Discussion:
Post Office Railway open from 28th July
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Basil Jet
2017-06-08 00:02:06 UTC
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
Graeme Wall
2017-06-08 06:58:06 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
In the diary.
--
Graeme Wall
This account not read.
tim...
2017-06-08 12:18:02 UTC
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Post by Graeme Wall
Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
In the diary.
you really have to go on the first day

tim
h***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-06-08 15:42:24 UTC
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Post by tim...
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
In the diary.
you really have to go on the first day
tim
I'll likely visit sometime in the autumn.

Has anybody here ever ridden the line in its entirety? It doesn't have
any sort of wayside signalling, does it?
Recliner
2017-06-08 15:55:23 UTC
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Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by tim...
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
In the diary.
you really have to go on the first day
tim
I'll likely visit sometime in the autumn.
Has anybody here ever ridden the line in its entirety? It doesn't have
any sort of wayside signalling, does it?
Given that the original trains were unmanned, what would be the point of
wayside signalling? The trains were stopped and started by turning the
power off and on on the section of track they were travelling on.
h***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-06-08 17:25:44 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by tim...
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
In the diary.
you really have to go on the first day
tim
I'll likely visit sometime in the autumn.
Has anybody here ever ridden the line in its entirety? It doesn't have
any sort of wayside signalling, does it?
Given that the original trains were unmanned, what would be the point of
wayside signalling?
There were some manned, battery-powered trains, however. If there was a
curve in the line that would obscure the line of sight and another train
were stopped beyond the curve?

Also worth noting that the trains could obtain speeds upwards of 35 miles.
Post by Recliner
The trains were stopped and started by turning the
power off and on on the section of track they were travelling on.
Did power supply from the track feed into a relay for the trains' brakes?

What would happen if another, unmanned train were on the track ahead?

Will the tentative journeys on offer run from Whitechapel all the way
out to Paddington via Mt. Pleasant, BTW?
Certes
2017-06-08 18:18:52 UTC
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Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Will the tentative journeys on offer run from Whitechapel all the way
out to Paddington via Mt. Pleasant, BTW?
BBC: "Two new trains, based on the originals, will carry up to 32
passengers on a 0.6 mile (1km) section of the line."
BevanPrice
2017-06-09 08:30:19 UTC
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Post by Certes
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Will the tentative journeys on offer run from Whitechapel all the way
out to Paddington via Mt. Pleasant, BTW?
BBC: "Two new trains, based on the originals, will carry up to 32
passengers on a 0.6 mile (1km) section of the line."
At £16 per 0.6m, it is even more expensive (per mile) than Heathrow Express.
Roland Perry
2017-06-09 08:35:09 UTC
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Post by BevanPrice
Post by Certes
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Will the tentative journeys on offer run from Whitechapel all the way
out to Paddington via Mt. Pleasant, BTW?
BBC: "Two new trains, based on the originals, will carry up to 32
passengers on a 0.6 mile (1km) section of the line."
At £16 per 0.6m, it is even more expensive (per mile) than Heathrow Express.
So is the Snowdon Mountain Railway (at about £5/mile).
--
Roland Perry
David Cantrell
2017-06-12 12:23:53 UTC
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At ?16 per 0.6m, it is even more expensive (per mile) than Heathrow Express.
So is the Snowdon Mountain Railway (at about ?5/mile).
So is Thornton Heath to Selhurst.

Outrageous!
--
David Cantrell | Bourgeois reactionary pig

It's my experience that neither users nor customers can articulate
what it is they want, nor can they evaluate it when they see it
-- Alan Cooper
Anna Noyd-Dryver
2017-06-22 13:21:26 UTC
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Post by BevanPrice
Post by Certes
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Will the tentative journeys on offer run from Whitechapel all the way
out to Paddington via Mt. Pleasant, BTW?
BBC: "Two new trains, based on the originals, will carry up to 32
passengers on a 0.6 mile (1km) section of the line."
At £16 per 0.6m, it is even more expensive (per mile) than Heathrow Express.
Is that 1km each way or 1km round trip?


Anna Noyd-Dryver
Basil Jet
2017-06-08 18:35:25 UTC
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Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Will the tentative journeys on offer run from Whitechapel all the way
out to Paddington via Mt. Pleasant, BTW?
No, there are not enough emergency exit to allow anything beyond a very
short section.
Recliner
2017-06-08 19:36:35 UTC
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Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Recliner
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by tim...
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
In the diary.
you really have to go on the first day
tim
I'll likely visit sometime in the autumn.
Has anybody here ever ridden the line in its entirety? It doesn't have
any sort of wayside signalling, does it?
Given that the original trains were unmanned, what would be the point of
wayside signalling?
There were some manned, battery-powered trains, however. If there was a
curve in the line that would obscure the line of sight and another train
were stopped beyond the curve?
I'm assuming the battery locos only ran when the automatic trains were not
running (ie, when track power was off).
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Also worth noting that the trains could obtain speeds upwards of 35 miles.
Post by Recliner
The trains were stopped and started by turning the
power off and on on the section of track they were travelling on.
Did power supply from the track feed into a relay for the trains' brakes?
Not quite.

Quote:
The trains brakes are held off by electromagnets whilst its receiving power
and on the move, but when it hits a dead section of track the train brakes
are automatically applied and held on by large springs.

When the Railway was first opened, it was controlled from control panels
located in the inter-platform tunnels at the stations. These panels allowed
trains to be shunted in the station, or routed straight on to the next
station. The switch panels were mechanically and electrically interlocked.
Outside each station is a short dead section which brings each train to a
halt. If they can be admitted, the line controller could operate a
receiving lever controlling a camshaft motor which closes three relays
progressively bringing into use three different voltages to control the
trains rate of approach. The first relay energizes the dead section at
normal line voltage, 440 volts and sets the train going, the second relay
reduces the voltage to 206 volts, so slowing up the train without the use
of brakes (remember the 1 in 20 gradient) and the third relay reduces the
voltage to 150 volts which brings the train into the station at 8 miles an
hour. On entering the station, the train rides into a dead section and the
brakes are automatically applied.

1993 saw the installation of a £750,000 computer to take over control of
the system from one central point. The Vaughan computer directly interfaced
with the existing control system. The computer system was bought into
operation section by section, this allowed the system to carry on operating
as normal during the installation. Each station had its own computer,
interfaced to the existing relay system.

The computer could control the progress of each train on the system
automatically, if needed the line controller could take control of any part
of the system, and reroute trains as needed.

http://www.mailrail.co.uk/operation.html
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
What would happen if another, unmanned train were on the track ahead?
The battery loco presumably wouldn't have been running on track sections
occupied by service trains.
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Will the tentative journeys on offer run from Whitechapel all the way
out to Paddington via Mt. Pleasant, BTW?
No, nothing like that. It's just a short demo loop.
h***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-06-09 00:09:23 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Recliner
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by tim...
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
In the diary.
you really have to go on the first day
tim
I'll likely visit sometime in the autumn.
Has anybody here ever ridden the line in its entirety? It doesn't have
any sort of wayside signalling, does it?
Given that the original trains were unmanned, what would be the point of
wayside signalling?
There were some manned, battery-powered trains, however. If there was a
curve in the line that would obscure the line of sight and another train
were stopped beyond the curve?
I'm assuming the battery locos only ran when the automatic trains were not
running (ie, when track power was off).
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Also worth noting that the trains could obtain speeds upwards of 35 miles.
Post by Recliner
The trains were stopped and started by turning the
power off and on on the section of track they were travelling on.
Did power supply from the track feed into a relay for the trains' brakes?
Not quite.
The trains brakes are held off by electromagnets whilst its receiving power
and on the move, but when it hits a dead section of track the train brakes
are automatically applied and held on by large springs.
That's what I actually meant.
Post by Recliner
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
What would happen if another, unmanned train were on the track ahead?
The battery loco presumably wouldn't have been running on track sections
occupied by service trains.
Got it.
Post by Recliner
No, nothing like that. It's just a short demo loop.
What then are the plans for the remaining sections? AIUI, they have
maintained them.
Charles Ellson
2017-06-08 21:42:46 UTC
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Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Recliner
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by tim...
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
In the diary.
you really have to go on the first day
tim
I'll likely visit sometime in the autumn.
Has anybody here ever ridden the line in its entirety? It doesn't have
any sort of wayside signalling, does it?
Given that the original trains were unmanned, what would be the point of
wayside signalling?
There were some manned, battery-powered trains, however. If there was a
curve in the line that would obscure the line of sight and another train
were stopped beyond the curve?
It shouldn't be there, the battery locos were used during overnight
closed periods or to tug failed trains with the power off.
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Also worth noting that the trains could obtain speeds upwards of 35 miles.
Post by Recliner
The trains were stopped and started by turning the
power off and on on the section of track they were travelling on.
Did power supply from the track feed into a relay for the trains' brakes?
Ov - brakes on/normal (spring brakes), 150v (in station area) <15mph,
206v (approaching station), 440v <40 mph.
[http://www.mailrail.co.uk/operation.html]
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
What would happen if another, unmanned train were on the track ahead?
You should have a dead section behind it.
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Will the tentative journeys on offer run from Whitechapel all the way
out to Paddington via Mt. Pleasant, BTW?
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Anna Noyd-Dryver
2017-06-22 13:21:25 UTC
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Post by Charles Ellson
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
What would happen if another, unmanned train were on the track ahead?
You should have a dead section behind it.
A dead section additional to the one which stopped the first train,
presumably?


Anna Noyd-Dryver
Charles Ellson
2017-06-23 07:19:35 UTC
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On Thu, 22 Jun 2017 13:21:25 -0000 (UTC), Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Charles Ellson
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
What would happen if another, unmanned train were on the track ahead?
You should have a dead section behind it.
A dead section additional to the one which stopped the first train,
presumably?
As I remember it, yes. If it was the same dead section then the
following train would be braking at the same point where the now
stationary train braked resulting in both sharing the same final
stopping point (or trying to).

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Anna Noyd-Dryver
2017-06-22 13:21:25 UTC
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Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Recliner
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Has anybody here ever ridden the line in its entirety? It doesn't have
any sort of wayside signalling, does it?
Given that the original trains were unmanned, what would be the point of
wayside signalling?
There were some manned, battery-powered trains, however.
Where 'some' = 'one', IIRC.
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
If there was a
curve in the line that would obscure the line of sight and another train
were stopped beyond the curve?
Presumably the manually driven trains were only allowed out when control
measures were in place to stop automatic trains from running.
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Also worth noting that the trains could obtain speeds upwards of 35 miles.
Post by Recliner
The trains were stopped and started by turning the
power off and on on the section of track they were travelling on.
Did power supply from the track feed into a relay for the trains' brakes?
Yes. AIUI there were three voltages that could be applied, for full speed,
medium and low speed. Zero voltage applied the brakes.
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
What would happen if another, unmanned train were on the track ahead?
I don't know but I'd imagine some measure was in place to prevent
collisions. Perhaps the presence of a train in one section rendered the
previous section dead?
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Will the tentative journeys on offer run from Whitechapel all the way
out to Paddington via Mt. Pleasant, BTW?
No, AIUI it's just from the depot to Mount Pleasant station and back.


Anna Noyd-Dryver
h***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-06-22 15:55:00 UTC
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Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Recliner
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Has anybody here ever ridden the line in its entirety? It doesn't have
any sort of wayside signalling, does it?
Given that the original trains were unmanned, what would be the point of
wayside signalling?
There were some manned, battery-powered trains, however.
Where 'some' = 'one', IIRC.
Got it. I did not know how many manual trains existed, to be honest.
Recliner
2017-06-22 16:15:33 UTC
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Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Recliner
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Has anybody here ever ridden the line in its entirety? It doesn't have
any sort of wayside signalling, does it?
Given that the original trains were unmanned, what would be the point of
wayside signalling?
There were some manned, battery-powered trains, however.
Where 'some' = 'one', IIRC.
Got it. I did not know how many manual trains existed, to be honest.
I'm not sure there were any manual trains as such. I think there was a
manual loco which could shunt the trains.
Anna Noyd-Dryver
2017-06-22 16:30:23 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Recliner
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Has anybody here ever ridden the line in its entirety? It doesn't have
any sort of wayside signalling, does it?
Given that the original trains were unmanned, what would be the point of
wayside signalling?
There were some manned, battery-powered trains, however.
Where 'some' = 'one', IIRC.
Got it. I did not know how many manual trains existed, to be honest.
I'm not sure there were any manual trains as such. I think there was a
manual loco which could shunt the trains.
There was one (royal) passenger carriage. Presumably there were some wagons
for maintenance purposes. Wikipedia is rather unforthcoming on the matter.

It's great to see the railway used again so one shouldn't complain, however
I'd love to see (a) the opportunity to pay to undertake a longer journey,
having signed a waiver about the lack of exits; (b) a demonstration of the
automatic stock using the voltage control system.


Anna Noyd-Dryver
h***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-06-22 22:44:16 UTC
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Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Recliner
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Recliner
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Has anybody here ever ridden the line in its entirety? It doesn't have
any sort of wayside signalling, does it?
Given that the original trains were unmanned, what would be the point of
wayside signalling?
There were some manned, battery-powered trains, however.
Where 'some' = 'one', IIRC.
Got it. I did not know how many manual trains existed, to be honest.
I'm not sure there were any manual trains as such. I think there was a
manual loco which could shunt the trains.
There was one (royal) passenger carriage. Presumably there were some wagons
for maintenance purposes. Wikipedia is rather unforthcoming on the matter.
It's great to see the railway used again so one shouldn't complain, however
I'd love to see (a) the opportunity to pay to undertake a longer journey,
having signed a waiver about the lack of exits; (b) a demonstration of the
automatic stock using the voltage control system.
The HSE would probably seek to bring back the death penalty for that.
Basil Jet
2017-06-22 22:59:38 UTC
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Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
It's great to see the railway used again so one shouldn't complain, however
I'd love to see (a) the opportunity to pay to undertake a longer journey,
having signed a waiver about the lack of exits; (b) a demonstration of the
automatic stock using the voltage control system.
The HSE would probably seek to bring back the death penalty for that.
... and then forbid every effective execution method.
Charles Ellson
2017-06-23 07:23:33 UTC
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Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Recliner
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Recliner
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Has anybody here ever ridden the line in its entirety? It doesn't have
any sort of wayside signalling, does it?
Given that the original trains were unmanned, what would be the point of
wayside signalling?
There were some manned, battery-powered trains, however.
Where 'some' = 'one', IIRC.
Got it. I did not know how many manual trains existed, to be honest.
I'm not sure there were any manual trains as such. I think there was a
manual loco which could shunt the trains.
There was one (royal) passenger carriage.
One of the normal vehicles suitably modified IIRC.
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Presumably there were some wagons
for maintenance purposes.
Normal vehicles with the mail carriers left behind and the spring
brakes held off ?
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Wikipedia is rather unforthcoming on the matter.
It's great to see the railway used again so one shouldn't complain, however
I'd love to see (a) the opportunity to pay to undertake a longer journey,
having signed a waiver about the lack of exits; (b) a demonstration of the
automatic stock using the voltage control system.
The HSE would probably seek to bring back the death penalty for that.
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Scott
2017-06-08 18:15:12 UTC
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Post by tim...
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
In the diary.
you really have to go on the first day
He may not have put it in the diary for the first day :-)
tim...
2017-06-08 18:36:31 UTC
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Post by Scott
Post by tim...
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
In the diary.
you really have to go on the first day
He may not have put it in the diary for the first day :-)
but surely if the intention is to visit at some time in the future, you can
remember a more approximate date (August for example) without diarising it

tim
Scott
2017-06-08 19:21:51 UTC
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Post by tim...
Post by Scott
Post by tim...
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
In the diary.
you really have to go on the first day
He may not have put it in the diary for the first day :-)
but surely if the intention is to visit at some time in the future, you can
remember a more approximate date (August for example) without diarising it
Personally, no. If I want to do something I find it best to get it
into the diary (a) to stop me arranging something else on the same day
by mistake and (b) as an incentive to make it happen. I sometimes
put TV programmes in the diary to make sure I don't forget to watch or
record.
tim...
2017-06-08 21:13:52 UTC
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Post by Scott
Post by tim...
Post by Scott
Post by tim...
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
In the diary.
you really have to go on the first day
He may not have put it in the diary for the first day :-)
but surely if the intention is to visit at some time in the future, you can
remember a more approximate date (August for example) without diarising it
Personally, no. If I want to do something I find it best to get it
into the diary (a) to stop me arranging something else on the same day
by mistake and (b) as an incentive to make it happen. I sometimes
put TV programmes in the diary to make sure I don't forget to watch or
record.
but "catch up" excepted (which doesn't always work) you may only get one
chance to watch/record a TV program

once this museum is open, there are hundreds of future occasion that you can
visit

tim
Recliner
2017-06-08 21:13:35 UTC
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Post by tim...
Post by Scott
Post by tim...
Post by Scott
Post by tim...
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
In the diary.
you really have to go on the first day
He may not have put it in the diary for the first day :-)
but surely if the intention is to visit at some time in the future, you can
remember a more approximate date (August for example) without diarising it
Personally, no. If I want to do something I find it best to get it
into the diary (a) to stop me arranging something else on the same day
by mistake and (b) as an incentive to make it happen. I sometimes
put TV programmes in the diary to make sure I don't forget to watch or
record.
but "catch up" excepted (which doesn't always work) you may only get one
chance to watch/record a TV program
once this museum is open, there are hundreds of future occasion that you can
visit
Yes, I would deliberately avoid the first day. I'd rather go when any early
glitches have been sorted, and it's less crowded.
Scott
2017-06-09 11:36:13 UTC
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Post by tim...
Post by Scott
Post by tim...
Post by Scott
Post by tim...
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
In the diary.
you really have to go on the first day
He may not have put it in the diary for the first day :-)
but surely if the intention is to visit at some time in the future, you can
remember a more approximate date (August for example) without diarising it
Personally, no. If I want to do something I find it best to get it
into the diary (a) to stop me arranging something else on the same day
by mistake and (b) as an incentive to make it happen. I sometimes
put TV programmes in the diary to make sure I don't forget to watch or
record.
but "catch up" excepted (which doesn't always work) you may only get one
chance to watch/record a TV program
once this museum is open, there are hundreds of future occasion that you can
visit
I attach a mystical quality to my diary. If it's in the diary this
makes if far more likely to happen.

I accept we all operate differently.
Graeme Wall
2017-06-08 19:22:39 UTC
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Post by tim...
Post by Scott
Post by tim...
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
In the diary.
you really have to go on the first day
He may not have put it in the diary for the first day :-)
but surely if the intention is to visit at some time in the future, you
can remember a more approximate date (August for example) without
diarising it
I'm now puzzled Tim, did you mean I ought to go on the first day or why
do I have to go on the first day?
--
Graeme Wall
This account not read.
tim...
2017-06-08 21:14:43 UTC
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Post by tim...
Post by Scott
Post by tim...
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
In the diary.
you really have to go on the first day
He may not have put it in the diary for the first day :-)
but surely if the intention is to visit at some time in the future, you
can remember a more approximate date (August for example) without
diarising it
I'm now puzzled Tim, did you mean I ought to go on the first day or why do
I have to go on the first day?
why are you recording the first day it is opening, if you don't intend on
visiting it ASAP

tim
Graeme Wall
2017-06-09 07:41:13 UTC
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Post by tim...
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by tim...
Post by Scott
Post by tim...
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
In the diary.
you really have to go on the first day
He may not have put it in the diary for the first day :-)
but surely if the intention is to visit at some time in the future,
you can remember a more approximate date (August for example) without
diarising it
I'm now puzzled Tim, did you mean I ought to go on the first day or
why do I have to go on the first day?
why are you recording the first day it is opening, if you don't intend
on visiting it ASAP
I could be making a note to avoid it that day as it will be crowded.
--
Graeme Wall
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tim...
2017-06-09 08:14:13 UTC
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Post by Graeme Wall
Post by tim...
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by tim...
Post by Scott
Post by tim...
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
In the diary.
you really have to go on the first day
He may not have put it in the diary for the first day :-)
but surely if the intention is to visit at some time in the future, you
can remember a more approximate date (August for example) without
diarising it
I'm now puzzled Tim, did you mean I ought to go on the first day or why
do I have to go on the first day?
why are you recording the first day it is opening, if you don't intend on
visiting it ASAP
I could be making a note to avoid it that day as it will be crowded.
but if you didn't note it at all you wont know that it was open
Graeme Wall
2017-06-09 09:02:09 UTC
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Post by tim...
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by tim...
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by tim...
Post by Scott
Post by tim...
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
In the diary.
you really have to go on the first day
He may not have put it in the diary for the first day :-)
but surely if the intention is to visit at some time in the future,
you can remember a more approximate date (August for example)
without diarising it
I'm now puzzled Tim, did you mean I ought to go on the first day or
why do I have to go on the first day?
why are you recording the first day it is opening, if you don't
intend on visiting it ASAP
I could be making a note to avoid it that day as it will be crowded.
but if you didn't note it at all you wont know that it was open
Again I could just be using a figure of speech to note that I was aware
it would be open from <date> so could visit it after that time if I so
wished.
--
Graeme Wall
This account not read.
d***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-06-08 22:12:53 UTC
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On Thu, 8 Jun 2017 20:22:39 +0100, Graeme Wall
Post by Graeme Wall
I'm now puzzled Tim, did you mean I ought to go on the first day or why
do I have to go on the first day?
Will there be a small section of new track at the loop?
A trip around that would be a first day cover,
Frankly I don't think we will ever stamp out tenacious suggestions on
UKR.

G.Harman
Graeme Wall
2017-06-08 19:21:30 UTC
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Post by Scott
Post by tim...
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
In the diary.
you really have to go on the first day
He may not have put it in the diary for the first day :-)
I'm not going but my diary is :-)
--
Graeme Wall
This account not read.
d***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-06-08 18:44:33 UTC
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On Thu, 8 Jun 2017 07:58:06 +0100, Graeme Wall
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
In the diary.
Will it have first and second class services?

G.Harman
s***@potato.field
2017-06-08 08:21:29 UTC
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On Thu, 8 Jun 2017 01:02:06 +0100
Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
Its a shame that what is in effect a national asset has gone to waste. Given
the traffic situation in London there must be some business case for it.
--
Spud
Roland Perry
2017-06-08 09:27:45 UTC
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Post by s***@potato.field
Its a shame that what is in effect a national asset has gone to waste. Given
the traffic situation in London there must be some business case for it.
Moving freight between places which are no longer suitable railheads ?
--
Roland Perry
s***@potato.field
2017-06-08 10:04:18 UTC
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On Thu, 8 Jun 2017 10:27:45 +0100
Post by Roland Perry
Post by s***@potato.field
Its a shame that what is in effect a national asset has gone to waste. Given
the traffic situation in London there must be some business case for it.
Moving freight between places which are no longer suitable railheads ?
I was thinking more in-city style deliveries. It must take a van about an hour
to cross central london during the day.
--
Spud
Roland Perry
2017-06-08 12:42:36 UTC
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Post by s***@potato.field
Post by Roland Perry
Post by s***@potato.field
Its a shame that what is in effect a national asset has gone to waste. Given
the traffic situation in London there must be some business case for it.
Moving freight between places which are no longer suitable railheads ?
I was thinking more in-city style deliveries. It must take a van about an hour
to cross central london during the day.
Are you proposing to open dozens of new stations?
--
Roland Perry
Charles Ellson
2017-06-08 21:45:38 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
Post by s***@potato.field
Post by Roland Perry
Post by s***@potato.field
Its a shame that what is in effect a national asset has gone to waste. Given
the traffic situation in London there must be some business case for it.
The sorting offices have long been dispersed away from Central London
and well away from the PO railway.
Post by Roland Perry
Post by s***@potato.field
Post by Roland Perry
Moving freight between places which are no longer suitable railheads ?
I was thinking more in-city style deliveries. It must take a van about an hour
to cross central london during the day.
Are you proposing to open dozens of new stations?
---
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Recliner
2017-06-08 22:10:50 UTC
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Post by Charles Ellson
Post by s***@potato.field
Its a shame that what is in effect a national asset has gone to waste. Given
the traffic situation in London there must be some business case for it.
The sorting offices have long been dispersed away from Central London
and well away from the PO railway.
Yes, it clearly had no remaining use for the Royal Mail.

Cargo also seems unlikely. At best, it could be used for data or power
cables.
Charles Ellson
2017-06-09 06:11:05 UTC
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On Thu, 8 Jun 2017 22:10:50 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Charles Ellson
Post by s***@potato.field
Its a shame that what is in effect a national asset has gone to waste. Given
the traffic situation in London there must be some business case for it.
The sorting offices have long been dispersed away from Central London
and well away from the PO railway.
Yes, it clearly had no remaining use for the Royal Mail.
Cargo also seems unlikely. At best, it could be used for data or power
cables.
Again, possibly too remote from the supply end for power cables.
For comms, maybe only usable if the two ends are conveniently close to
the existing stations but fibre-optic cables only need a reserved
space on the cable bearers rather than the entire tunnel as would
necessarily be the case with HV cables. BT already has a more
extensive tunnel system.

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Basil Jet
2017-06-13 16:35:46 UTC
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Post by Charles Ellson
Post by s***@potato.field
Its a shame that what is in effect a national asset has gone to waste. Given
the traffic situation in London there must be some business case for it.
The sorting offices have long been dispersed away from Central London
and well away from the PO railway.
I'm pretty sure, if memory serves me rightly, that the thing that ended the viability of the PO railway was the opening of the major postal distribution hub at Willesden. Some people did suggest extending the POR there, but that was pretty much a non-starter - can you imagine the cost?
No imagination this country , what would be wrong with a bit of mixed
gauge out of Euston.
Since rail ferries carry trains on boats, and Le Shuttle carries cars on
trains, why not have a train-train which carries the PO railway wagons
on mainline gauge flat wagons with narrow gauge rails laid on top of
them? There should be enough paths on the DC lines for them. The only
problem (yes, I did say *only* problem) would be that the mainline
railway runs in the day and is maintained at night whereas the PO
railway ran at night and was maintained in the morning IIRC.
Arthur Figgis
2017-06-13 17:12:09 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
Since rail ferries carry trains on boats, and Le Shuttle carries cars on
trains, why not have a train-train which carries the PO railway wagons
on mainline gauge flat wagons with narrow gauge rails laid on top of
them?
https://www.flickr.com/photos/train-pix/14875380020

(Glasgow subway gauge)
--
Arthur Figgis Surrey, UK
Basil Jet
2017-06-13 17:31:59 UTC
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Post by Arthur Figgis
Post by Basil Jet
Since rail ferries carry trains on boats, and Le Shuttle carries cars on
trains, why not have a train-train which carries the PO railway wagons
on mainline gauge flat wagons with narrow gauge rails laid on top of
them?
https://www.flickr.com/photos/train-pix/14875380020
(Glasgow subway gauge)
Great stuff... I thought you meant the carried trains were Subway gauge,
but no, the carrying train is Subway gauge!
Graeme Wall
2017-06-13 19:20:41 UTC
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Post by Arthur Figgis
Post by Basil Jet
Since rail ferries carry trains on boats, and Le Shuttle carries cars on
trains, why not have a train-train which carries the PO railway wagons
on mainline gauge flat wagons with narrow gauge rails laid on top of
them?
https://www.flickr.com/photos/train-pix/14875380020
(Glasgow subway gauge)
My Goodness, even narrow gauge locos on broad gauge wagons, 5th photo down:

<http://www.irsociety.co.uk/Archives/22/Guinness.htm>
--
Graeme Wall
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Offramp
2017-06-08 11:57:03 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
Now that it is up and running again I think it should be renamed the Queen Elizabeth Post Office Railway.
Robin
2017-06-08 13:08:58 UTC
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Post by Offramp
Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
Now that it is up and running again I think it should be renamed the Queen Elizabeth Post Office Railway.
It'd be a bit late but I think The George V Line would be more appropriate.
--
Robin
reply-to address is (intended to be) valid
Basil Jet
2017-07-10 01:36:33 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
The words "MAIL RAIL" have now appeared in very large letters on the
Phoenix Place side of the Mount Pleasant site. It looks rather
unfinished for something supposedly opening in 18 days.
Offramp
2017-07-10 08:06:36 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
They should have a first class and a second class section.
Optimist
2017-07-10 08:33:10 UTC
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Post by Offramp
Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
They should have a first class and a second class section.
Is there a restaurant car?
Recliner
2017-07-10 16:10:38 UTC
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Post by Optimist
Post by Offramp
Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
They should have a first class and a second class section.
Is there a restaurant car?
I wouldn't be surprised if the museum has a cafe. I wonder if the food will
have a Mail theme?
Roland Perry
2017-07-10 16:55:51 UTC
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In message
<1649995202.521395976.236725.recliner.ng-***@news.eternal-sept
ember.org>, at 16:10:38 on Mon, 10 Jul 2017, Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Optimist
Post by Offramp
They should have a first class and a second class section.
Is there a restaurant car?
I wouldn't be surprised if the museum has a cafe. I wonder if the food will
have a Mail theme?
Grilled jiffybag with Signature (on delivery) sauce?
--
Roland Perry
Basil Jet
2017-07-11 03:10:55 UTC
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Post by Recliner
I wouldn't be surprised if the museum has a cafe. I wonder if the food will
have a Mail theme?
Apart from being second class?
Recliner
2017-07-11 05:02:25 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
I wouldn't be surprised if the museum has a cafe. I wonder if the food will
have a Mail theme?
Apart from being second class?
There might be battered and shredded dishes on the menu?

And perhaps they'll deliver someone else's order to you?
Basil Jet
2017-07-11 12:14:33 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
I wouldn't be surprised if the museum has a cafe. I wonder if the food will
have a Mail theme?
Apart from being second class?
There might be battered and shredded dishes on the menu?
I'm sure the COD will be battered.
Recliner
2017-07-13 22:03:00 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
I wouldn't be surprised if the museum has a cafe. I wonder if the food will
have a Mail theme?
Apart from being second class?
There might be battered and shredded dishes on the menu?
I'm sure the COD will be battered.
I'd hope they have snail dishes on the mail menu.
h***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-07-13 16:27:02 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
I wouldn't be surprised if the museum has a cafe. I wonder if the food will
have a Mail theme?
Apart from being second class?
;)
Recliner
2017-07-17 15:04:43 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40189937
Just in case anyone was planning to go for the grand opening next week, be
aware that the railway has been delayed in the mail, and won't open till
September.
Roland Perry
2017-07-17 15:31:53 UTC
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In message
<159902951.521996794.470713.recliner.ng-***@news.eternal-septe
mber.org>, at 15:04:43 on Mon, 17 Jul 2017, Recliner
Post by Recliner
Just in case anyone was planning to go for the grand opening next week, be
aware that the railway has been delayed in the mail, and won't open till
September.
They should have used Special Delivery.
--
Roland Perry
Recliner
2017-07-27 23:24:45 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
In message
mber.org>, at 15:04:43 on Mon, 17 Jul 2017, Recliner
Post by Recliner
Just in case anyone was planning to go for the grand opening next week, be
aware that the railway has been delayed in the mail, and won't open till
September.
They should have used Special Delivery.
It was delivered to Newsnight tonight. The tunnel stalactites are still
there, and they've tried to leave everything as it was on the last day of
operation.

Reassuringly, apparently, the tunnels are largely rat-free, as they never
had passengers dropping food to feed the rodents.
Basil Jet
2017-07-27 23:46:34 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Reassuringly, apparently, the tunnels are largely rat-free, as they never
had passengers dropping food to feed the rodents.
... until now.
Recliner
2017-07-27 23:57:54 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
Reassuringly, apparently, the tunnels are largely rat-free, as they never
had passengers dropping food to feed the rodents.
... until now.
Indeed…
Basil Jet
2017-07-28 00:44:16 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Indeed…
I've never seen three dots as a single character before. How did you do
that?
Recliner
2017-07-28 00:59:18 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
Indeed…
I've never seen three dots as a single character before. How did you do
that?
It's the ellipsis character. It's available on my selected iPad keyboard,
and Word does an automatic substitution if your keyboard lacks it.

Some other grown-up characters on my keyboard include —, – as well as -;
π; æ; µ; §; ƒ; Ω; ¶; ∞; ©; ®; †; ∫; «; ; ‰; Ø; ™; ¥; ß; ∂; ∆; •; ¿; Ω; √;
∑; Æ, etc. Of course, I don't know if you'll see the same symbols on your
screen as I typed…
Basil Jet
2017-07-28 01:31:48 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
Indeed…
I've never seen three dots as a single character before. How did you do
that?
It's the ellipsis character. It's available on my selected iPad keyboard,
and Word does an automatic substitution if your keyboard lacks it.
Some other grown-up characters on my keyboard include —, – as well as -;
π; æ; µ; §; ƒ; Ω; ¶; ∞; ©; ®; †; ∫; «; ; ‰; Ø; ™; ¥; ß; ∂; ∆; •; ¿; Ω; √;
∑; Æ, etc. Of course, I don't know if you'll see the same symbols on your
screen as I typed…
All coming up fine in Thunderbird on my MacBook. I can't seem to enter
them on my iPhone 4S (with its slightly out of date operating system)
though.
Graeme Wall
2017-07-28 07:56:54 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
Indeed…
I've never seen three dots as a single character before. How did you do
that?
It's the ellipsis character. It's available on my selected iPad keyboard,
and Word does an automatic substitution if your keyboard lacks it.
Some other grown-up characters on my keyboard include —, – as well as -;
π; æ; µ; §; ƒ; Ω; ¶; ∞; ©; ®; †; ∫; «; ; ‰; Ø; ™; ¥; ß; ∂; ∆; •; ¿; Ω; √;
∑; Æ, etc. Of course, I don't know if you'll see the same symbols on your
screen as I typed…
<alt>;
--
Graeme Wall
This account not read.
Basil Jet
2017-07-28 13:13:42 UTC
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Post by Graeme Wall
Post by Recliner
Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
Indeed…
I've never seen three dots as a single character before. How did you do
that?
It's the ellipsis character. It's available on my selected iPad keyboard,
and Word does an automatic substitution if your keyboard lacks it.
Some other grown-up characters on my keyboard include —, – as well as -;
π; æ; µ; §; ƒ; Ω; ¶; ∞; ©; ®; †; ∫; «; ; ‰; Ø; ™; ¥; ß; ∂; ∆; •; ¿;
Ω; √;
∑; Æ, etc. Of course, I don't know if you'll see the same symbols on your
screen as I typed…
<alt>;
;)
Offramp
2017-07-28 02:31:54 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
Indeed…
I've never seen three dots as a single character before. How did you do
that?
How did you know it was a single character?
Basil Jet
2017-07-28 13:15:27 UTC
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Post by Offramp
Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
Indeed…
I've never seen three dots as a single character before. How did you do
that?
How did you know it was a single character?
It looked much more closely spaced than three dots, so I tried and
failed to delete a third of it.

Offramp
2017-07-28 10:38:52 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Reassuringly, apparently, the tunnels are largely rat-free, as they never
had passengers dropping food to feed the rodents.
That has always puzzled me in horror films: loads of cobwebs and rats in damp cellars and metal tunnels where flies and humans apparently never go
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