpool Street
during the morning rush hour. I assume these rush hour
services were abandoned decades ago.
I notice that the spur is still there and that the rails -
and absence of rust - suggest it is still occasionally
utilised. Does anyone know what it used for?
It's the Graham Road curve, between Reading Lane Junction on West
Anglia and Navarino Road Junction on the North London. As far as I
know it's only used for non-passenger moves.
Non-passenger as in freight or as in empty coaching stock?
ECS.
I was careful in my wording because I'm not sure if there are moves other
than NR test trains. Which TOC would use it for ECS moves?
--
Colin Rosenstiel
Probably none! At least as far as I know, but then I don't
know who does use this chord or why.
Reminiscent of Jimmy Durante


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r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-05-11 09:14:36 UTC
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Post by Optimist
On Thursday, May 11, 2017 at 12:37:49 AM UTC+1,
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
On Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 2:26:05 PM UTC+1,
In article
Post by r***@ntlworld.com
When, many, many years ago British Rail decided to close
Broad Street Station, as a sop to commuters coming via
Canonbury Tunnel, they built a chord in Hackney to enable
trains to run from the North London Line to Liverpool Street
during the morning rush hour. I assume these rush hour
services were abandoned decades ago.
I notice that the spur is still there and that the rails -
and absence of rust - suggest it is still occasionally
utilised. Does anyone know what it used for?
It's the Graham Road curve, between Reading Lane Junction on West
Anglia and Navarino Road Junction on the North London. As far as I
know it's only used for non-passenger moves.
Non-passenger as in freight or as in empty coaching stock?
ECS.
I was careful in my wording because I'm not sure if there are moves
other than NR test trains. Which TOC would use it for ECS moves?
Probably none! At least as far as I know, but then I don't
know who does use this chord or why.
Reminiscent of Jimmy Durante
http://youtu.be/0Q0Ce6Jjqsk
OK. The only thing to do is some looking up. Real Time Time Trains shows
four movements today, all between Broxbourne Dn Tamp Sdg Gbf and Broxbourne
Dn Tamp Sdg Gbf, all marked (Q) i.e. runs as required. They all run from
Reading Lane Junction to Navarino Road Junction and not in the reverse
direction, with times at Reading Lane of 1336, 1343, 1539 1/2 and 1547.
Anyone know any more?
--
Colin Rosenstiel
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