Discussion:
The stuff of Boris J's nightmares?
(too old to reply)
Water musician
2017-01-25 16:06:00 UTC
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Dear all

I know it’s a few weeks out of date, but thought that all “bendy”
lovers would like to see this:

Scania’s new bi-artic – yes, with two trailer sections. And it’s gas
powered.

https://www.scania.com/group/en/scania-unveils-first-bi-articulated-euro-6-
gas-bus/


Sadly, only in LatAm so far – but we can always dream, while BJ can have
another nightmare!

TAFN

Ken
s***@potato.field
2017-01-25 16:38:27 UTC
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On Wed, 25 Jan 2017 17:06:00 +0100
Post by Water musician
Dear all
I know it’s a few weeks out of date, but thought that all “bendy”
Scania’s new bi-artic – yes, with two trailer sections. And it’s gas
powered.
https://www.scania.com/group/en/scania-unveils-first-bi-articulated-euro-6-
gas-bus/
Sadly, only in LatAm so far – but we can always dream, while BJ can have
another nightmare!
I suspect buses are the last thing on bojos mind these days. You have to wonder
how cyclists in europe cope with these mass murdering buses!
--
Spud
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-01-25 17:47:43 UTC
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Post by s***@potato.field
On Wed, 25 Jan 2017 17:06:00 +0100
Post by Water musician
Dear all
I know it's a few weeks out of date, but thought that all "bendy"
Scania's new bi-artic – yes, with two trailer sections. And it's gas
powered.
https://www.scania.com/group/en/scania-unveils-first-bi-articulated-euro-6-g
as-bus/
Post by s***@potato.field
Post by Water musician
Sadly, only in LatAm so far - but we can always dream, while BJ can have
another nightmare!
I suspect buses are the last thing on bojos mind these days. You have to
wonder how cyclists in europe cope with these mass murdering buses!
Double articulated trolleybuses have been in use in Switzerland for some
time. Dunno what sort of streets they use them on.
--
Colin Rosenstiel
Roland Perry
2017-01-25 19:01:44 UTC
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Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Double articulated trolleybuses have been in use in Switzerland for some
time. Dunno what sort of streets they use them on.
Ones with not huge amounts of other traffic, quite a lot of mopeds
buzzing around, and very few cyclists.
--
Roland Perry
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-01-26 00:24:17 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Double articulated trolleybuses have been in use in Switzerland for some
time. Dunno what sort of streets they use them on.
Ones with not huge amounts of other traffic, quite a lot of mopeds
buzzing around, and very few cyclists.
Everywhere? Some Swiss cities have lots of cyclists.
--
Colin Rosenstiel
Roland Perry
2017-01-26 08:51:04 UTC
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Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Roland Perry
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Double articulated trolleybuses have been in use in Switzerland for some
time. Dunno what sort of streets they use them on.
Ones with not huge amounts of other traffic, quite a lot of mopeds
buzzing around, and very few cyclists.
Everywhere? Some Swiss cities have lots of cyclists.
To be honest, I've only seen a couple of Swiss cities that have such
trolleybuses, but they are hilly, and thus not much fun to cycle in.
--
Roland Perry
Recliner
2017-01-26 09:08:01 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Roland Perry
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Double articulated trolleybuses have been in use in Switzerland for some
time. Dunno what sort of streets they use them on.
Ones with not huge amounts of other traffic, quite a lot of mopeds
buzzing around, and very few cyclists.
Everywhere? Some Swiss cities have lots of cyclists.
To be honest, I've only seen a couple of Swiss cities that have such
trolleybuses, but they are hilly, and thus not much fun to cycle in.
I don't think that lakeside Lucerne is particularly hilly?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/sets/72157655400441705
Roland Perry
2017-01-26 09:30:32 UTC
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In message
<982695317.507114532.580857.recliner.ng-***@news.eternal-septe
mber.org>, at 09:08:01 on Thu, 26 Jan 2017, Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Roland Perry
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Double articulated trolleybuses have been in use in Switzerland for some
time. Dunno what sort of streets they use them on.
Ones with not huge amounts of other traffic, quite a lot of mopeds
buzzing around, and very few cyclists.
Everywhere? Some Swiss cities have lots of cyclists.
To be honest, I've only seen a couple of Swiss cities that have such
trolleybuses, but they are hilly, and thus not much fun to cycle in.
I don't think that lakeside Lucerne is particularly hilly?
https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/sets/72157655400441705
Never been there but Geneva and Lausanne are both hilly (the latter
having a specialty railway from the shore to the town centre).
--
Roland Perry
s***@potato.field
2017-01-26 09:55:53 UTC
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On Thu, 26 Jan 2017 09:30:32 +0000
Post by Roland Perry
In message
mber.org>, at 09:08:01 on Thu, 26 Jan 2017, Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Roland Perry
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Double articulated trolleybuses have been in use in Switzerland for some
time. Dunno what sort of streets they use them on.
Ones with not huge amounts of other traffic, quite a lot of mopeds
buzzing around, and very few cyclists.
Everywhere? Some Swiss cities have lots of cyclists.
To be honest, I've only seen a couple of Swiss cities that have such
trolleybuses, but they are hilly, and thus not much fun to cycle in.
I don't think that lakeside Lucerne is particularly hilly?
https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/sets/72157655400441705
Never been there but Geneva and Lausanne are both hilly (the latter
having a specialty railway from the shore to the town centre).
Either way, the cyclists in europe seem to cope with bendy buses without a
problem. Its only the cyclists in this country who were determined to see them
banned despite them being a godsend for the disabled and parents with buggies.
Tells you all you need to know about a lot of the self righteous snowflakes on
bikes we have here.
--
Spud
Richard
2017-01-26 20:25:25 UTC
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Post by s***@potato.field
On Thu, 26 Jan 2017 09:30:32 +0000
Post by Roland Perry
In message
mber.org>, at 09:08:01 on Thu, 26 Jan 2017, Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Roland Perry
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Double articulated trolleybuses have been in use in Switzerland for some
time. Dunno what sort of streets they use them on.
Ones with not huge amounts of other traffic, quite a lot of mopeds
buzzing around, and very few cyclists.
Everywhere? Some Swiss cities have lots of cyclists.
To be honest, I've only seen a couple of Swiss cities that have such
trolleybuses, but they are hilly, and thus not much fun to cycle in.
I don't think that lakeside Lucerne is particularly hilly?
https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/sets/72157655400441705
Never been there but Geneva and Lausanne are both hilly (the latter
having a specialty railway from the shore to the town centre).
Either way, the cyclists in europe seem to cope with bendy buses without a
problem. Its only the cyclists in this country who were determined to see them
banned despite them being a godsend for the disabled and parents with buggies.
Tells you all you need to know about a lot of the self righteous snowflakes on
bikes we have here.
It always seemed to me that the major risk to bikes was from HGVs, and
the bus thing was the imagination of a mayoral candidate who's grasp
of even what his own opinions were was less than firm and would do
anything for election (to be repeated later).

We've seen, successfully IMHO, how separating cycle traffic from the
rest can work well, as long as it improves walking routes as well.
This has a bigger positive effect than a minor (thoughtless,
vindictive) change to bus allocation while other drivers carry on as
before.

Double-artics are now in Barcelona as well, an ideal city for a bus
that likes straight roads. They have been removed from... Hamburg,
was it? Switzerland seems to be the best place to see them now.

Richard.
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-01-27 00:34:32 UTC
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Post by Richard
Post by s***@potato.field
On Thu, 26 Jan 2017 09:30:32 +0000
Post by Roland Perry
In message
september.org>, at 09:08:01 on Thu, 26 Jan 2017, Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Roland Perry
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Double articulated trolleybuses have been in use in Switzerland
for some time. Dunno what sort of streets they use them on.
Ones with not huge amounts of other traffic, quite a lot of mopeds
buzzing around, and very few cyclists.
Everywhere? Some Swiss cities have lots of cyclists.
To be honest, I've only seen a couple of Swiss cities that have such
trolleybuses, but they are hilly, and thus not much fun to cycle in.
I don't think that lakeside Lucerne is particularly hilly?
https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/sets/72157655400441705
Never been there but Geneva and Lausanne are both hilly (the latter
having a specialty railway from the shore to the town centre).
Either way, the cyclists in europe seem to cope with bendy buses without
a problem. Its only the cyclists in this country who were determined to
see them banned despite them being a godsend for the disabled and parents
with buggies. Tells you all you need to know about a lot of the self
righteous snowflakes on bikes we have here.
It always seemed to me that the major risk to bikes was from HGVs, and
the bus thing was the imagination of a mayoral candidate who's grasp
of even what his own opinions were was less than firm and would do
anything for election (to be repeated later).
You never cycled amongst them as I did then. Their length made them a
nightmare to cycle around.
Post by Richard
We've seen, successfully IMHO, how separating cycle traffic from the
rest can work well, as long as it improves walking routes as well.
This has a bigger positive effect than a minor (thoughtless,
vindictive) change to bus allocation while other drivers carry on as
before.
Yup. I cycled between Blackfriars Bridge and Westminster Bridge both ways
along the Embankment cycleway today. Wish we had such good facilities in
Cambridge.
Post by Richard
Double-artics are now in Barcelona as well, an ideal city for a bus
that likes straight roads. They have been removed from... Hamburg,
was it? Switzerland seems to be the best place to see them now.
--
Colin Rosenstiel
s***@potato.field
2017-01-27 09:55:58 UTC
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On Thu, 26 Jan 2017 18:34:32 -0600
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Richard
Post by s***@potato.field
On Thu, 26 Jan 2017 09:30:32 +0000
Post by Roland Perry
In message
september.org>, at 09:08:01 on Thu, 26 Jan 2017, Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Roland Perry
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Double articulated trolleybuses have been in use in Switzerland
for some time. Dunno what sort of streets they use them on.
Ones with not huge amounts of other traffic, quite a lot of mopeds
buzzing around, and very few cyclists.
Everywhere? Some Swiss cities have lots of cyclists.
To be honest, I've only seen a couple of Swiss cities that have such
trolleybuses, but they are hilly, and thus not much fun to cycle in.
I don't think that lakeside Lucerne is particularly hilly?
https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/sets/72157655400441705
Never been there but Geneva and Lausanne are both hilly (the latter
having a specialty railway from the shore to the town centre).
Either way, the cyclists in europe seem to cope with bendy buses without
a problem. Its only the cyclists in this country who were determined to
see them banned despite them being a godsend for the disabled and parents
with buggies. Tells you all you need to know about a lot of the self
righteous snowflakes on bikes we have here.
It always seemed to me that the major risk to bikes was from HGVs, and
the bus thing was the imagination of a mayoral candidate who's grasp
of even what his own opinions were was less than firm and would do
anything for election (to be repeated later).
You never cycled amongst them as I did then. Their length made them a
nightmare to cycle around.
So how do you cope with HGVs? If you feel unsafe cycling around a large
vehicle - then don't. Simple.
--
Spud
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-01-27 11:47:39 UTC
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Post by s***@potato.field
On Thu, 26 Jan 2017 18:34:32 -0600
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Richard
Post by s***@potato.field
On Thu, 26 Jan 2017 09:30:32 +0000
news.eternal-september.org>, at 09:08:01 on Thu, 26 Jan 2017,
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Roland Perry
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Double articulated trolleybuses have been in use in Switzerland
for some time. Dunno what sort of streets they use them on.
Ones with not huge amounts of other traffic, quite a lot of
mopeds buzzing around, and very few cyclists.
Everywhere? Some Swiss cities have lots of cyclists.
To be honest, I've only seen a couple of Swiss cities that have
such trolleybuses, but they are hilly, and thus not much fun to
cycle in.
I don't think that lakeside Lucerne is particularly hilly?
https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/sets/72157655400441705
Never been there but Geneva and Lausanne are both hilly (the latter
having a specialty railway from the shore to the town centre).
Either way, the cyclists in europe seem to cope with bendy buses
without a problem. Its only the cyclists in this country who were
determined to see them banned despite them being a godsend for the
disabled and parents with buggies. Tells you all you need to know
about a lot of the self righteous snowflakes on bikes we have here.
It always seemed to me that the major risk to bikes was from HGVs, and
the bus thing was the imagination of a mayoral candidate who's grasp
of even what his own opinions were was less than firm and would do
anything for election (to be repeated later).
You never cycled amongst them as I did then. Their length made them a
nightmare to cycle around.
So how do you cope with HGVs? If you feel unsafe cycling around a large
vehicle - then don't. Simple.
They aren't as long and there are far fewer in the bits of central London I
tend to cycle in.
--
Colin Rosenstiel
s***@potato.field
2017-01-27 12:05:52 UTC
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On Fri, 27 Jan 2017 05:47:39 -0600
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by s***@potato.field
So how do you cope with HGVs? If you feel unsafe cycling around a large
vehicle - then don't. Simple.
They aren't as long and there are far fewer in the bits of central London I
tend to cycle in.
They're not that much shorter than bendies but they have a far bigger throw
when the trailer goes around the corner so are actually far more dangerous.
--
Spud
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-01-27 13:05:12 UTC
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Post by s***@potato.field
On Fri, 27 Jan 2017 05:47:39 -0600
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by s***@potato.field
So how do you cope with HGVs? If you feel unsafe cycling around a large
vehicle - then don't. Simple.
They aren't as long and there are far fewer in the bits of central London
I tend to cycle in.
They're not that much shorter than bendies but they have a far bigger
throw when the trailer goes around the corner so are actually far more
dangerous.
There are still far fewer of them and they don't keep pulling in to the kerb
for bus stops. I have to say I don't think I come across one between
Liverpool Street and Westminster and back yesterday.
--
Colin Rosenstiel
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-01-27 00:34:32 UTC
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In article
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Roland Perry
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Double articulated trolleybuses have been in use in Switzerland for
some time. Dunno what sort of streets they use them on.
Ones with not huge amounts of other traffic, quite a lot of mopeds
buzzing around, and very few cyclists.
Everywhere? Some Swiss cities have lots of cyclists.
To be honest, I've only seen a couple of Swiss cities that have
such trolleybuses, but they are hilly, and thus not much fun to
cycle in.
I don't think that lakeside Lucerne is particularly hilly?
https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/sets/72157655400441705
I think that was where I had in mind.
--
Colin Rosenstiel
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