Discussion:
Woking to Heathrow
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e27002 aurora
2017-04-01 08:47:12 UTC
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OK, so I have had it with the Woking RailAir coach link. I need an
alternative means of reaching the airport. Train from the South Coast
to Woking is fine. But what are the alternatives for reaching the
airport?

Has anyone used Uber? How does it work? What is the service like?
Anna Noyd-Dryver
2017-04-01 09:14:03 UTC
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Post by e27002 aurora
OK, so I have had it with the Woking RailAir coach link. I need an
alternative means of reaching the airport. Train from the South Coast
to Woking is fine. But what are the alternatives for reaching the
airport?
Where is your journey starting from?


Anna Noyd-Dryver
e27002 aurora
2017-04-01 10:07:16 UTC
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On Sat, 1 Apr 2017 09:14:03 -0000 (UTC), Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by e27002 aurora
OK, so I have had it with the Woking RailAir coach link. I need an
alternative means of reaching the airport. Train from the South Coast
to Woking is fine. But what are the alternatives for reaching the
airport?
Where is your journey starting from?
Starting from the Portsmouth area.
Roland Perry
2017-04-01 10:08:45 UTC
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Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by e27002 aurora
OK, so I have had it with the Woking RailAir coach link. I need an
alternative means of reaching the airport. Train from the South Coast
to Woking is fine. But what are the alternatives for reaching the
airport?
Where is your journey starting from?
And don't tell us - just stick it (and LHR) in Google maps and punch the
"train" icon.

Although if the Reading Railair link is out too, it may well be "via
Central London" is the only answer [including some via Reading,
Paddington and back].
--
Roland Perry
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-04-01 13:55:46 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by e27002 aurora
OK, so I have had it with the Woking RailAir coach link. I need an
alternative means of reaching the airport. Train from the South Coast
to Woking is fine. But what are the alternatives for reaching the
airport?
Where is your journey starting from?
And don't tell us - just stick it (and LHR) in Google maps and punch
the "train" icon.
Although if the Reading Railair link is out too, it may well be "via
Central London" is the only answer [including some via Reading,
Paddington and back].
Via Hounslow West used to be an option. Isn't it any more?
--
Colin Rosenstiel
D A Stocks
2017-04-01 11:15:44 UTC
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Post by e27002 aurora
Has anyone used Uber? How does it work? What is the service like?
It depends a lot on whether the service even exists in your area (I know
people who use it from Heathrow) and how many active drivers there are at
the time you want to travel.

I set up my Uber account when I was in New Jersey on business for a couple
of weeks during the summer of 2015. It worked well there. You need the Uber
app on your mobile with a registration that is easy to set up.

After that the rules vary slightly by location, but the basics are:
1. use the the app to book a ride
2. your car turns up and you get in. The app gives you the driver's name and
'phone number, and the registration/description of the car. The driver will
call you if they can't find you or there is a delay.
3. when you reach your destination you get out.

That's it: no fiddling with cash or hand-written receipts (I lost a wallet
this way in a taxi recently) - it's all done by payment card and email. For
Brighton and Sussex there is a guide here:
https://www.uber.com/en-GB/cities/brighton-and-sussex/

Uber first became available in Brighton and Hove about a year ago but when I
tried it soon after the launch there were never any drivers available, so I
have always used one of the local taxi firms booking by phone from home or
by taking a taxi off the rank from a local station. However, when I arrived
at Brighton Station last Thursday evening the length of queue at the rank
suggested it would be at least 10-15 minutes before I would get a ride (for
a 5 minute journey); this is because the daft queuing system only allows 1
or 2 taxis to load at a time, leading to long queues of both passengers and
taxis at busy times.

I fired up the Uber app and there were cars available within a couple of
minutes from a pick-up point just outside the station so I went for it. The
driver told me there are now around 90 drivers operating in the area, and
the fare was quite a bit less than a metered taxi. I may well take another
look at Uber when I make the reverse journey at 5.00 am on Monday morning:
no more messing about with cash and and, if my initial experience is
anything to go by, nicer cars, nicer drivers and cheaper. What's not to
like?

--
DAS
Roland Perry
2017-04-01 13:01:44 UTC
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I may well take another look at Uber when I make the reverse journey at
5.00 am on Monday morning: no more messing about with cash and and, if
my initial experience is anything to go by, nicer cars, nicer drivers
and cheaper. What's not to like?
The alleged exploitation of their workers, the implications for
proportionate corporation tax receipts flowing to the UK, and the
possibility that having captured the market they can hike their fares.

History also shows that startups such as this are exceptional if they
succeed in the medium-long term, so what's your exit strategy if they
pull out of the Brighton market?

This is just a generic observation of the venture capital funded world,
not a prediction about any particular company trading today.

The BBC opines: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-29653830
--
Roland Perry
tim...
2017-04-01 13:36:46 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
I may well take another look at Uber when I make the reverse journey at
5.00 am on Monday morning: no more messing about with cash and and, if my
initial experience is anything to go by, nicer cars, nicer drivers and
cheaper. What's not to like?
The alleged exploitation of their workers, the implications for
proportionate corporation tax receipts flowing to the UK, and the
possibility that having captured the market they can hike their fares.
the one thing about the taxi trade is that they can't monopolies the market
through lower fares and then hike them when the competition pulls out

the barriers to entry for a taxi company are so low that if you take your
fares back up to the regulated maximum the competition will soon pile back
in again.

to keep the competition out you have to keep your fares low forever

which is fine if your costs of operation really are low enough to support
that, but does mean that operating an unsustainably low fare to grab market
share doesn't work.
Post by Roland Perry
History also shows that startups such as this are exceptional if they
succeed in the medium-long term, so what's your exit strategy if they pull
out of the Brighton market?
catch the bus

He's a user not an investor

And they aren't selling a unique product
Post by Roland Perry
This is just a generic observation of the venture capital funded world,
not a prediction about any particular company trading today.
The BBC opines: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-29653830
Careful, Recliner will be along soon to tell you you are an idiot

tim
Roland Perry
2017-04-01 13:58:05 UTC
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Post by tim...
the one thing about the taxi trade is that they can't monopolies the
market through lower fares and then hike them when the competition
pulls out
the barriers to entry for a taxi company are so low that if you take
your fares back up to the regulated maximum the competition will soon
pile back in again.
to keep the competition out you have to keep your fares low forever
which is fine if your costs of operation really are low enough to
support that, but does mean that operating an unsustainably low fare to
grab market share doesn't work.
Except Uber is trying that. So your theory crashes in flames.
--
Roland Perry
tim...
2017-04-01 14:50:48 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
Post by tim...
the one thing about the taxi trade is that they can't monopolies the
market through lower fares and then hike them when the competition pulls
out
the barriers to entry for a taxi company are so low that if you take your
fares back up to the regulated maximum the competition will soon pile back
in again.
to keep the competition out you have to keep your fares low forever
which is fine if your costs of operation really are low enough to support
that, but does mean that operating an unsustainably low fare to grab
market share doesn't work.
Except Uber is trying that.
I know
Post by Roland Perry
So your theory crashes in flames.
but as it hasn't got to the "lets put the fares up again" bit, how does,
where we are now prove that it will work?

There is a theory that its real MO is,

1) force out the competition

2) replace cars with self driving cars and put the fares up

But I don't believe that model will work either as:

a) I believe the date that driverless cars will be routinely available is 10
years beyond what the optimists think the date will be. (We have discussed
this before and you were in the same place as me), Uber can't survive that
long subsidising fares.

b) It will change the Uber business model from one of the owner-driver
financing the cars to Uber financing the cars, and I don't believe that the
financial markets will give Uber (FTAOD any one company, whoever they are)
the money to finance 100% of the world's taxi-cabs[1]. So there will still
be room for other companies to finance self-driving cabs and come into the
market and compete on a country by country basis. Uber does not own any of
the necessary IPR in self driving. There's nothing here that cannot be
replicated by someone else.

tim

[1] a finger in the air figure of about 250 trillion pounds, 400 times
Uber's current valuation
Recliner
2017-04-01 15:29:22 UTC
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Post by tim...
Post by Roland Perry
I may well take another look at Uber when I make the reverse journey at
5.00 am on Monday morning: no more messing about with cash and and, if my
initial experience is anything to go by, nicer cars, nicer drivers and
cheaper. What's not to like?
The alleged exploitation of their workers, the implications for
proportionate corporation tax receipts flowing to the UK, and the
possibility that having captured the market they can hike their fares.
the one thing about the taxi trade is that they can't monopolies the market
through lower fares and then hike them when the competition pulls out
the barriers to entry for a taxi company are so low that if you take your
fares back up to the regulated maximum the competition will soon pile back
in again.
to keep the competition out you have to keep your fares low forever
which is fine if your costs of operation really are low enough to support
that, but does mean that operating an unsustainably low fare to grab market
share doesn't work.
Post by Roland Perry
History also shows that startups such as this are exceptional if they
succeed in the medium-long term, so what's your exit strategy if they pull
out of the Brighton market?
catch the bus
He's a user not an investor
And they aren't selling a unique product
Post by Roland Perry
This is just a generic observation of the venture capital funded world,
not a prediction about any particular company trading today.
The BBC opines: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-29653830
Careful, Recliner will be along soon to tell you you are an idiot
Huh? Why would I do that? I invest in many venture capital funds, and am
well aware that many startups fail. I've also long thought that many IT
companies are over-valued.
Arthur Conan Doyle
2017-04-01 13:12:09 UTC
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Post by D A Stocks
if my initial experience is
anything to go by, nicer cars, nicer drivers and cheaper. What's not to
like?
I used Uber Lux for a ride across London recently. Very nice. Wondered if the
driver was doing a little moonlighting with his employer's vehicle, but that's
his business.
Roland Perry
2017-04-01 13:58:40 UTC
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Post by Arthur Conan Doyle
Post by D A Stocks
if my initial experience is
anything to go by, nicer cars, nicer drivers and cheaper. What's not to
like?
I used Uber Lux for a ride across London recently. Very nice. Wondered if the
driver was doing a little moonlighting with his employer's vehicle, but that's
his business.
Might be yours if it turns out it wasn't insured for moonlighting, and
you get injured.
--
Roland Perry
D A Stocks
2017-04-01 16:14:08 UTC
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Post by Arthur Conan Doyle
Post by D A Stocks
if my initial experience is
anything to go by, nicer cars, nicer drivers and cheaper. What's not to
like?
I used Uber Lux for a ride across London recently. Very nice. Wondered if the
driver was doing a little moonlighting with his employer's vehicle, but that's
his business.
I'm not sure if the rules for Uber Lux are different, but my understanding
is that Uber drivers use their own vehicles.
--
DAS

tim...
2017-04-01 12:48:21 UTC
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Post by e27002 aurora
OK, so I have had it with the Woking RailAir coach link.
still not got any better :-)
Post by e27002 aurora
I need an
alternative means of reaching the airport. Train from the South Coast
to Woking is fine. But what are the alternatives for reaching the
airport?
It used to be possible to use the bus from Walton

every 30 minutes up until 11pm

but it's now only hourly and the last one's at 7pm (Useless!)



tim
Theo
2017-04-01 13:38:22 UTC
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Post by e27002 aurora
OK, so I have had it with the Woking RailAir coach link. I need an
alternative means of reaching the airport. Train from the South Coast
to Woking is fine. But what are the alternatives for reaching the
airport?
What's the problem with the RailAir coach?
Is it M25-related?

Woking-Clapham Junction
Clapham Junction-Feltham
285 bus to LHR

is the most obvious alternative, though somewhat slow.

Guildford-Worcester Park
X26 bus to LHR

is one I haven't tried.
Post by e27002 aurora
Has anyone used Uber? How does it work? What is the service like?
I suspect if the M25 is borked then Woking to Heathrow is going to be
difficult whatever. Staying on the train and getting off a Surbiton (if it
stops) then taking a taxi might be one way to avoid it.

Theo
Basil Jet
2017-04-01 13:45:43 UTC
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Post by Theo
Post by e27002 aurora
OK, so I have had it with the Woking RailAir coach link. I need an
alternative means of reaching the airport. Train from the South Coast
to Woking is fine. But what are the alternatives for reaching the
airport?
What's the problem with the RailAir coach?
Is it M25-related?
Woking-Clapham Junction
Clapham Junction-Feltham
285 bus to LHR
is the most obvious alternative, though somewhat slow.
Guildford-Worcester Park
X26 bus to LHR
is one I haven't tried.
Weybridge has direct trains to Feltham.
tim...
2017-04-01 13:53:06 UTC
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Post by Theo
Post by e27002 aurora
OK, so I have had it with the Woking RailAir coach link. I need an
alternative means of reaching the airport. Train from the South Coast
to Woking is fine. But what are the alternatives for reaching the
airport?
What's the problem with the RailAir coach?
It gets delayed

It gets cancelled at the last minute (sometimes, but not always, due to the
above)

To catch up from a delay it sometimes dumps you at T4 (now T5) and doesn't
run to T123, leaving you to make your own way on HEx. This is OKish to the
airport but CFU for people travelling from the airport (as by the time they
find out that they need to take the train to T5 to pick up the bus it is too
late)

Oh and unless it has improved the people at the terminal don't have a
****ing clue where the bus is and how late it might be. WFT is it still
1980?

And OMG It only runs hourly now!!!! when did that happen?
Post by Theo
Is it M25-related?
sometimes

tim
Roland Perry
2017-04-01 13:59:47 UTC
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Post by Theo
Staying on the train and getting off a Surbiton (if it
stops) then taking a taxi might be one way to avoid it.
Having lived in Surbiton at one time, getting from there to Heathrow by
road is a nightmare.
--
Roland Perry
Basil Jet
2017-04-01 15:35:29 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
Post by Theo
Staying on the train and getting off a Surbiton (if it
stops) then taking a taxi might be one way to avoid it.
Having lived in Surbiton at one time, getting from there to Heathrow by
road is a nightmare.
When I lived in Sutton I used the X26 (or I think it was called 726
then) to get to Heathrow. It wasn't a nightmare, so I think you're
massively exagerating.
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