Discussion:
Stansted Transit (photos)
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Recliner
2018-04-30 22:36:36 UTC
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On a recent trip through Stansted, I happened to get a position at the
front of the little transit train on the way to Satellite 2 so I whipped
out my pocket camera and took a few pictures.

<https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/sets/72157668434701408>

While waiting for the delayed flight in the Satellite, I realised that the
long underground transit ride had actualy brought us back to a satellite
pier that's also connected directly to the terminal building with a
walkway. I was, of course, aware that the underground route has a long
curve, but hadn't realised that it takes you almost back to where you
started. It's certainly an unusual route for an airport satellite pier
shuttle, and the convulated route seems to be based on the original plan
for another satellite pier where the cargo terminal now stands.

Stansted has one passenger terminal with three satellite piers as well as a
nearby freight terminal. All passenger gates are on the satellites, not the
main terminal building. The three satellites are each connected to the
terminal in a different way:

- Starting at the north east, Satellite 3 is used by international flights
using gates 40-59. It's connected to the righthand corner of the terminal
by an up-down dog-leg passage, used by all passengers. The transit is not
used. I think this spartan satellite is used exclusively by Ryanair.

- The centre Satellite 2 is used by both domestic (gates 81-88) and
international (gates 20-39) flights. The domestic gates are closest to the
terminal, and passengers access the terminal using a straight, direct
overhead walkway, not the transit. But the international gates further
along the satellite are accessed by the underground transit which follows a
long J-shaped route to get there.

- The southwest Satellite is remote from the terminal. Its international
gates 1-19 can be accessed only via the transit.

- The cargo terminal is further to the southwest. It doesn't have a transit
station, but perhaps surprisingly, the transit passes underneath it, and
could easily have a station had another passenger satellite been built
there.


So, when you set off from the terminal, you descend into the tunnel,
heading southwest, passing just underneath the walkway to Satellite 2. As
you enter the tunnel portal, you're just passing the end of Satellite 1
(but can't see it).

The tunnel then continues straight for some distance, taking you under the
southern end of the cargo terminal. It then has a long 180 degree bend,
after which you pass back under the cargo terminal, heading northeast. This
is where there could have been a station had another (fourth) passenger
satellite been built, as BAA originally intended.

The line continues underground, under Apron A, heading northeast, until you
get to the station under Satellite 1. It then continues in a straight line
under Apron B, to Satellite 2, the final station. At this point, almost two
miles after you started on the transit journey, you're within 150m of the
starting station at the terminal. You could have walked it quicker!

The transit then crosses over to the other tunnel, and retraces its journey
for arriving passengers, again taking them on a two mile journey to cover
the direct distance of about 150m to the arrivals station at the terminal
(which is just along from the departures station).

This map (from Wikipedia) makes it clearer:
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/sets/72157668434701408>

Stansted is running at well below its runway capacity. If it ever grows to
need more passenger terminal capacity, it will simply need a new, fourth
satellite replacing the current cargo terminal, with a station on the
transit line running directly underneath. There's plenty of room to move
the cargo handling area to the west, or north of the runway.
Graeme Wall
2018-05-01 06:39:50 UTC
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Post by Recliner
On a recent trip through Stansted, I happened to get a position at the
front of the little transit train on the way to Satellite 2 so I whipped
out my pocket camera and took a few pictures.
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/sets/72157668434701408>
While waiting for the delayed flight in the Satellite, I realised that the
long underground transit ride had actualy brought us back to a satellite
pier that's also connected directly to the terminal building with a
walkway. I was, of course, aware that the underground route has a long
curve, but hadn't realised that it takes you almost back to where you
started. It's certainly an unusual route for an airport satellite pier
shuttle, and the convulated route seems to be based on the original plan
for another satellite pier where the cargo terminal now stands.
Stansted has one passenger terminal with three satellite piers as well as a
nearby freight terminal. All passenger gates are on the satellites, not the
main terminal building. The three satellites are each connected to the
- Starting at the north east, Satellite 3 is used by international flights
using gates 40-59. It's connected to the righthand corner of the terminal
by an up-down dog-leg passage, used by all passengers. The transit is not
used. I think this spartan satellite is used exclusively by Ryanair.
- The centre Satellite 2 is used by both domestic (gates 81-88) and
international (gates 20-39) flights. The domestic gates are closest to the
terminal, and passengers access the terminal using a straight, direct
overhead walkway, not the transit. But the international gates further
along the satellite are accessed by the underground transit which follows a
long J-shaped route to get there.
- The southwest Satellite is remote from the terminal. Its international
gates 1-19 can be accessed only via the transit.
- The cargo terminal is further to the southwest. It doesn't have a transit
station, but perhaps surprisingly, the transit passes underneath it, and
could easily have a station had another passenger satellite been built
there.
So, when you set off from the terminal, you descend into the tunnel,
heading southwest, passing just underneath the walkway to Satellite 2. As
you enter the tunnel portal, you're just passing the end of Satellite 1
(but can't see it).
The tunnel then continues straight for some distance, taking you under the
southern end of the cargo terminal. It then has a long 180 degree bend,
after which you pass back under the cargo terminal, heading northeast. This
is where there could have been a station had another (fourth) passenger
satellite been built, as BAA originally intended.
The line continues underground, under Apron A, heading northeast, until you
get to the station under Satellite 1. It then continues in a straight line
under Apron B, to Satellite 2, the final station. At this point, almost two
miles after you started on the transit journey, you're within 150m of the
starting station at the terminal. You could have walked it quicker!
The transit then crosses over to the other tunnel, and retraces its journey
for arriving passengers, again taking them on a two mile journey to cover
the direct distance of about 150m to the arrivals station at the terminal
(which is just along from the departures station).
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/sets/72157668434701408>
Stansted is running at well below its runway capacity. If it ever grows to
need more passenger terminal capacity, it will simply need a new, fourth
satellite replacing the current cargo terminal, with a station on the
transit line running directly underneath. There's plenty of room to move
the cargo handling area to the west, or north of the runway.
Wasn't the original idea that it would form a closed loop when/if they
built a 4th satellite at the right hand end?
--
Graeme Wall
This account not read.
Roland Perry
2018-05-01 06:55:07 UTC
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Post by Graeme Wall
Wasn't the original idea that it would form a closed loop when/if they
built a 4th satellite at the right hand end?
You'd need another huge ramp, and portals, though.
--
Roland Perry
Graeme Wall
2018-05-01 09:25:46 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
Post by Graeme Wall
Wasn't the original idea that it would form a closed loop when/if they
built a 4th satellite at the right hand end?
You'd need another huge ramp, and portals, though.
True, but not that difficult in the scheme of things.
--
Graeme Wall
This account not read.
Roland Perry
2018-05-01 06:43:08 UTC
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<430976189.546814570.147307.recliner.ng-***@news.eternal-septe
mber.org>, at 22:36:36 on Mon, 30 Apr 2018, Recliner
Post by Recliner
On a recent trip through Stansted, I happened to get a position at the
front of the little transit train on the way to Satellite 2 so I whipped
out my pocket camera and took a few pictures.
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/sets/72157668434701408>
While waiting for the delayed flight in the Satellite, I realised that the
long underground transit ride had actualy brought us back to a satellite
pier that's also connected directly to the terminal building with a
walkway. I was, of course, aware that the underground route has a long
curve, but hadn't realised that it takes you almost back to where you
started.
It's fairly obvious where the satellites are relative to the main
building (by looking out of the window!), so I'm surprised at your
surprise.
Post by Recliner
It's certainly an unusual route for an airport satellite pier
shuttle, and the convulated route seems to be based on the original plan
for another satellite pier where the cargo terminal now stands.
Did you take a picture of the track from the portal to where the curve
begins, because that would be the most unexpected part for most
travellers.
Post by Recliner
Stansted has one passenger terminal with three satellite piers as well as a
nearby freight terminal. All passenger gates are on the satellites, not the
main terminal building. The three satellites are each connected to the
- Starting at the north east, Satellite 3 is used by international flights
using gates 40-59. It's connected to the righthand corner of the terminal
by an up-down dog-leg passage, used by all passengers. The transit is not
used. I think this spartan satellite is used exclusively by Ryanair.
That satellite used to be just the shed at the end (in fact, I think a
predecessor of that shed). It was built for BA's low cost airline 'Go'
and the only way to reach it was by bus from where the current walkway
departs the main terminal.

In the mean time, it's been extended to make a more conventional
terminal.
--
Roland Perry
Recliner
2018-05-01 13:18:29 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
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mber.org>, at 22:36:36 on Mon, 30 Apr 2018, Recliner
Post by Recliner
On a recent trip through Stansted, I happened to get a position at the
front of the little transit train on the way to Satellite 2 so I whipped
out my pocket camera and took a few pictures.
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/sets/72157668434701408>
While waiting for the delayed flight in the Satellite, I realised that the
long underground transit ride had actualy brought us back to a satellite
pier that's also connected directly to the terminal building with a
walkway. I was, of course, aware that the underground route has a long
curve, but hadn't realised that it takes you almost back to where you
started.
It's fairly obvious where the satellites are relative to the main
building (by looking out of the window!), so I'm surprised at your
surprise.
It was the underground route of the shuttle that surprised me: I
hadn't realised it went past and under the cargo terminal. Also, I'd
not previously noticed that Satellite 2 had a direct walkway to the
terminal; I'd always assumed it was further to the southwest.
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
It's certainly an unusual route for an airport satellite pier
shuttle, and the convulated route seems to be based on the original plan
for another satellite pier where the cargo terminal now stands.
Did you take a picture of the track from the portal to where the curve
begins, because that would be the most unexpected part for most
travellers.
Yes, it turns out that I did:
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/41108679764/in/album-72157668434701408/lightbox/>
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Stansted has one passenger terminal with three satellite piers as well as a
nearby freight terminal. All passenger gates are on the satellites, not the
main terminal building. The three satellites are each connected to the
- Starting at the north east, Satellite 3 is used by international flights
using gates 40-59. It's connected to the righthand corner of the terminal
by an up-down dog-leg passage, used by all passengers. The transit is not
used. I think this spartan satellite is used exclusively by Ryanair.
That satellite used to be just the shed at the end (in fact, I think a
predecessor of that shed). It was built for BA's low cost airline 'Go'
and the only way to reach it was by bus from where the current walkway
departs the main terminal.
In the mean time, it's been extended to make a more conventional
terminal.
Ah, I wasn't aware of that. I seldom use Stansted, and never used Go.
Roland Perry
2018-05-01 14:12:44 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
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mber.org>, at 22:36:36 on Mon, 30 Apr 2018, Recliner
Post by Recliner
On a recent trip through Stansted, I happened to get a position at the
front of the little transit train on the way to Satellite 2 so I whipped
out my pocket camera and took a few pictures.
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/sets/72157668434701408>
While waiting for the delayed flight in the Satellite, I realised that the
long underground transit ride had actualy brought us back to a satellite
pier that's also connected directly to the terminal building with a
walkway. I was, of course, aware that the underground route has a long
curve, but hadn't realised that it takes you almost back to where you
started.
It's fairly obvious where the satellites are relative to the main
building (by looking out of the window!), so I'm surprised at your
surprise.
It was the underground route of the shuttle that surprised me: I
hadn't realised it went past and under the cargo terminal.
I'm becoming less and less convinced it does.
Post by Recliner
Also, I'd not previously noticed that Satellite 2 had a direct walkway
to the terminal; I'd always assumed it was further to the southwest.
Again, you can see it out of the terminal window!
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
It's certainly an unusual route for an airport satellite pier
shuttle, and the convulated route seems to be based on the original plan
for another satellite pier where the cargo terminal now stands.
Did you take a picture of the track from the portal to where the curve
begins, because that would be the most unexpected part for most
travellers.
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/41108679764/in/album-72157668434
701408/lightbox/>
It's difficult to see the distance, and is it really further from the
portal to the start of the bend, as from the station to the portal (as
suggested by some mapping sources)?
--
Roland Perry
Recliner
2018-05-01 15:35:42 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
In message
mber.org>, at 22:36:36 on Mon, 30 Apr 2018, Recliner
Post by Recliner
On a recent trip through Stansted, I happened to get a position at the
front of the little transit train on the way to Satellite 2 so I whipped
out my pocket camera and took a few pictures.
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/sets/72157668434701408>
While waiting for the delayed flight in the Satellite, I realised that the
long underground transit ride had actualy brought us back to a satellite
pier that's also connected directly to the terminal building with a
walkway. I was, of course, aware that the underground route has a long
curve, but hadn't realised that it takes you almost back to where you
started.
It's fairly obvious where the satellites are relative to the main
building (by looking out of the window!), so I'm surprised at your
surprise.
It was the underground route of the shuttle that surprised me: I
hadn't realised it went past and under the cargo terminal.
I'm becoming less and less convinced it does.
I'm going by this map, but I can't verify if the underground section is
Post by Roland Perry
https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/41802404401/in/photostream/lightbox/>
Post by Recliner
Also, I'd not previously noticed that Satellite 2 had a direct walkway
to the terminal; I'd always assumed it was further to the southwest.
Again, you can see it out of the terminal window!
I'd never noticed, on my few trips through the airport.
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
It's certainly an unusual route for an airport satellite pier
shuttle, and the convulated route seems to be based on the original plan
for another satellite pier where the cargo terminal now stands.
Did you take a picture of the track from the portal to where the curve
begins, because that would be the most unexpected part for most
travellers.
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/41108679764/in/album-72157668434
701408/lightbox/>
It's difficult to see the distance, and is it really further from the
portal to the start of the bend, as from the station to the portal (as
suggested by some mapping sources)?
I don't know. I've not spotted any clues to the tunnel's location from
aerial shots/
Roland Perry
2018-05-01 18:17:35 UTC
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<638251552.546881110.972930.recliner.ng-***@news.eternal-septe
mber.org>, at 15:35:42 on Tue, 1 May 2018, Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
On a recent trip through Stansted, I happened to get a position at the
front of the little transit train on the way to Satellite 2 so I whipped
out my pocket camera and took a few pictures.
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/sets/72157668434701408>
While waiting for the delayed flight in the Satellite, I realised that the
long underground transit ride had actualy brought us back to a satellite
pier that's also connected directly to the terminal building with a
walkway. I was, of course, aware that the underground route has a long
curve, but hadn't realised that it takes you almost back to where you
started.
It's fairly obvious where the satellites are relative to the main
building (by looking out of the window!), so I'm surprised at your
surprise.
It was the underground route of the shuttle that surprised me: I
hadn't realised it went past and under the cargo terminal.
I'm becoming less and less convinced it does.
I'm going by this map, but I can't verify if the underground section is
Post by Roland Perry
https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/41802404401/in/photostream/lightbox/>
Let's look in the opposite direction:



At 1:55 the train leaves the existing satellite station and almost
immediately curves round to the left.
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/41108679764/in/album-72157668434
701408/lightbox/>
It's difficult to see the distance, and is it really further from the
portal to the start of the bend, as from the station to the portal (as
suggested by some mapping sources)?
I don't know. I've not spotted any clues to the tunnel's location from
aerial shots/
I was hoping your [additional] photo showed how far the tunnel went
underground before curving around to the right.
--
Roland Perry
Recliner
2018-05-01 21:49:16 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
In message
mber.org>, at 15:35:42 on Tue, 1 May 2018, Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
On a recent trip through Stansted, I happened to get a position at the
front of the little transit train on the way to Satellite 2 so I whipped
out my pocket camera and took a few pictures.
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/sets/72157668434701408>
While waiting for the delayed flight in the Satellite, I realised that the
long underground transit ride had actualy brought us back to a satellite
pier that's also connected directly to the terminal building with a
walkway. I was, of course, aware that the underground route has a long
curve, but hadn't realised that it takes you almost back to where you
started.
It's fairly obvious where the satellites are relative to the main
building (by looking out of the window!), so I'm surprised at your
surprise.
It was the underground route of the shuttle that surprised me: I
hadn't realised it went past and under the cargo terminal.
I'm becoming less and less convinced it does.
I'm going by this map, but I can't verify if the underground section is
Post by Roland Perry
https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/41802404401/in/photostream/lightbox/>
http://youtu.be/yRqbXwmxE4I
At 1:55 the train leaves the existing satellite station and almost
immediately curves round to the left.
It's interesting that the straight stretch between the station and the
start of the curve looks shorter than between the end of the curve and the
portal, even though the portal is in line with the satellite.
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/41108679764/in/album-72157668434
701408/lightbox/>
It's difficult to see the distance, and is it really further from the
portal to the start of the bend, as from the station to the portal (as
suggested by some mapping sources)?
I don't know. I've not spotted any clues to the tunnel's location from
aerial shots.
I was hoping your [additional] photo showed how far the tunnel went
underground before curving around to the right.
Well, it does show a longish straight stretch, but you'd have to know the
spacing of the lights to estimate its length.
Roland Perry
2018-05-02 10:14:55 UTC
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<1846348594.546903510.050620.recliner.ng-***@news.eternal-sept
ember.org>, at 21:49:16 on Tue, 1 May 2018, Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
It was the underground route of the shuttle that surprised me: I
hadn't realised it went past and under the cargo terminal.
I'm becoming less and less convinced it does.
I'm going by this map, but I can't verify if the underground section is
Post by Roland Perry
https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/41802404401/in/photostream/lightbox/>
http://youtu.be/yRqbXwmxE4I
At 1:55 the train leaves the existing satellite station and almost
immediately curves round to the left.
It's interesting that the straight stretch between the station and the
start of the curve looks shorter than between the end of the curve and the
portal, even though the portal is in line with the satellite.
Here's a better video, which shows broadly similar (~6 second at full
speed) straight sections either end of the curve.

One of the sources quoted by Wikipedia says the network is 3.2km long,
which if you measure from the depot to the headshunt beyond terminal B
matches exactly, if the apex of the curve is in the very middle of Apron
A (ie halfway between the passenger and freight terminals).

The train also takes exactly 20 seconds to get from the edge of the main
terminal building to the portal, a distance of 235m (thus 12m/sec -
which is 80% of the unit's 34mph top speed) and there simply isn't time
between the portal and the station to go anywhere near the freight
terminal and back.
--
Roland Perry
Recliner
2018-05-02 11:18:14 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
In message
ember.org>, at 21:49:16 on Tue, 1 May 2018, Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
It was the underground route of the shuttle that surprised me: I
hadn't realised it went past and under the cargo terminal.
I'm becoming less and less convinced it does.
I'm going by this map, but I can't verify if the underground section is
Post by Roland Perry
https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/41802404401/in/photostream/lightbox/>
http://youtu.be/yRqbXwmxE4I
At 1:55 the train leaves the existing satellite station and almost
immediately curves round to the left.
It's interesting that the straight stretch between the station and the
start of the curve looks shorter than between the end of the curve and the
portal, even though the portal is in line with the satellite.
Here's a better video, which shows broadly similar (~6 second at full
speed) straight sections either end of the curve.
One of the sources quoted by Wikipedia says the network is 3.2km long,
which if you measure from the depot to the headshunt beyond terminal B
matches exactly, if the apex of the curve is in the very middle of Apron
A (ie halfway between the passenger and freight terminals).
The train also takes exactly 20 seconds to get from the edge of the main
terminal building to the portal, a distance of 235m (thus 12m/sec -
which is 80% of the unit's 34mph top speed) and there simply isn't time
between the portal and the station to go anywhere near the freight
terminal and back.
Yes, thanks, it does look like the map I found places the 180 degree
curve too far to the west.
b***@cylonHQ.com
2018-05-07 12:57:09 UTC
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On Wed, 02 May 2018 12:18:14 +0100
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
The train also takes exactly 20 seconds to get from the edge of the main
terminal building to the portal, a distance of 235m (thus 12m/sec -
which is 80% of the unit's 34mph top speed) and there simply isn't time
between the portal and the station to go anywhere near the freight
terminal and back.
Yes, thanks, it does look like the map I found places the 180 degree
curve too far to the west.
I can't see the point of the system when all the satellite terminals are
within walking distance of the main building. Why didn't they just
install some sky bridges and travellators?
Roland Perry
2018-05-02 11:19:15 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
In message
ember.org>, at 21:49:16 on Tue, 1 May 2018, Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Recliner
It was the underground route of the shuttle that surprised me: I
hadn't realised it went past and under the cargo terminal.
I'm becoming less and less convinced it does.
I'm going by this map, but I can't verify if the underground section is
Post by Roland Perry
https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/41802404401/in/photostream/li
http://youtu.be/yRqbXwmxE4I
At 1:55 the train leaves the existing satellite station and almost
immediately curves round to the left.
It's interesting that the straight stretch between the station and the
start of the curve looks shorter than between the end of the curve and the
portal, even though the portal is in line with the satellite.
Here's a better video, which shows broadly similar (~6 second at full
speed) straight sections either end of the curve.
And now, with the link...


Post by Roland Perry
One of the sources quoted by Wikipedia says the network is 3.2km long,
which if you measure from the depot to the headshunt beyond terminal B
matches exactly, if the apex of the curve is in the very middle of
Apron A (ie halfway between the passenger and freight terminals).
The train also takes exactly 20 seconds to get from the edge of the
main terminal building to the portal, a distance of 235m (thus 12m/sec
- which is 80% of the unit's 34mph top speed) and there simply isn't
time between the portal and the station to go anywhere near the freight
terminal and back.
--
Roland Perry
Theo
2018-05-01 08:07:47 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Stansted is running at well below its runway capacity. If it ever grows to
need more passenger terminal capacity, it will simply need a new, fourth
satellite replacing the current cargo terminal, with a station on the
transit line running directly underneath. There's plenty of room to move
the cargo handling area to the west, or north of the runway.
There's a plan to build a new arrivals terminal, to the northeast of the
current terminal building:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-essex-39507329

That will presumably mean some rejigging of pier walkways, or else another
stop on the transit (it's roughly where the depot is now).

It will presumably also block any attempts to extend the Stansted railway
branch eastwards.

Theo
Roland Perry
2018-05-01 10:36:12 UTC
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Post by Theo
Post by Recliner
Stansted is running at well below its runway capacity. If it ever grows to
need more passenger terminal capacity, it will simply need a new, fourth
satellite replacing the current cargo terminal, with a station on the
transit line running directly underneath. There's plenty of room to move
the cargo handling area to the west, or north of the runway.
There's a plan to build a new arrivals terminal, to the northeast of the
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-essex-39507329
That will presumably mean some rejigging of pier walkways, or else another
stop on the transit (it's roughly where the depot is now).
The new terminal is alongside the tracks from the current terminal to
the depot. In practice they could keep the current arrivals station, and
filter people into the new terminal instead of the old. The full plans
are doubtless online, for anyone interested.
Post by Theo
It will presumably also block any attempts to extend the Stansted railway
branch eastwards.
More than the Radisson already does? And even with the station at such a
low level. Where would the branch extend to, anyway?
--
Roland Perry
David Walters
2018-05-02 10:21:06 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
Post by Theo
Post by Recliner
Stansted is running at well below its runway capacity. If it ever grows to
need more passenger terminal capacity, it will simply need a new, fourth
satellite replacing the current cargo terminal, with a station on the
transit line running directly underneath. There's plenty of room to move
the cargo handling area to the west, or north of the runway.
There's a plan to build a new arrivals terminal, to the northeast of the
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-essex-39507329
That will presumably mean some rejigging of pier walkways, or else another
stop on the transit (it's roughly where the depot is now).
The new terminal is alongside the tracks from the current terminal to
the depot. In practice they could keep the current arrivals station, and
filter people into the new terminal instead of the old. The full plans
are doubtless online, for anyone interested.
That seems to be what they are doing. Passengers appear to walk from the
existing terminal into the new arrivals terminal. It's UTT/16/3566/FUL at
http://publicaccess.uttlesford.gov.uk/online-applications/search.do?action=simple&searchType=Application
but links to the documents directly don't work. There is no new station
on the TTS.
Roland Perry
2018-05-02 11:17:03 UTC
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Post by David Walters
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Theo
There's a plan to build a new arrivals terminal, to the northeast of the
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-essex-39507329
That will presumably mean some rejigging of pier walkways, or else another
stop on the transit (it's roughly where the depot is now).
The new terminal is alongside the tracks from the current terminal to
the depot. In practice they could keep the current arrivals station, and
filter people into the new terminal instead of the old. The full plans
are doubtless online, for anyone interested.
That seems to be what they are doing. Passengers appear to walk from the
existing terminal into the new arrivals terminal.
Thanks for finding that.
Post by David Walters
It's UTT/16/3566/FUL at
http://publicaccess.uttlesford.gov.uk/online-applications/search.do?action=simple&searchType=Application
but links to the documents directly don't work.
The infamous idox (a crap[tm] solution) temporary links.
Post by David Walters
There is no new station on the TTS.
Indeed, and of course no new shortcut walking route from the Ryanair
terminal.

"International flight passengers will arrive at the new building via
walkways or the transit train from the air-side satellite buildings at
the existing terminal's concourse level and walk through to the
immigration level in the new arrivals building. Passengers will then
drop down a level to baggage reclaim and to clear customs before
passing through the meeting area and out through the front of the
building."

And have a longer walk to the trains, no doubt.

For reference: "Grow rail mode share from 22% [in 2015] to 25% by the
end of 2019 and secure an enhanced timetable of services" - I wonder how
they propose to do that, given that with the introduction of a 1tph
additional service from the north, the single-alternate-working rail
tunnel is now at capacity.
--
Roland Perry
Recliner
2018-05-01 14:02:01 UTC
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On 01 May 2018 09:07:47 +0100 (BST), Theo
Post by Theo
Post by Recliner
Stansted is running at well below its runway capacity. If it ever grows to
need more passenger terminal capacity, it will simply need a new, fourth
satellite replacing the current cargo terminal, with a station on the
transit line running directly underneath. There's plenty of room to move
the cargo handling area to the west, or north of the runway.
There's a plan to build a new arrivals terminal, to the northeast of the
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-essex-39507329
The article says, "Stansted will be the only airport in the UK
operating dedicated arrivals and departures terminals". That's only
half-true, as LHR T3 has long done exactly that.
Post by Theo
That will presumably mean some rejigging of pier walkways, or else another
stop on the transit (it's roughly where the depot is now).
Wouldn't they just move the arrival stop on the transit to the
northwest to be in front of the new building, where the depot is now,
and move the depot further to the northwest?

The larger terminal buildings could handle more flights, possibly
making it worth adding another passenger satellite where the freight
terminal is now (and creating a new freight terminal somewhere else).
That could increase gates and capacity by a third, without having to
extend the transit line; all that would be needed would be a new
station where the line already passes under the location of the new
satellite.

It would also be possible for the new fourth satellite to be aimed at
full-service airlines, with proper air bridges, business class
lounges, etc, leaving the existing three satellites purely for lo-cos.
Roland Perry
2018-05-01 14:44:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Recliner
On 01 May 2018 09:07:47 +0100 (BST), Theo
Post by Theo
Post by Recliner
Stansted is running at well below its runway capacity. If it ever grows to
need more passenger terminal capacity, it will simply need a new, fourth
satellite replacing the current cargo terminal, with a station on the
transit line running directly underneath. There's plenty of room to move
the cargo handling area to the west, or north of the runway.
There's a plan to build a new arrivals terminal, to the northeast of the
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-essex-39507329
The article says, "Stansted will be the only airport in the UK
operating dedicated arrivals and departures terminals".
A glaring hostage to fortune, in any event.
Post by Recliner
That's only
half-true, as LHR T3 has long done exactly that.
T3 and, erm, T3? Many airports have segregated terminals, East Midlands
on a small scale, for example.

I'm struggling to find a floorpan, but arrivals is entirely separate.

Passport control is in a newer shed grafted on the eastern end: you can
see it here, from the apron bus-laybys, angling southeast into the
building with four rows of skylights; then another short covered way
into the baggage reclaim area with the darker grey roof, no customs
other than a phone on the wall, and an exit into a lobby/meet-and-greet
area completely separating it from the remainder of the main
[departures] building.

https://goo.gl/maps/SEm14rbGm8m
Post by Recliner
Post by Theo
That will presumably mean some rejigging of pier walkways, or else another
stop on the transit (it's roughly where the depot is now).
Wouldn't they just move the arrival stop on the transit to the
northwest to be in front of the new building, where the depot is now,
and move the depot further to the northwest?
What's the need, the arrivals building is quite narrow (has to fit
between the existing terminal and the Radission). Arrivals platform is
already in the far corner of the existing building.

<http://www.stansted-airport-information.com/Images/stansted-airport-
terminal-map.gif>
Post by Recliner
the new fourth satellite to be aimed at
full-service airlines, with proper air bridges, business class
lounges, etc,
The two older satellites have air bridges, the airlines mainly just
choose not to use them, and the lounge area on the top floor is
perfectly capable of hosting a business class offering.

One of the numerous "now you see it now you don't" airlines was a
business class only shuttle to the USA.
Post by Recliner
leaving the existing three satellites purely for lo-cos.
--
Roland Perry
k***@gmail.com
2018-05-07 18:58:39 UTC
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