Discussion:
Loading screen at Shoreditch
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eastender
2017-10-18 19:06:24 UTC
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This new pilot screen at Shoreditch High Street station shows you how
busy each of the carriages are before you board your train. Green means
It's quiet in here, amber means It's getting a bit busy and red means
This is rammed (or words to that effect). Something similar happens on
the new Thameslink trains, although on Thameslink the displays are
inside the carriages, not in the stations.


http://diamondgeezer.blogspot.co.uk/2017/10/orinoco-flow.html
Basil Jet
2017-10-18 21:33:12 UTC
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Post by eastender
This new pilot screen at Shoreditch High Street station shows you how
busy each of the carriages are before you board your train. Green means
It's quiet in here, amber means It's getting a bit busy and red means
This is rammed (or words to that effect). Something similar happens on
the new Thameslink trains, although on Thameslink the displays are
inside the carriages, not in the stations.
http://diamondgeezer.blogspot.co.uk/2017/10/orinoco-flow.html
Odd choice of name... apparently it is supposed to symbolise improving
the flow of information, but the Orinoco is perhaps best known for being
the only major river where the flow bifurcates and so you have no idea
where a molecule of water which starts at the source is going to end up.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casiquiare_canal
David Cantrell
2017-10-19 12:20:11 UTC
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Post by eastender
This new pilot screen at Shoreditch High Street station shows you how
busy each of the carriages are before you board your train. Green means
It's quiet in here, amber means It's getting a bit busy and red means
This is rammed (or words to that effect). Something similar happens on
the new Thameslink trains, although on Thameslink the displays are
inside the carriages, not in the stations.
If you have to have either one or the other, having it on the platforms
is better than having it on the trains, as it means that you can board
at the right place instead of having to fight your way through a crowded
train to get to the right place.

Having it where the staircase splits to go to the platforms seems a bit
odd though, as it won't be seen by the people who would get the most
benefit from it - that is, people in wheelchairs or with baby buggies,
who will use the lifts.

Nevertheless - hurrah! And I assume that little problems like that will
be fixed when the system is rolled out more widely. This is presumably
just a trial to make sure that it's reliable.
--
David Cantrell | http://www.cantrell.org.uk/david

Blessed are the pessimists, for they test their backups
b***@cylonHQ.com
2017-10-19 12:52:49 UTC
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On Thu, 19 Oct 2017 13:20:11 +0100
Post by David Cantrell
Nevertheless - hurrah! And I assume that little problems like that will
be fixed when the system is rolled out more widely. This is presumably
just a trial to make sure that it's reliable.
Seems a bit odd to even need it on the ELL though given the trains are walk
through. When I used it people just tended to get in the nearest door and
spread out down it.
Offramp
2017-10-19 19:02:08 UTC
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Post by David Cantrell
Nevertheless - hurrah! And I assume that little problems like that will
be fixed when the system is rolled out more widely.
...But surely if, in the future, trains consist of one long walkthru carriage, then the whole system will be defunct.
Recliner
2017-10-19 19:25:56 UTC
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Post by Offramp
Post by David Cantrell
Nevertheless - hurrah! And I assume that little problems like that will
be fixed when the system is rolled out more widely.
...But surely if, in the future, trains consist of one long walkthru
carriage, then the whole system will be defunct.
The class 700s and 378s already have open gangways, and loading advice like
this remains useful, particularly before boarding.
Roland Perry
2017-10-20 09:37:19 UTC
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<1322526587.530133835.349983.recliner.ng-***@news.eternal-sept
ember.org>, at 19:25:56 on Thu, 19 Oct 2017, Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Offramp
Post by David Cantrell
Nevertheless - hurrah! And I assume that little problems like that will
be fixed when the system is rolled out more widely.
...But surely if, in the future, trains consist of one long walkthru
carriage, then the whole system will be defunct.
The class 700s and 378s already have open gangways, and loading advice like
this remains useful, particularly before boarding.
And if the trains are really crowded you can't walk through. I almost
never see people walking through anyway.
--
Roland Perry
Recliner
2017-10-20 17:15:12 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
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ember.org>, at 19:25:56 on Thu, 19 Oct 2017, Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Offramp
Post by David Cantrell
Nevertheless - hurrah! And I assume that little problems like that will
be fixed when the system is rolled out more widely.
...But surely if, in the future, trains consist of one long walkthru
carriage, then the whole system will be defunct.
The class 700s and 378s already have open gangways, and loading advice like
this remains useful, particularly before boarding.
And if the trains are really crowded you can't walk through. I almost
never see people walking through anyway.
People do walk a carriage or two, but rarely more. It would be ideal to be
able see the carriage loading on a platform display before the train
arrives.

Basil Jet
2017-10-19 19:33:21 UTC
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Post by Offramp
Post by David Cantrell
Nevertheless - hurrah! And I assume that little problems like that will
be fixed when the system is rolled out more widely.
...But surely if, in the future, trains consist of one long walkthru carriage, then the whole system will be defunct.
I think they've missed an opportunity. If the active suspension can move
the carriages up and down and also measure the weight, all they need to
do is tilt the busy carriages lengthways and shake them up and down
vigorously until the carriage weights are equal.
Robin
2017-10-19 21:02:22 UTC
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Post by David Cantrell
Nevertheless - hurrah! And I assume that little problems like that will
be fixed when the system is rolled out more widely.
....But surely if, in the future, trains consist of one long walkthru carriage, then the whole system will be defunct.
As a frequent user of the NLL I can only admire someone who is sanguine
about walking through carriages which are anywhere near full. Quite
apart from the legs across the aisle (sleepers, competitive man-splayers
et al) there are the buggies the size of a landau, bicycles (folded and
unfolded), spirit levels, suitcases sized for disposing of the obese
spouse,...
--
Robin
reply-to address is (intended to be) valid
Basil Jet
2017-10-20 00:12:06 UTC
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Post by eastender
This new pilot screen at Shoreditch High Street station shows you how
busy each of the carriages are before you board your train. Green means
It's quiet in here, amber means It's getting a bit busy and red means
This is rammed (or words to that effect). Something similar happens on
the new Thameslink trains, although on Thameslink the displays are
inside the carriages, not in the stations.
http://diamondgeezer.blogspot.co.uk/2017/10/orinoco-flow.html
Geoff Marshall's video is here.

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