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675 bus route
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Hammersmith And City Line
2017-09-18 07:25:49 UTC
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Why is there no pictures on google of this route? its a bit suspicious. and who runs it??
Offramp
2017-09-18 07:36:55 UTC
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Post by Hammersmith And City Line
Why is there no pictures on google of this route? its a bit suspicious. and who runs it??
With that number it must be a school bus. Those buses normally only run once a day in each direction, so the opportunity to photgraph them must be limited.
d***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-09-18 07:50:14 UTC
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On Mon, 18 Sep 2017 00:36:55 -0700 (PDT), Offramp
Post by Offramp
Post by Hammersmith And City Line
Why is there no pictures on google of this route? its a bit suspicious. and who runs it??
With that number it must be a school bus. Those buses normally only run once a day in each direction, so the opportunity to photgraph them must be limited.
Probably not too wise to photograph a bus load of schoolchildren
nowadays either.

G.Harman
Roland Perry
2017-09-18 08:14:38 UTC
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Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Offramp
Post by Hammersmith And City Line
Why is there no pictures on google of this route? its a bit suspicious. and who runs it??
With that number it must be a school bus. Those buses normally only run once a day in each direction, so the opportunity to photgraph them
must be limited.
Probably not too wise to photograph a bus load of schoolchildren
nowadays either.
Are they an expected terrorist target? In Israel perhaps, but not in the
UK.
--
Roland Perry
d***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-09-18 09:19:50 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Offramp
Post by Hammersmith And City Line
Why is there no pictures on google of this route? its a bit suspicious. and who runs it??
With that number it must be a school bus. Those buses normally only run once a day in each direction, so the opportunity to photgraph them
must be limited.
Probably not too wise to photograph a bus load of schoolchildren
nowadays either.
Are they an expected terrorist target? In Israel perhaps, but not in the
UK.
No, but the photographer may well be accused of being a Pedophile by a
busybody or a parent who may seem over concerned to others but really
believes anyone looking in the general direction of their children
mean them harm.
You may or may not have gathered from my posts over the years that I
was once involved in running a preserved ship, we had the devils own
job one day, with a Grandparent as it happened. She demanded the
Captain take action against another passenger "who was taking pictures
of my Grandson" what action we could have taken at point was debatable
though Granny was possibly hoping we had a brig into which to throw
the photographer. As it happened the photographer was a regular
passenger and after a quite word with him allowed the Captain to take
his camera and show this Harridan all the photos taken that voyage and
as expected the boy was nowhere to be seen . All the pictures were of
other vessels and landmarks , a couple may have been shot with the boy
below the field of view with the lens apparently in his direction but
even if had been taller he would not have been in focus.
If the photographer had not been willing to cooperate I'm sure the
Granny would have been calling the police on her mobile demanding they
were at the dock on arrival.

Since then I have taken reasonable care to make sure any photo I take
is not in the direction of children with a couple of exceptions around
a crowded object where I ask the parent if they have any objections
if their child appears in shot.

I suppose anyone who regularly goes out to take bus photos could wear
a Gilet with "Bus Photographer on it" . Trouble is many folk would
think that is weird in itself.

G.Harman
Someone Somewhere
2017-09-18 09:40:09 UTC
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Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
I
was once involved in running a preserved ship, we had the devils own
job one day, with a Grandparent as it happened. She demanded the
Captain take action against another passenger "who was taking pictures
of my Grandson"
Whereas of course a while back the Captain of a certain preserved ship
was the one she should actually have been concerned about in terms of
ann unhealthy interest in young boys... (allegedly, although I believe
he was coonvicted of the same eventually)
d***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-09-18 10:06:12 UTC
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On Mon, 18 Sep 2017 10:40:09 +0100, Someone Somewhere
Post by Someone Somewhere
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
I
was once involved in running a preserved ship, we had the devils own
job one day, with a Grandparent as it happened. She demanded the
Captain take action against another passenger "who was taking pictures
of my Grandson"
Whereas of course a while back the Captain of a certain preserved ship
was the one she should actually have been concerned about in terms of
ann unhealthy interest in young boys... (allegedly, although I believe
he was coonvicted of the same eventually)
Yes, I know who you mean as naturally in such a small circle of
operations you get to know and even meet each other.
Not the same ship and not the same Captain though he did do a stint
one time when were short. The subsequent revelations surprised a lot
of people and no allegedly about it , he was found Guilty.
Our regular one didn't have the habit of running aground .

G.Harman
Roland Perry
2017-09-18 09:58:45 UTC
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Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Roland Perry
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Offramp
Post by Hammersmith And City Line
Why is there no pictures on google of this route? its a bit suspicious. and who runs it??
With that number it must be a school bus. Those buses normally only run once a day in each direction, so the opportunity to photgraph them
must be limited.
Probably not too wise to photograph a bus load of schoolchildren
nowadays either.
Are they an expected terrorist target? In Israel perhaps, but not in the
UK.
No, but the photographer may well be accused of being a Pedophile by a
busybody or a parent who may seem over concerned to others but really
believes anyone looking in the general direction of their children
mean them harm.
If they understood the methods used by 'genuine' pedophiles, they
wouldn't be the slightest bit concerned.

But it is worrysome that people set themselves up as vigilantes[1], when
most times they have a very low skill set and end up harassing the
innocent.

ps in the case of your troublesome ship passenger, I'd probably have a
quiet word to them about desisting from harassing the photographer, if
they don't want to be explaining their actions to the police later.

[1] In the news today!
--
Roland Perry
d***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-09-18 10:44:59 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Roland Perry
Are they an expected terrorist target? In Israel perhaps, but not in the
UK.
No, but the photographer may well be accused of being a Pedophile by a
busybody
If they understood the methods used by 'genuine' pedophiles, they
wouldn't be the slightest bit concerned.
This was around the time when , I think it was the "News of the
World" had started some sort of campaign that caused some of the
unthinking to go over the top, with paediatricians being harassed by
people who could not spell or read long words.
Post by Roland Perry
But it is worrysome that people set themselves up as vigilantes[1], when
most times they have a very low skill set and end up harassing the
innocent.
ps in the case of your troublesome ship passenger, I'd probably have a
quiet word to them about desisting from harassing the photographer, if
they don't want to be explaining their actions to the police later.
The Captain was as a semi retired Master Mariner , After years of
being at deep sea I suppose he was used to not having Police a couple
of hours away and decided on the best course of action at the time to
defuse the situation and even the innocent can be inconvenienced once
the Bill have to ask questions, as I said the photographer was a
regular and we knew that he did not have long between disembarking and
catching a train, miss it and it would have been a night in a hotel
job and a loss of a workday .
Post by Roland Perry
[1] In the news today!
Yes was being discussed on the local,the radio as I typed .
I think it is the result of various BBC Inside Out programmes having
them as a subject this evening.

Going back to when the newspaper ran its campaign a certain notorious
housing estate on the edge of Portsmouth made the news for having some
set themselves up as Vigilantes, and very low skill set is being kind,
Knooow whaat I meeeen. At the time someone remarked when local
newsnet groups were still active they would rather have Pedophiles.


G.Harman
Roland Perry
2017-09-18 11:06:47 UTC
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Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
Yes was being discussed on the local,the radio as I typed .
I think it is the result of various BBC Inside Out programmes having
them as a subject this evening.
Sadly, trailers for later programmes is now what passes for "news" much
of the time on BBC Breakfast.
--
Roland Perry
District Line
2017-09-18 11:49:23 UTC
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Well there is one picture.
Loading Image...
tim...
2017-09-18 12:48:45 UTC
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Post by District Line
Well there is one picture.
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8051/8119457888_17d9fd0abf_b.jpg
OMG there are three young children in the picture

Pixilate them out immediately

tim
Recliner
2017-09-18 13:31:49 UTC
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Post by tim...
Post by District Line
Well there is one picture.
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8051/8119457888_17d9fd0abf_b.jpg
OMG there are three young children in the picture
Pixilate them out immediately
It's curious that there's only three: I thought kids were magnetically
attracted to the front and back seats of buses.
d***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-09-18 15:21:52 UTC
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On Mon, 18 Sep 2017 14:31:49 +0100, Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by tim...
Post by District Line
Well there is one picture.
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8051/ 8119457888_17d9fd0abf_b.jpg
OMG there are three young children in the picture
Pixilate them out immediately
It's curious that there's only three: I thought kids were magnetically
attracted to the front and back seats of buses.
Not as popular since smoking got banned and the lack of opening window
sections at the front means you can longer hurl sweets, spit, and Hurl
the swots trainers onto users of the pedestrian crossing the bus has
stopped at. Besides most are looking the screens of their phone
devices ,they would hardly notice if the bus had no windows to look
out of.

G.Harman
Offramp
2017-09-18 16:52:14 UTC
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Post by Recliner
It's curious that there's only three: I thought kids were magnetically
attracted to the front and back seats of buses.
In my experience kids HATE school buses, and wait for the next available standard bus. DRIVERS hate schoolkids and will do ANYTHING to be very early or very late for the route. My local bus is the 655. I holds about 100 but it is normally about half full.

I think I use the 655 more often than the school children.
Jarle Hammen Knudsen
2017-09-18 17:57:45 UTC
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On Mon, 18 Sep 2017 09:52:14 -0700 (PDT), Offramp
Post by Offramp
I think I use the 655 more often than the school children.
So non-school people can use school buses in London?
--
jhk
Recliner
2017-09-18 19:54:47 UTC
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On Mon, 18 Sep 2017 19:57:45 +0200, Jarle Hammen Knudsen
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Mon, 18 Sep 2017 09:52:14 -0700 (PDT), Offramp
Post by Offramp
I think I use the 655 more often than the school children.
So non-school people can use school buses in London?
From the picture, it's not actually a school bus as such, just an
ordinary double-decker bus deployed to a route aimed mainly at school
kids.
news{@bestley.co.uk (Mark Bestley)
2017-09-19 12:08:51 UTC
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Post by Recliner
On Mon, 18 Sep 2017 19:57:45 +0200, Jarle Hammen Knudsen
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Mon, 18 Sep 2017 09:52:14 -0700 (PDT), Offramp
Post by Offramp
I think I use the 655 more often than the school children.
So non-school people can use school buses in London?
From the picture, it's not actually a school bus as such, just an
ordinary double-decker bus deployed to a route aimed mainly at school
kids.
hich is what a school bus is in London (and I think UK) We don't have
the silly waste of separate school buses that the US have. Although that
does mean that some of ours are not very good buses.
--
Mark
b***@cylonHQ.com
2017-09-19 12:28:48 UTC
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On Tue, 19 Sep 2017 13:08:51 +0100
Post by news{@bestley.co.uk (Mark Bestley)
Post by Recliner
On Mon, 18 Sep 2017 19:57:45 +0200, Jarle Hammen Knudsen
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Mon, 18 Sep 2017 09:52:14 -0700 (PDT), Offramp
Post by Offramp
I think I use the 655 more often than the school children.
So non-school people can use school buses in London?
From the picture, it's not actually a school bus as such, just an
ordinary double-decker bus deployed to a route aimed mainly at school
kids.
hich is what a school bus is in London (and I think UK) We don't have
the silly waste of separate school buses that the US have. Although that
does mean that some of ours are not very good buses.
Those US school buses look like they were designed in the 1940s to me. Is
there some reason they can't use a modern bus but have to use some archaic
throwbacks?
Recliner
2017-09-19 12:45:07 UTC
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Post by b***@cylonHQ.com
On Tue, 19 Sep 2017 13:08:51 +0100
Post by news{@bestley.co.uk (Mark Bestley)
Post by Recliner
On Mon, 18 Sep 2017 19:57:45 +0200, Jarle Hammen Knudsen
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Mon, 18 Sep 2017 09:52:14 -0700 (PDT), Offramp
Post by Offramp
I think I use the 655 more often than the school children.
So non-school people can use school buses in London?
From the picture, it's not actually a school bus as such, just an
ordinary double-decker bus deployed to a route aimed mainly at school
kids.
hich is what a school bus is in London (and I think UK) We don't have
the silly waste of separate school buses that the US have. Although that
does mean that some of ours are not very good buses.
Those US school buses look like they were designed in the 1940s to me. Is
there some reason they can't use a modern bus but have to use some archaic
throwbacks?
They also have more modern ones, but I suppose the old ones last for a very
long time. They don't do a high mileage, after all.
Someone Somewhere
2017-09-19 12:50:36 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Post by b***@cylonHQ.com
On Tue, 19 Sep 2017 13:08:51 +0100
Post by news{@bestley.co.uk (Mark Bestley)
Post by Recliner
On Mon, 18 Sep 2017 19:57:45 +0200, Jarle Hammen Knudsen
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Mon, 18 Sep 2017 09:52:14 -0700 (PDT), Offramp
Post by Offramp
I think I use the 655 more often than the school children.
So non-school people can use school buses in London?
From the picture, it's not actually a school bus as such, just an
ordinary double-decker bus deployed to a route aimed mainly at school
kids.
hich is what a school bus is in London (and I think UK) We don't have
the silly waste of separate school buses that the US have. Although that
does mean that some of ours are not very good buses.
Those US school buses look like they were designed in the 1940s to me. Is
there some reason they can't use a modern bus but have to use some archaic
throwbacks?
They also have more modern ones, but I suppose the old ones last for a very
long time. They don't do a high mileage, after all.
Well they seem to keep replacing them with similar models - older ones
seem to end up as low-cost transport in central American countries such
as Guatemala.
d***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-09-19 13:29:52 UTC
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On Tue, 19 Sep 2017 13:50:36 +0100, Someone Somewhere
Post by Someone Somewhere
Post by Recliner
Post by b***@cylonHQ.com
Those US school buses look like they were designed in the 1940s to me. Is
there some reason they can't use a modern bus but have to use some archaic
throwbacks?
They also have more modern ones, but I suppose the old ones last for a very
long time. They don't do a high mileage, after all.
Well they seem to keep replacing them with similar models - older ones
seem to end up as low-cost transport in central American countries such
as Guatemala.
There is a retired Army officer who goes by the moniker of Colonel
Grumpy who has brought one back from Guatamala to Witshire and tuned
into a mobile Coffee shop selling South American Coffee,see it at a
couple of events around here such as the Chalke Valley History
Festival.

quick look at the www,
yep, They have webpage
http://www.cafeguate.co.uk/index.html

G.Harman
Nobody
2017-09-19 23:41:15 UTC
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On Tue, 19 Sep 2017 12:45:07 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by b***@cylonHQ.com
On Tue, 19 Sep 2017 13:08:51 +0100
Post by news{@bestley.co.uk (Mark Bestley)
Post by Recliner
On Mon, 18 Sep 2017 19:57:45 +0200, Jarle Hammen Knudsen
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Mon, 18 Sep 2017 09:52:14 -0700 (PDT), Offramp
Post by Offramp
I think I use the 655 more often than the school children.
So non-school people can use school buses in London?
From the picture, it's not actually a school bus as such, just an
ordinary double-decker bus deployed to a route aimed mainly at school
kids.
hich is what a school bus is in London (and I think UK) We don't have
the silly waste of separate school buses that the US have. Although that
does mean that some of ours are not very good buses.
Those US school buses look like they were designed in the 1940s to me. Is
there some reason they can't use a modern bus but have to use some archaic
throwbacks?
They also have more modern ones, but
still utilitarian.

I doubt any commuter in the Excited States or Canada would appreciate
having to board a 'school bus' to move from point A to point B.

The first problem is one-door entry/exit, which works fine as you pick
up/drop off the Dear Wee Kiddies and Stroppy Teens to/from their
school but falls flat for variable route coverage.

Second, I've yet to see a 'school bus' which is handicapped
accessible.

Third, their physical 'ride' is hellishly hard/rough; they're
basically trucks with closed-in bodies.

Having said that, a pile of discarded 'school buses' seem to migrate
to Latin America. Pay Bolivia a visit and look around while in La Paz
to observe what passes as public transport.
Roland Perry
2017-09-19 16:25:09 UTC
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Post by b***@cylonHQ.com
Those US school buses look like they were designed in the 1940s to me. Is
there some reason they can't use a modern bus but have to use some archaic
throwbacks?
They are robust and reliable. Why is anything more luxurious required?
--
Roland Perry
b***@cylonHQ.com
2017-09-20 08:38:41 UTC
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On Tue, 19 Sep 2017 17:25:09 +0100
Post by Roland Perry
Post by b***@cylonHQ.com
Those US school buses look like they were designed in the 1940s to me. Is
there some reason they can't use a modern bus but have to use some archaic
throwbacks?
They are robust and reliable. Why is anything more luxurious required?
So is a horse and cart. Also I'd be amazed if their crash worthiness and fuel
economy is as good as a normal bus.
Roland Perry
2017-09-20 09:28:31 UTC
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Post by b***@cylonHQ.com
Post by Roland Perry
Post by b***@cylonHQ.com
Those US school buses look like they were designed in the 1940s to me. Is
there some reason they can't use a modern bus but have to use some archaic
throwbacks?
They are robust and reliable. Why is anything more luxurious required?
So is a horse and cart. Also I'd be amazed if their crash worthiness and fuel
economy is as good as a normal bus.
No-one cares about fuel efficiency in the USA, nor do people crash into
school buses very often (they are large and conspicuous, getting too
close is frowned upon, let alone overtaking them, and they'd lock you up
and throw away the key. I doubt they ever get much above 30mph.
--
Roland Perry
Recliner
2017-09-20 08:58:18 UTC
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Post by b***@cylonHQ.com
On Tue, 19 Sep 2017 17:25:09 +0100
Post by Roland Perry
Post by b***@cylonHQ.com
Those US school buses look like they were designed in the 1940s to me. Is
there some reason they can't use a modern bus but have to use some archaic
throwbacks?
They are robust and reliable. Why is anything more luxurious required?
So is a horse and cart. Also I'd be amazed if their crash worthiness and fuel
economy is as good as a normal bus.
Are the kids required to wear seat belts on them? If not, the bus
crashworthiness hardly matters.
Richard
2017-09-20 19:05:18 UTC
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Post by b***@cylonHQ.com
On Tue, 19 Sep 2017 17:25:09 +0100
Post by Roland Perry
Post by b***@cylonHQ.com
Those US school buses look like they were designed in the 1940s to me. Is
there some reason they can't use a modern bus but have to use some archaic
throwbacks?
They are robust and reliable. Why is anything more luxurious required?
So is a horse and cart. Also I'd be amazed if their crash worthiness and fuel
economy is as good as a normal bus.
IMO a normal bus is better because of:

- Economy
- Accessibility (without a lot of fuss, both operationally and for the
passenger concerned)
- Reasonable comfort - don't laugh - as long as there is no 3-a-side
config
- Most importantly for the bus operator - gets kids used to using a
normal bus

Of course, for the last point to apply there has to *be* a normal bus,
but that's hardly a problem in London.

Richard.
Roland Perry
2017-09-20 20:24:11 UTC
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Post by Richard
Post by b***@cylonHQ.com
Post by Roland Perry
Post by b***@cylonHQ.com
Those US school buses look like they were designed in the 1940s to me. Is
there some reason they can't use a modern bus but have to use some archaic
throwbacks?
They are robust and reliable. Why is anything more luxurious required?
So is a horse and cart. Also I'd be amazed if their crash worthiness and fuel
economy is as good as a normal bus.
- Economy
- Accessibility (without a lot of fuss, both operationally and for the
passenger concerned)
- Reasonable comfort - don't laugh - as long as there is no 3-a-side
config
- Most importantly for the bus operator - gets kids used to using a
normal bus
"Normal" buses are only used as the very last resort in the USA, largely
by economic migrants on minimum wage. There's very little overlap with
students who ever took a school bus to High School.
Post by Richard
Of course, for the last point to apply there has to *be* a normal bus,
but that's hardly a problem in London.
It's a problem if we are discussing the majority of the USA.
--
Roland Perry
Richard
2017-09-20 21:14:06 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
Post by Richard
- Most importantly for the bus operator - gets kids used to using a
normal bus
"Normal" buses are only used as the very last resort in the USA, largely
by economic migrants on minimum wage. There's very little overlap with
students who ever took a school bus to High School.
Post by Richard
Of course, for the last point to apply there has to *be* a normal bus,
but that's hardly a problem in London.
It's a problem if we are discussing the majority of the USA.
Certainly is, but it's why I didn't want to see too many US school
buses here.

Richard.
Roland Perry
2017-09-20 21:30:40 UTC
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Post by Richard
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Richard
- Most importantly for the bus operator - gets kids used to using a
normal bus
"Normal" buses are only used as the very last resort in the USA, largely
by economic migrants on minimum wage. There's very little overlap with
students who ever took a school bus to High School.
Post by Richard
Of course, for the last point to apply there has to *be* a normal bus,
but that's hardly a problem in London.
It's a problem if we are discussing the majority of the USA.
Certainly is, but it's why I didn't want to see too many US school
buses here.
The rent-a-wreck school buses I see round here (and today was the first
time I noticed a singe decker variant) are not exactly a good advert for
stage buses.
--
Roland Perry
Jarle Hammen Knudsen
2017-09-19 19:38:59 UTC
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Post by b***@cylonHQ.com
Those US school buses look like they were designed in the 1940s to me. Is
there some reason they can't use a modern bus but have to use some archaic
throwbacks?
US school buses have a separate set of regulations.
--
jhk
d***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-09-19 13:16:25 UTC
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Post by news{@bestley.co.uk (Mark Bestley)
Post by Recliner
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
Post by Offramp
I think I use the 655 more often than the school children.
So non-school people can use school buses in London?
From the picture, it's not actually a school bus as such, just an
ordinary double-decker bus deployed to a route aimed mainly at school
kids.
hich is what a school bus is in London (and I think UK) We don't have
the silly waste of separate school buses that the US have. Although that
does mean that some of ours are not very good buses.
It has been tried in the UK to have dedicated school buses, First bus
set up a separate division to do it.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Student_UK

Dorset which I live close to was one place where they were tried.
Not sure of the latest sate of play, I suspect that operators who tend
to operate older vehicles that can be used on other services at
different times can do so at a lower cost and put in cheaper bids when
the contracts come up.

As for the general public using them in the UK I'm not sure they can
everywhere, the village I live had its once a week bus withdrawn last
year and I think a few people at the time enquired if the school bus
that goes to and from a large college was available found it was not,
a quick look at this timetable sees them described as college
exclusive.
But there some places elswehere where there are stage carraige
services laid on mainly for school attendance that may not run in
school holidays. The Devon village my mother lives in is one such,
the route uses the same number throughout the day but in term time an
early morning service does not run when the holidays are on so there
is only a mid morning and late afternoon service each day, and the
late afternoon is in bound only.

G.Harman
David Walters
2017-09-19 13:36:43 UTC
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Post by news{@bestley.co.uk (Mark Bestley)
Post by Recliner
On Mon, 18 Sep 2017 19:57:45 +0200, Jarle Hammen Knudsen
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Mon, 18 Sep 2017 09:52:14 -0700 (PDT), Offramp
Post by Offramp
I think I use the 655 more often than the school children.
So non-school people can use school buses in London?
From the picture, it's not actually a school bus as such, just an
ordinary double-decker bus deployed to a route aimed mainly at school
kids.
hich is what a school bus is in London (and I think UK)
Apart from where they aren't. There are several school bus services
around me (in North London) which use coaches.
Robin
2017-09-19 14:38:54 UTC
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Post by David Walters
Post by news{@bestley.co.uk (Mark Bestley)
Post by Recliner
On Mon, 18 Sep 2017 19:57:45 +0200, Jarle Hammen Knudsen
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Mon, 18 Sep 2017 09:52:14 -0700 (PDT), Offramp
Post by Offramp
I think I use the 655 more often than the school children.
So non-school people can use school buses in London?
From the picture, it's not actually a school bus as such, just an
ordinary double-decker bus deployed to a route aimed mainly at school
kids.
hich is what a school bus is in London (and I think UK)
Apart from where they aren't. There are several school bus services
around me (in North London) which use coaches.
I think that just serves to reinforce the point that "school bus" does
not have anything like as precise meaning (and iconic status) as it has
in the USA. And I find that very easy to understand given the way the
US school bus was so widespread - IIRC available for any child more than
a mile from school, even in cities.

And from my list of useless things I remember, John Prescott (when in
Government) sponsored a pilot in England of a US-style service - with
yellow buses imported from the USA.
--
Robin
reply-to address is (intended to be) valid
Roland Perry
2017-09-19 16:23:53 UTC
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Post by news{@bestley.co.uk (Mark Bestley)
Post by Recliner
From the picture, it's not actually a school bus as such, just an
ordinary double-decker bus deployed to a route aimed mainly at school
kids.
hich is what a school bus is in London (and I think UK) We don't have
the silly waste of separate school buses that the US have.
Having a dedicated fleet of USA school buses is the only way to provide
the transport, because stage buses are very scarce.

And don't make the mistake of thinking they do only one return trip a
day - where I lived in the USA for a year the school buses did three
morning trips and three afternoon ones, and the school hours were
staggered to account for that - different times for Elementary, Middle
and High Schools.

In somewhat similar conditions out in the English countryside, school
buses tend to be private hire rent-a-wrecks which either spend the rest
of the day ferrying crop-pickers around, or simply sit at the depot
(well, the back of some farmyard which passes for a depot).

In slightly more urban areas they might be pressed into service doing
once-a-day OAP trips to the out-of-town supermarkets.
--
Roland Perry
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-09-19 16:53:00 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
From the picture, it's not actually a school bus as such, just an
ordinary double-decker bus deployed to a route aimed mainly at school
kids.
which is what a school bus is in London (and I think UK) We don't have
the silly waste of separate school buses that the US have.
Having a dedicated fleet of USA school buses is the only way to
provide the transport, because stage buses are very scarce.
And don't make the mistake of thinking they do only one return trip a
day - where I lived in the USA for a year the school buses did three
morning trips and three afternoon ones, and the school hours were
staggered to account for that - different times for Elementary,
Middle and High Schools.
In somewhat similar conditions out in the English countryside, school
buses tend to be private hire rent-a-wrecks which either spend the
rest of the day ferrying crop-pickers around, or simply sit at the
depot (well, the back of some farmyard which passes for a depot).
In slightly more urban areas they might be pressed into service doing
once-a-day OAP trips to the out-of-town supermarkets.
Most of the subsidised routes in Cambridge only run during school hours so
the buses can be used to bring kids in to school in the morning and take
them home again in the afternoon. Examples are the 114, 117, 196.
--
Colin Rosenstiel
Roland Perry
2017-09-19 17:45:00 UTC
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Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
From the picture, it's not actually a school bus as such, just an
ordinary double-decker bus deployed to a route aimed mainly at school
kids.
which is what a school bus is in London (and I think UK) We don't have
the silly waste of separate school buses that the US have.
Having a dedicated fleet of USA school buses is the only way to
provide the transport, because stage buses are very scarce.
And don't make the mistake of thinking they do only one return trip a
day - where I lived in the USA for a year the school buses did three
morning trips and three afternoon ones, and the school hours were
staggered to account for that - different times for Elementary,
Middle and High Schools.
In somewhat similar conditions out in the English countryside, school
buses tend to be private hire rent-a-wrecks which either spend the
rest of the day ferrying crop-pickers around, or simply sit at the
depot (well, the back of some farmyard which passes for a depot).
In slightly more urban areas they might be pressed into service doing
once-a-day OAP trips to the out-of-town supermarkets.
Most of the subsidised routes in Cambridge only run during school hours so
the buses can be used to bring kids in to school in the morning and take
them home again in the afternoon. Examples are the 114, 117, 196.
That doesn't answer the question about whether the Big Green Bus
Company will take stage fares (rather than student seasons) on whatever
school runs they do before starting the 114 Cambridge to Addenbrookes
service[1] mid-morning.

[1] Is that really in need of subsidy?
--
Roland Perry
Neil Williams
2017-09-19 19:26:31 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
That doesn't answer the question about whether the Big Green Bus
Company will take stage fares (rather than student seasons) on whatever
school runs they do before starting the 114 Cambridge to Addenbrookes
service[1] mid-morning.
[1] Is that really in need of subsidy?
Have a look through Notices and Proceedings to see if it is registered.
If it is, as it indeed probably is, they legally have to, as otherwise
they are fraudulently claiming BSOG and should be reported.

Neil
--
Neil Williams
Put my first name before the @ to reply.
Offramp
2017-09-20 06:31:18 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
In somewhat similar conditions out in the English countryside, school
buses tend to be private hire rent-a-wrecks...
This made me think of Terry-Thomas's coach company in Blue Murder at St Trinian's.
Guy Gorton
2017-09-19 16:42:38 UTC
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Post by news{@bestley.co.uk (Mark Bestley)
Post by Recliner
On Mon, 18 Sep 2017 19:57:45 +0200, Jarle Hammen Knudsen
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Mon, 18 Sep 2017 09:52:14 -0700 (PDT), Offramp
Post by Offramp
I think I use the 655 more often than the school children.
So non-school people can use school buses in London?
From the picture, it's not actually a school bus as such, just an
ordinary double-decker bus deployed to a route aimed mainly at school
kids.
hich is what a school bus is in London (and I think UK) We don't have
the silly waste of separate school buses that the US have. Although that
does mean that some of ours are not very good buses.
Nobody seems to have mentioned the main reason for the yellow US
school bus - it has protected status on the road. It is illegal to
pass it when it stops, not just on your side of the road but on the
other side too. As far as I know, the rule does not apply to the
other carriage way of a divided highway (to use the US terminology).
I have driven many thousands of miles in the USA and have never seen
anyone defy that rule.. Its unfortunate spin off is that children
adopt an arrogant saunter across the road and do not learn respect for
traffic..

Guy Gorton
Roland Perry
2017-09-19 17:48:08 UTC
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Post by Guy Gorton
Post by news{@bestley.co.uk (Mark Bestley)
Post by Recliner
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
Post by Offramp
I think I use the 655 more often than the school children.
So non-school people can use school buses in London?
From the picture, it's not actually a school bus as such, just an
ordinary double-decker bus deployed to a route aimed mainly at school
kids.
hich is what a school bus is in London (and I think UK) We don't have
the silly waste of separate school buses that the US have. Although that
does mean that some of ours are not very good buses.
Nobody seems to have mentioned the main reason for the yellow US
school bus - it has protected status on the road. It is illegal to
pass it when it stops,
I think that's "pass it when it has its 'Stop' sign out". Some local
jurisdictions might have "pass one ever, at all".
Post by Guy Gorton
not just on your side of the road but on the
other side too. As far as I know, the rule does not apply to the
other carriage way of a divided highway (to use the US terminology).
I have driven many thousands of miles in the USA and have never seen
anyone defy that rule.. Its unfortunate spin off is that children
adopt an arrogant saunter across the road and do not learn respect for
traffic..
Some of them are driven like Fire Trucks too - "I believe I have
absolute priority, so get the f*ck out of my way". Especially when
exiting blind from school premises.
--
Roland Perry
Guy Gorton
2017-09-20 08:58:54 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
Post by Guy Gorton
Post by news{@bestley.co.uk (Mark Bestley)
Post by Recliner
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
Post by Offramp
I think I use the 655 more often than the school children.
So non-school people can use school buses in London?
From the picture, it's not actually a school bus as such, just an
ordinary double-decker bus deployed to a route aimed mainly at school
kids.
hich is what a school bus is in London (and I think UK) We don't have
the silly waste of separate school buses that the US have. Although that
does mean that some of ours are not very good buses.
Nobody seems to have mentioned the main reason for the yellow US
school bus - it has protected status on the road. It is illegal to
pass it when it stops,
I think that's "pass it when it has its 'Stop' sign out". Some local
jurisdictions might have "pass one ever, at all".
Yes. I forgot to include the huge flashing yellow lights front and
rear which are switched on as the bus slows for a stop and switched
off, hopefully, as it moves away again. That is usually the "don't
pass" sign.
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Guy Gorton
not just on your side of the road but on the
other side too. As far as I know, the rule does not apply to the
other carriage way of a divided highway (to use the US terminology).
I have driven many thousands of miles in the USA and have never seen
anyone defy that rule.. Its unfortunate spin off is that children
adopt an arrogant saunter across the road and do not learn respect for
traffic..
Some of them are driven like Fire Trucks too - "I believe I have
absolute priority, so get the f*ck out of my way". Especially when
exiting blind from school premises.
I noted that too.
Many of our school buses round here (south Bucks) are 6-wheel
doubledeckers, generally well driven but often gettting in the way!
And the children know the rules about crossing the road after the bus
has gone.

Guy Gorton
Roland Perry
2017-09-20 09:31:04 UTC
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Post by Guy Gorton
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Guy Gorton
Nobody seems to have mentioned the main reason for the yellow US
school bus - it has protected status on the road. It is illegal to
pass it when it stops,
I think that's "pass it when it has its 'Stop' sign out". Some local
jurisdictions might have "pass one ever, at all".
Yes. I forgot to include the huge flashing yellow lights front and
rear which are switched on as the bus slows for a stop and switched
off, hopefully, as it moves away again. That is usually the "don't
pass" sign.
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Guy Gorton
not just on your side of the road but on the
other side too. As far as I know, the rule does not apply to the
other carriage way of a divided highway (to use the US terminology).
I have driven many thousands of miles in the USA and have never seen
anyone defy that rule.. Its unfortunate spin off is that children
adopt an arrogant saunter across the road and do not learn respect for
traffic..
Some of them are driven like Fire Trucks too - "I believe I have
absolute priority, so get the f*ck out of my way". Especially when
exiting blind from school premises.
I noted that too.
Many of our school buses round here (south Bucks) are 6-wheel
doubledeckers, generally well driven but often gettting in the way!
And the children know the rules about crossing the road after the bus
has gone.
The USA scheme tends to involve the bus hanging around (with all the
traffic stopped) until the children have finished their crossing
manoeuvres. Try enforcing that in the UK!
--
Roland Perry
Guy Gorton
2017-09-20 16:38:28 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
Post by Guy Gorton
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Guy Gorton
Nobody seems to have mentioned the main reason for the yellow US
school bus - it has protected status on the road. It is illegal to
pass it when it stops,
I think that's "pass it when it has its 'Stop' sign out". Some local
jurisdictions might have "pass one ever, at all".
Yes. I forgot to include the huge flashing yellow lights front and
rear which are switched on as the bus slows for a stop and switched
off, hopefully, as it moves away again. That is usually the "don't
pass" sign.
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Guy Gorton
not just on your side of the road but on the
other side too. As far as I know, the rule does not apply to the
other carriage way of a divided highway (to use the US terminology).
I have driven many thousands of miles in the USA and have never seen
anyone defy that rule.. Its unfortunate spin off is that children
adopt an arrogant saunter across the road and do not learn respect for
traffic..
Some of them are driven like Fire Trucks too - "I believe I have
absolute priority, so get the f*ck out of my way". Especially when
exiting blind from school premises.
I noted that too.
Many of our school buses round here (south Bucks) are 6-wheel
doubledeckers, generally well driven but often gettting in the way!
And the children know the rules about crossing the road after the bus
has gone.
The USA scheme tends to involve the bus hanging around (with all the
traffic stopped) until the children have finished their crossing
manoeuvres. Try enforcing that in the UK!
And very bad training for children.

Guy Gorton
Nobody
2017-09-21 01:01:07 UTC
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On Wed, 20 Sep 2017 17:38:28 +0100, Guy Gorton
Post by Guy Gorton
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Guy Gorton
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Guy Gorton
Nobody seems to have mentioned the main reason for the yellow US
school bus - it has protected status on the road. It is illegal to
pass it when it stops,
I think that's "pass it when it has its 'Stop' sign out". Some local
jurisdictions might have "pass one ever, at all".
Yes. I forgot to include the huge flashing yellow lights front and
rear which are switched on as the bus slows for a stop and switched
off, hopefully, as it moves away again. That is usually the "don't
pass" sign.
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Guy Gorton
not just on your side of the road but on the
other side too. As far as I know, the rule does not apply to the
other carriage way of a divided highway (to use the US terminology).
I have driven many thousands of miles in the USA and have never seen
anyone defy that rule.. Its unfortunate spin off is that children
adopt an arrogant saunter across the road and do not learn respect for
traffic..
Some of them are driven like Fire Trucks too - "I believe I have
absolute priority, so get the f*ck out of my way". Especially when
exiting blind from school premises.
I noted that too.
Many of our school buses round here (south Bucks) are 6-wheel
doubledeckers, generally well driven but often gettting in the way!
And the children know the rules about crossing the road after the bus
has gone.
The USA scheme tends to involve the bus hanging around (with all the
traffic stopped) until the children have finished their crossing
manoeuvres. Try enforcing that in the UK!
And very bad training for children.
Guy Gorton
<Scratching head>

Pedestrians under law in British Columbia have the right-of-way at any
intersection: the rule of any intersection, controlled or not, creates
an unmarked crosswalk.
Guy Gorton
2017-09-21 07:55:54 UTC
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Post by Nobody
On Wed, 20 Sep 2017 17:38:28 +0100, Guy Gorton
Post by Guy Gorton
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Guy Gorton
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Guy Gorton
Nobody seems to have mentioned the main reason for the yellow US
school bus - it has protected status on the road. It is illegal to
pass it when it stops,
I think that's "pass it when it has its 'Stop' sign out". Some local
jurisdictions might have "pass one ever, at all".
Yes. I forgot to include the huge flashing yellow lights front and
rear which are switched on as the bus slows for a stop and switched
off, hopefully, as it moves away again. That is usually the "don't
pass" sign.
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Guy Gorton
not just on your side of the road but on the
other side too. As far as I know, the rule does not apply to the
other carriage way of a divided highway (to use the US terminology).
I have driven many thousands of miles in the USA and have never seen
anyone defy that rule.. Its unfortunate spin off is that children
adopt an arrogant saunter across the road and do not learn respect for
traffic..
Some of them are driven like Fire Trucks too - "I believe I have
absolute priority, so get the f*ck out of my way". Especially when
exiting blind from school premises.
I noted that too.
Many of our school buses round here (south Bucks) are 6-wheel
doubledeckers, generally well driven but often gettting in the way!
And the children know the rules about crossing the road after the bus
has gone.
The USA scheme tends to involve the bus hanging around (with all the
traffic stopped) until the children have finished their crossing
manoeuvres. Try enforcing that in the UK!
And very bad training for children.
Guy Gorton
<Scratching head>
Pedestrians under law in British Columbia have the right-of-way at any
intersection: the rule of any intersection, controlled or not, creates
an unmarked crosswalk.
That is true in the UK too although many motorists do not seem to
jjnow it. but we are tslking about children getting off the school
bus which is probably stopped in a plain stretch of road, not an
intersection.

Guy Gorton
Roland Perry
2017-09-19 06:31:59 UTC
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Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
Post by Offramp
I think I use the 655 more often than the school children.
So non-school people can use school buses in London?
If a bus has a "number" from the local fare stage operator, I don't see
why not.

On the other hand, outside London they are often privately run by other
companies, with specific termly season tickets.
--
Roland Perry
Neil Williams
2017-09-19 08:19:36 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
If a bus has a "number" from the local fare stage operator, I don't see
why not.
On the other hand, outside London they are often privately run by other
companies, with specific termly season tickets.
They are usually open to the public so BSOG can be claimed (typically a
cash fare is paid by a member of the public using one). Whether the
public would want to go within 100 miles of them is quite another
question.

Neil
--
Neil Williams
Put my first name before the @ to reply.
Roland Perry
2017-09-19 16:27:05 UTC
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Post by Neil Williams
Post by Roland Perry
If a bus has a "number" from the local fare stage operator, I don't
see why not.
On the other hand, outside London they are often privately run by
other companies, with specific termly season tickets.
They are usually open to the public so BSOG can be claimed (typically a
cash fare is paid by a member of the public using one). Whether the
public would want to go within 100 miles of them is quite another
question.
Do you mean the red London ones, or outside London.

Having looked at numerous of the latter earlier, they are all "pupils
with season tickets only".
--
Roland Perry
Neil Williams
2017-09-19 19:28:08 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
Do you mean the red London ones, or outside London.
Outside London is my main experience. All the MK ones are stage
carriage services which you can, if you wish, use yourself. Though I
don't think many people do, because they aren't really convenient, and
who wants to share their journey to work with a load of loud schoolkids
anyway?
Post by Roland Perry
Having looked at numerous of the latter earlier, they are all "pupils
with season tickets only".
Some are like that, but BSOG cannot be claimed, so they are more costly
to operate, having to pay fuel tax in full.

Neil
--
Neil Williams
Put my first name before the @ to reply.
Roland Perry
2017-09-19 20:54:05 UTC
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Post by Neil Williams
Post by Roland Perry
Having looked at numerous of the latter earlier, they are all "pupils
with season tickets only".
Some are like that, but BSOG cannot be claimed, so they are more costly
to operate, having to pay fuel tax in full.
I can believe they don't claim, given the high cost of many such student
seasons - which despite a guaranteed monthly income from a full load can
easily be in the region of a fiver per kid per day.
--
Roland Perry
Michael R N Dolbear
2017-09-20 02:23:14 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
Post by Neil Williams
They are usually open to the public so BSOG can be claimed (typically a
cash fare is paid by a member of the public using one). Whether the
public would want to go within 100 miles of them is quite another
question.
Do you mean the red London ones, or outside London.
Having looked at numerous of the latter earlier, they are all "pupils with
season tickets only".
Nope, Surrey do it both ways and of course accept ENCTS passes

https://www.surreycc.gov.uk/schools-and-learning/schools/school-transport/local-bus-services-which-serve-schools

The list does not include coach and taxi services provided by Surrey County
Council, as they are not available to the general public.
==

https://www.surreycc.gov.uk/roads-and-transport/buses-and-trains/bus-timetables/staines-chertsey-and-walton-bus-timetables#635

https://www.surreycc.gov.uk/roads-and-transport/buses-and-trains/bus-timetables/guildford-godalming-and-haslemere-bus-timetables#678
--
Mike D
Roland Perry
2017-09-20 07:36:06 UTC
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Post by Michael R N Dolbear
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Neil Williams
They are usually open to the public so BSOG can be claimed (typically
a cash fare is paid by a member of the public using one). Whether
the public would want to go within 100 miles of them is quite another
question.
Do you mean the red London ones, or outside London.
Having looked at numerous of the latter earlier, they are all "pupils
with season tickets only".
Nope, Surrey do it both ways and of course accept ENCTS passes
https://www.surreycc.gov.uk/schools-and-learning/schools/school-transpor
t/local-bus-services-which-serve-schools
That's the opposite of what we've been taking about - regular stage
buses which just happen to have schools on their route.
Post by Michael R N Dolbear
The list does not include coach and taxi services provided by Surrey
County Council, as they are not available to the general public.
And those are the ones we *are* talking about.
--
Roland Perry
Graham Harrison
2017-09-19 16:31:22 UTC
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On Mon, 18 Sep 2017 19:57:45 +0200, Jarle Hammen Knudsen
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Mon, 18 Sep 2017 09:52:14 -0700 (PDT), Offramp
Post by Offramp
I think I use the 655 more often than the school children.
So non-school people can use school buses in London?
When we lived in Berkshire my sons went to school on a private
charter. Here in Somerset I think all the local secondary schools
run school buses which are usually (but not exclusively) hand me down
coaches provided by local coach companies and most don't appear in
public timetables. There is one route from a sixth form college
which does appear in the timetable and I phoned the operator once to
ask if it was open to use by non-pupils (by the time I wanted to get
on it would have dropped at least part of the load) and the person I
talked to didn't really know but guessed (!) I'd be OK. In the end I
used a different mode so I never found out!

The simple, but probably unsatisfactory, answer is "it varies". There
is no hard and fast rule.
Paul Corfield
2017-09-19 09:20:10 UTC
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Post by Hammersmith And City Line
Why is there no pictures on google of this route? its a bit suspicious. and who runs it??
Not again. You must be the same person who commented on my Flickr account about this route. I have at least 2 photos of the route in service when it was run by CT Plus. There is nothing suspicious about the route. The route is now run by London General and uses the same bus and driver each day - I've seen it several times and even used it once as it came along to a stop first.

There are no issues with photographing school services in London. I have many photos of school buses taken without any great issue other than a cheeky remark from a school kid in Kingsbury and he was wrong in what he said.

Now perhaps you can stop the paranoia and ridiculous queries about the 675 bus?

Paul C
--
via Google
Offramp
2017-09-19 09:23:08 UTC
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Post by Hammersmith And City Line
Why is there no pictures on google of this route? its a bit suspicious. and who runs it??
Not again. ....
What was the story?? Fill us in! FILL US IN!!
Paul Corfield
2017-09-20 16:30:23 UTC
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Post by Offramp
Post by Hammersmith And City Line
Why is there no pictures on google of this route? its a bit suspicious. and who runs it??
Not again. ....
What was the story?? Fill us in! FILL US IN!!
No great story. Just someone commented under a photo I'd taken of a 675 and asking how I'd managed to take the photo. You'd think from the comments that I'd committed an act of espionage or I was an alien. It's just a bloomin' school bus that runs to a published timetable on public roads. There is nothing odd about it. The commenter never explained why they were expressing such a bizarre opinion but it's clearly cropped up here again but this time, despite there being public photos, making statements no such photos exist. The world is full of daft people.
--
Paul C
via Google
District Line
2017-09-22 12:03:00 UTC
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I thought I was excited about the 675 bus and I asked my friend the hamersmith and city line to ask on google forms whilst he was at the depot 51 posts later
we are talking about if pedestrians have the right of way.
District Line
2017-09-22 12:05:11 UTC
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Post by Hammersmith And City Line
Why is there no pictures on google of this route? its a bit suspicious. and who runs it??
Me and hamersmiths have a school bus for our train training academy however its a 6 minute walk away from our school???

but if you go to the more rich area where those bullet trains study there is a bus stop right in front of their schools NOT fair
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