Discussion:
Things Named After The Current Queen
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Offramp
2017-04-30 16:48:12 UTC
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I do not know much about the present Queen. I know she was born in Mayfair because I have seen the building. I was wondering how many things in England have been named after that woman, and I was surprised at how many it was. Is it general obsequiousness that causes this? They do the same thing in North Korea.

England: Queen Elizabeth Country Park
England: Queen Elizabeth II Jubilee Country Park, Ashington, Northumberland
England: Queen's Gardens, Croydon
England: Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, East London
England: Elizabeth Tower, Palace of Westminster, London (formerly the Clock Tower housing Big Ben)
England: The Queen's Terminal, London Heathrow (also known as Terminal 2)
England: Queen's Theatre, Hornchurch, London
England: Queen Elizabeth II Law Courts, Liverpool
England: Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre, London
England: Queen Elizabeth II Great Court, London
England: Queen Elizabeth Hall, London
England: Queen's Gallery, Buckingham Palace, London
England: QEII Pier, London
England: Queen Elizabeth II Dock, Eastham, Merseyside
England: Queen Elizabeth II Reservoir, Molesey, Surrey
England: Queen Elizabeth II Hall, Oldham
England: Elizabeth Gate, the main entrance into Kew Gardens, London (formerly the Main Gate)
England: The Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Leisure Centre, Leicester
England: The Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Pavilion café, Queens Park, Bolton
England: Princess Elizabeth Orthopaedic Centre, Exeter
England: Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham
England: Queen Elizabeth Hospital, King's Lynn
England: Queen Elizabeth II Hospital, Welwyn Garden City
England: Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham
England: Statue in the Garter Robes, Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury
England: Equestrian statue, Windsor Great Park, Windsor
England: Statue of Queen Elizabeth II in the Garter Robes, Runnymede, Surrey, to mark the 800th anniversary of the sealing of the Magna Carta
England: Golden Jubilee Bridge, London
England: Princess Elizabeth Way, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire
England: Queen Elizabeth II Bridge, A282 road, between Thurrock and Dartford
England: Queen Elizabeth Road, Nuneaton, main boundary road for Camp Hill adjoining to Tuttle Hill and Bucks Hill
England: Queen Elizabeth Bridge, A322 Windsor By-pass, Windsor
England: Queen Elizabeth II Metro Bridge, Tyne and Wear Metro, between Newcastle upon Tyne and Gateshead
England: Queensway, Birmingham
England: Queensway, Stevenage
England: Elizabeth Way, Hilperton, Wiltshire
England: Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford, Oxfordshire
England: Queen Elizabeth College, University of London, London
England: Queen Elizabeth II Silver Jubilee School, West Sussex
England: The Queen's Church of England Primary School, Kew, Surrey

And finally:
England: Coronation Capsule, one of the capsules on the London Eye, London
England: London Underground's Jubilee line
England: Crossrail's Elizabeth line.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_things_named_after_Queen_Elizabeth_II
r***@ntlworld.com
2017-04-30 19:27:58 UTC
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Post by Offramp
I do not know much about the present Queen. I know she was born in Mayfair because I have seen the building. I was wondering how many things in England have been named after that woman, and I was surprised at how many it was. Is it general obsequiousness that causes this? They do the same thing in North Korea.
England: Queen Elizabeth Country Park
England: Queen Elizabeth II Jubilee Country Park, Ashington, Northumberland
England: Queen's Gardens, Croydon
England: Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, East London
England: Elizabeth Tower, Palace of Westminster, London (formerly the Clock Tower housing Big Ben)
England: The Queen's Terminal, London Heathrow (also known as Terminal 2)
England: Queen's Theatre, Hornchurch, London
England: Queen Elizabeth II Law Courts, Liverpool
England: Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre, London
England: Queen Elizabeth II Great Court, London
England: Queen Elizabeth Hall, London
England: Queen's Gallery, Buckingham Palace, London
England: QEII Pier, London
England: Queen Elizabeth II Dock, Eastham, Merseyside
England: Queen Elizabeth II Reservoir, Molesey, Surrey
England: Queen Elizabeth II Hall, Oldham
England: Elizabeth Gate, the main entrance into Kew Gardens, London (formerly the Main Gate)
England: The Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Leisure Centre, Leicester
England: The Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Pavilion café, Queens Park, Bolton
England: Princess Elizabeth Orthopaedic Centre, Exeter
England: Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham
England: Queen Elizabeth Hospital, King's Lynn
England: Queen Elizabeth II Hospital, Welwyn Garden City
England: Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham
England: Statue in the Garter Robes, Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury
England: Equestrian statue, Windsor Great Park, Windsor
England: Statue of Queen Elizabeth II in the Garter Robes, Runnymede, Surrey, to mark the 800th anniversary of the sealing of the Magna Carta
England: Golden Jubilee Bridge, London
England: Princess Elizabeth Way, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire
England: Queen Elizabeth II Bridge, A282 road, between Thurrock and Dartford
England: Queen Elizabeth Road, Nuneaton, main boundary road for Camp Hill adjoining to Tuttle Hill and Bucks Hill
England: Queen Elizabeth Bridge, A322 Windsor By-pass, Windsor
England: Queen Elizabeth II Metro Bridge, Tyne and Wear Metro, between Newcastle upon Tyne and Gateshead
England: Queensway, Birmingham
England: Queensway, Stevenage
England: Elizabeth Way, Hilperton, Wiltshire
England: Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford, Oxfordshire
England: Queen Elizabeth College, University of London, London
England: Queen Elizabeth II Silver Jubilee School, West Sussex
England: The Queen's Church of England Primary School, Kew, Surrey
England: Coronation Capsule, one of the capsules on the London Eye, London
England: London Underground's Jubilee line
England: Crossrail's Elizabeth line.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_things_named_after_Queen_Elizabeth_II
I have no objection to naming things after the Queen, but I still
wish that Crossrail had not been renamed.
Roland Perry
2017-04-30 19:39:50 UTC
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Post by Offramp
England: Queen Elizabeth Hospital, King's Lynn
That's named after her mother.

To even the score, there's Elizabeth Way (an early 1970's inner ring
road) in Cambridge, named after her.
--
Roland Perry
Recliner
2017-04-30 19:47:20 UTC
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Post by Offramp
I do not know much about the present Queen. I know she was born in
Mayfair because I have seen the building. I was wondering how many things
in England have been named after that woman, and I was surprised at how
many it was. Is it general obsequiousness that causes this? They do the
same thing in North Korea.
England: Queen Elizabeth Country Park
England: Queen Elizabeth II Jubilee Country Park, Ashington, Northumberland
England: Queen's Gardens, Croydon
England: Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, East London
England: Elizabeth Tower, Palace of Westminster, London (formerly the
Clock Tower housing Big Ben)
England: The Queen's Terminal, London Heathrow (also known as Terminal 2)
England: Queen's Theatre, Hornchurch, London
England: Queen Elizabeth II Law Courts, Liverpool
England: Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre, London
England: Queen Elizabeth II Great Court, London
England: Queen Elizabeth Hall, London
England: Queen's Gallery, Buckingham Palace, London
England: QEII Pier, London
England: Queen Elizabeth II Dock, Eastham, Merseyside
England: Queen Elizabeth II Reservoir, Molesey, Surrey
England: Queen Elizabeth II Hall, Oldham
England: Elizabeth Gate, the main entrance into Kew Gardens, London
(formerly the Main Gate)
England: The Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Leisure Centre, Leicester
England: The Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Pavilion café, Queens Park, Bolton
England: Princess Elizabeth Orthopaedic Centre, Exeter
England: Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham
England: Queen Elizabeth Hospital, King's Lynn
England: Queen Elizabeth II Hospital, Welwyn Garden City
England: Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham
England: Statue in the Garter Robes, Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury
England: Equestrian statue, Windsor Great Park, Windsor
England: Statue of Queen Elizabeth II in the Garter Robes, Runnymede,
Surrey, to mark the 800th anniversary of the sealing of the Magna Carta
England: Golden Jubilee Bridge, London
England: Princess Elizabeth Way, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire
England: Queen Elizabeth II Bridge, A282 road, between Thurrock and Dartford
England: Queen Elizabeth Road, Nuneaton, main boundary road for Camp
Hill adjoining to Tuttle Hill and Bucks Hill
England: Queen Elizabeth Bridge, A322 Windsor By-pass, Windsor
England: Queen Elizabeth II Metro Bridge, Tyne and Wear Metro, between
Newcastle upon Tyne and Gateshead
England: Queensway, Birmingham
England: Queensway, Stevenage
England: Elizabeth Way, Hilperton, Wiltshire
England: Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford, Oxfordshire
England: Queen Elizabeth College, University of London, London
England: Queen Elizabeth II Silver Jubilee School, West Sussex
England: The Queen's Church of England Primary School, Kew, Surrey
England: Coronation Capsule, one of the capsules on the London Eye, London
England: London Underground's Jubilee line
England: Crossrail's Elizabeth line.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_things_named_after_Queen_Elizabeth_II
I dare say some of those without an explicit II may have been named after
previous Queen Elizabeths. In any case, she's been monarch for well over 60
years, and a lot of stuff has been built in thst time.

And, is the new HMS Queen Elizabeth aircraft carrier not on the list?
James Heaton
2017-04-30 20:00:35 UTC
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Post by Offramp
I do not know much about the present Queen. I know she was born in Mayfair
because I have seen the building. I was wondering how many things in
England have been named after that woman, and I was surprised at how many
it was. Is it general obsequiousness that causes this? They do the same
thing in North Korea.
England: Queen Elizabeth Hospital, King's Lynn
No that one's named after her mother

However the Queen's building at the University of East Anglia is named after
Elizabeth II, she opened it in the 90s (before 96 as that's when I started
there)

James
michael adams
2017-04-30 23:25:09 UTC
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Post by Offramp
England: Queen's Gallery, Buckingham Palace, London
Which presumably will become the King's (or President's) Gallery, at some point in
the future.

Just as around 1700 Queen's Counsel will become King's Counsel,
at around the same time.


michael adams

...
Nobody
2017-05-01 00:30:22 UTC
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On Mon, 1 May 2017 00:25:09 +0100, "michael adams"
Post by michael adams
Post by Offramp
England: Queen's Gallery, Buckingham Palace, London
Which presumably will become the King's (or President's) Gallery, at some point in
the future.
Just as around 1700 Queen's Counsel will become King's Counsel,
at around the same time.
michael adams
And just as well email has killed snailmail... all those pillarboxes.
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-05-01 07:10:31 UTC
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Post by Nobody
On Mon, 1 May 2017 00:25:09 +0100, "michael adams"
Post by michael adams
Post by Offramp
England: Queen's Gallery, Buckingham Palace, London
Which presumably will become the King's (or President's) Gallery, at
some point in the future.
Just as around 1700 Queen's Counsel will become King's Counsel,
at around the same time.
And just as well email has killed snailmail... all those pillarboxes.
There are still lots with "VR" on them!
--
Colin Rosenstiel
d***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-05-01 10:08:45 UTC
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Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Nobody
Post by michael adams
Just as around 1700 Queen's Counsel will become King's Counsel,
at around the same time.
And just as well email has killed snailmail... all those pillarboxes.
There are still lots with "VR" on them!
This one is reckoned to be the oldest in use,About 30 minutes drive
from here.
http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/513653
I find it quite refreshing in a way that it is almost buried in a
Dorset hedge rather than in some prettyfied tourist area of one of the
UK's Capitals or tourist towns such as Bath or York amongst the black
and gold painted litter bins.

G.Harman
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-05-01 21:18:08 UTC
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Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Nobody
Post by michael adams
Just as around 1700 Queen's Counsel will become King's Counsel,
at around the same time.
And just as well email has killed snailmail... all those pillarboxes.
There are still lots with "VR" on them!
This one is reckoned to be the oldest in use,About 30 minutes drive
from here.
http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/513653
I find it quite refreshing in a way that it is almost buried in a
Dorset hedge rather than in some prettyfied tourist area of one of the
UK's Capitals or tourist towns such as Bath or York amongst the black
and gold painted litter bins.
I was surprised when on a visit to St Ives, Cornwall, for a week recently to
find they don't really believe in street letter boxes. All those around were
linked to post offices.

I actually asked where there might be one near the bus station, across from
where we were staying, and was told that only post offices had them. In one
case that was by the previous site of one that has moved.
--
Colin Rosenstiel
Roland Perry
2017-05-02 08:09:16 UTC
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Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
This one is reckoned to be the oldest in use,About 30 minutes drive
from here.
http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/513653
I find it quite refreshing in a way that it is almost buried in a
Dorset hedge rather than in some prettyfied tourist area of one of the
UK's Capitals or tourist towns such as Bath or York amongst the black
and gold painted litter bins.
I was surprised when on a visit to St Ives, Cornwall, for a week recently to
find they don't really believe in street letter boxes. All those around were
linked to post offices.
I actually asked where there might be one near the bus station, across from
where we were staying, and was told that only post offices had them. In one
case that was by the previous site of one that has moved.
Yes, it's often possible in smaller tons to see where the Post Office
used to be, on account of having (often a two-slot) pillar box on the
street outside. Outside what's now a charity/mobilephone/sandwich/...
shop.
--
Roland Perry
Recliner
2017-05-02 12:22:45 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
This one is reckoned to be the oldest in use,About 30 minutes drive
from here.
http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/513653
I find it quite refreshing in a way that it is almost buried in a
Dorset hedge rather than in some prettyfied tourist area of one of the
UK's Capitals or tourist towns such as Bath or York amongst the black
and gold painted litter bins.
I was surprised when on a visit to St Ives, Cornwall, for a week recently to
find they don't really believe in street letter boxes. All those around were
linked to post offices.
I actually asked where there might be one near the bus station, across from
where we were staying, and was told that only post offices had them. In one
case that was by the previous site of one that has moved.
Yes, it's often possible in smaller tons to see where the Post Office
used to be, on account of having (often a two-slot) pillar box on the
street outside. Outside what's now a charity/mobilephone/sandwich/...
shop.
True, and not just in smaller towns. In my London suburb, the post
office used to be a double-sized shop; there still is one, but it's
now just a counter in a convenience store a few shops along. The
double-slot post box hasn't moved, and it's now outside the Polish
food shop that occupies the old post office site.
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-05-02 17:40:49 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
from here.
http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/513653
I find it quite refreshing in a way that it is almost buried in a
Dorset hedge rather than in some prettyfied tourist area of one of the
UK's Capitals or tourist towns such as Bath or York amongst the black
and gold painted litter bins.
I was surprised when on a visit to St Ives, Cornwall, for a week
recently to find they don't really believe in street letter boxes. All
those around were linked to post offices.
I actually asked where there might be one near the bus station, across
from where we were staying, and was told that only post offices had
them. In one case that was by the previous site of one that has moved.
Yes, it's often possible in smaller tons to see where the Post Office
used to be, on account of having (often a two-slot) pillar box on the
street outside. Outside what's now a charity/mobilephone/sandwich/...
shop.
True, and not just in smaller towns. In my London suburb, the post
office used to be a double-sized shop; there still is one, but it's
now just a counter in a convenience store a few shops along. The
double-slot post box hasn't moved, and it's now outside the Polish
food shop that occupies the old post office site.
London suburbs are just the size of places that lost their Crown Post
Offices years ago. The Putney one was rebuilt while I was growing up but is
now a shop with only sub-post offices serving the place. But there still are
pillar boxes all round the area, unrelated to current or former post offices.
--
Colin Rosenstiel
Tony Dragon
2017-05-02 22:44:08 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
This one is reckoned to be the oldest in use,About 30 minutes drive
from here.
http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/513653
I find it quite refreshing in a way that it is almost buried in a
Dorset hedge rather than in some prettyfied tourist area of one of the
UK's Capitals or tourist towns such as Bath or York amongst the black
and gold painted litter bins.
I was surprised when on a visit to St Ives, Cornwall, for a week recently to
find they don't really believe in street letter boxes. All those around were
linked to post offices.
I actually asked where there might be one near the bus station, across from
where we were staying, and was told that only post offices had them. In one
case that was by the previous site of one that has moved.
Yes, it's often possible in smaller tons to see where the Post Office
used to be, on account of having (often a two-slot) pillar box on the
street outside. Outside what's now a charity/mobilephone/sandwich/...
shop.
True, and not just in smaller towns. In my London suburb, the post
office used to be a double-sized shop; there still is one, but it's
now just a counter in a convenience store a few shops along. The
double-slot post box hasn't moved, and it's now outside the Polish
food shop that occupies the old post office site.
Our local PO is now the HQ of Radio Jackie.
Roland Perry
2017-05-02 08:14:58 UTC
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Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Nobody
And just as well email has killed snailmail... all those pillarboxes.
There are still lots with "VR" on them!
This one is reckoned to be the oldest in use,About 30 minutes drive
from here.
http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/513653
I find it quite refreshing in a way that it is almost buried in a
Dorset hedge
No longer: <http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2014/04/01/article-2594153-1C
BC852C00000578-883_634x463.jpg>
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
rather than in some prettyfied tourist area of one of the
UK's Capitals or tourist towns such as Bath or York amongst the black
and gold painted litter bins.
--
Roland Perry
d***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-05-02 21:59:40 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
This one is reckoned to be the oldest in use,About 30 minutes drive
from here.
http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/513653
I find it quite refreshing in a way that it is almost buried in a
Dorset hedge
No longer: <http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2014/04/01/article-2594153-1C
BC852C00000578-883_634x463.jpg>
Phew , I half expected to open that and find that it had been
demolished by an errant road sweeper or worse been uprooted and swiped
for some town or city's twee improved pedestrian area with newly laid
cobbles and reproduction Edwardian lampposts till I noticed the 2014
date. I posted a letter in it on Jan 1st this year and the paint has
dulled and the undergrowth growing again, looks much like it did when
google went past in 2011,
https://goo.gl/maps/yssqahH4oQ52


G.Harman
Basil Jet
2017-05-02 23:25:14 UTC
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Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
Phew , I half expected to open that and find that it had been
demolished by an errant road sweeper or worse been uprooted and swiped
for some town or city's twee improved pedestrian area with newly laid
cobbles and reproduction Edwardian lampposts till I noticed the 2014
date.
Either a thing looks nice or it doesn't. Why was it okay for Edwardians
to make things that looked nice but it's not okay for us? The people who
make beauty in the age of ugliness deserve praise, not criticism.
Recliner
2017-05-02 23:48:20 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
Phew , I half expected to open that and find that it had been
demolished by an errant road sweeper or worse been uprooted and swiped
for some town or city's twee improved pedestrian area with newly laid
cobbles and reproduction Edwardian lampposts till I noticed the 2014
date.
Either a thing looks nice or it doesn't. Why was it okay for Edwardians
to make things that looked nice but it's not okay for us? The people who
make beauty in the age of ugliness deserve praise, not criticism.
They do, but producing pastiche Edwardian stuff is worthy of much less
praise than producing good original designs. Modern stuff often is, but
need not be, ugly.
s***@potato.field
2017-05-03 08:27:15 UTC
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On Tue, 2 May 2017 23:48:20 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Recliner
Post by Basil Jet
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
Phew , I half expected to open that and find that it had been
demolished by an errant road sweeper or worse been uprooted and swiped
for some town or city's twee improved pedestrian area with newly laid
cobbles and reproduction Edwardian lampposts till I noticed the 2014
date.
Either a thing looks nice or it doesn't. Why was it okay for Edwardians
to make things that looked nice but it's not okay for us? The people who
make beauty in the age of ugliness deserve praise, not criticism.
They do, but producing pastiche Edwardian stuff is worthy of much less
praise than producing good original designs. Modern stuff often is, but
need not be, ugly.
Depends. Modern buildings are IMO range from the uninspired to the pig ugly.
Even the shard doesn't really do it for me - a 3 year old can draw a giant
glass pyramid, where is the inspiration and fine detail? And as for the
identikit office blocks, rabbit hutch houses and industrial estates the less
said the better. OTOH cars are looking pretty good these days, its hard to find
a really ugly one anymore, and tech stuff also looks pretty smart to me.
--
Spud
Roland Perry
2017-05-03 09:13:06 UTC
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Post by s***@potato.field
OTOH cars are looking pretty good these days, its hard to find
a really ugly one anymore
Plenty of them are really ugly. The Nissan Joke, for example.
--
Roland Perry
s***@potato.field
2017-05-03 09:24:30 UTC
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On Wed, 3 May 2017 10:13:06 +0100
Post by Roland Perry
Post by s***@potato.field
OTOH cars are looking pretty good these days, its hard to find
a really ugly one anymore
Plenty of them are really ugly. The Nissan Joke, for example.
Well alright, I didn't say there weren't any. But everyday car design (obviously
not ferraris etc) went down the toilet from the mid 70s to about the late 90s
but in the last 15 or so years its improved immensely IMO.
--
Spud
d***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-05-03 09:04:38 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
Phew , I half expected to open that and find that it had been
demolished by an errant road sweeper or worse been uprooted and swiped
for some town or city's twee improved pedestrian area with newly laid
cobbles and reproduction Edwardian lampposts till I noticed the 2014
date.
Either a thing looks nice or it doesn't. Why was it okay for Edwardians
to make things that looked nice but it's not okay for us? The people who
make beauty in the age of ugliness deserve praise, not criticism.
Was there an age of beauty? Every era has a proportion of both
pleasant and nasty ambiences.
We often forget the latter, Terminal stations were fairly unpleasant
places with the fug of numerous steam and later diesel locos exhaust
filling the air but a single celebrity steamer into such a station now
brings out nostalgia most of which is now inherited memories rather
than first hand experience.
Agree things should look nice but just loosely copying Edwardian
street furniture sometimes looks a bit contrived, it needs the area
covered in Horse muck to be realistic.
There is plenty of good modern design around.

Anyway the Gist of my post was that something genuine and still in its
original location may have been swiped for use elsewhere to add
something authentic amongst all the replicas.

G.Harman
Optimist
2017-05-03 10:15:05 UTC
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Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Basil Jet
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
Phew , I half expected to open that and find that it had been
demolished by an errant road sweeper or worse been uprooted and swiped
for some town or city's twee improved pedestrian area with newly laid
cobbles and reproduction Edwardian lampposts till I noticed the 2014
date.
Either a thing looks nice or it doesn't. Why was it okay for Edwardians
to make things that looked nice but it's not okay for us? The people who
make beauty in the age of ugliness deserve praise, not criticism.
Was there an age of beauty? Every era has a proportion of both
pleasant and nasty ambiences.
We often forget the latter, Terminal stations were fairly unpleasant
places with the fug of numerous steam and later diesel locos exhaust
filling the air but a single celebrity steamer into such a station now
brings out nostalgia most of which is now inherited memories rather
than first hand experience.
Agree things should look nice but just loosely copying Edwardian
street furniture sometimes looks a bit contrived, it needs the area
covered in Horse muck to be realistic.
There is plenty of good modern design around.
Anyway the Gist of my post was that something genuine and still in its
original location may have been swiped for use elsewhere to add
something authentic amongst all the replicas.
G.Harman
You might enjoy this


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e27002 aurora
2017-05-03 17:31:44 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
Phew , I half expected to open that and find that it had been
demolished by an errant road sweeper or worse been uprooted and swiped
for some town or city's twee improved pedestrian area with newly laid
cobbles and reproduction Edwardian lampposts till I noticed the 2014
date.
Either a thing looks nice or it doesn't. Why was it okay for Edwardians
to make things that looked nice but it's not okay for us? The people who
make beauty in the age of ugliness deserve praise, not criticism.
We agree on this. Not everything the Edwardians built was beautiful.
Not everything thing built since the 1960s is ugly. But, the balance
is sure in favor of the Edwardians.
Recliner
2017-05-06 23:20:35 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
Phew , I half expected to open that and find that it had been
demolished by an errant road sweeper or worse been uprooted and swiped
for some town or city's twee improved pedestrian area with newly laid
cobbles and reproduction Edwardian lampposts till I noticed the 2014
date.
Either a thing looks nice or it doesn't. Why was it okay for Edwardians
to make things that looked nice but it's not okay for us? The people who
make beauty in the age of ugliness deserve praise, not criticism.
Fashions change, of course. For example, the late Victorian Tower Bridge is
now highly regarded as one of London's icons, but was much criticised when
built. Less well known is that the key engineer who worked on it was
Brunel. No, not I K Brunel, but his son, Henry Marc Brunel.
s***@potato.field
2017-05-07 16:44:31 UTC
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On Sat, 6 May 2017 23:20:35 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Recliner
Post by Basil Jet
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
Phew , I half expected to open that and find that it had been
demolished by an errant road sweeper or worse been uprooted and swiped
for some town or city's twee improved pedestrian area with newly laid
cobbles and reproduction Edwardian lampposts till I noticed the 2014
date.
Either a thing looks nice or it doesn't. Why was it okay for Edwardians
to make things that looked nice but it's not okay for us? The people who
make beauty in the age of ugliness deserve praise, not criticism.
Fashions change, of course. For example, the late Victorian Tower Bridge is
now highly regarded as one of London's icons, but was much criticised when
built. Less well known is that the key engineer who worked on it was
Brunel. No, not I K Brunel, but his son, Henry Marc Brunel.
The Eiffel Tower was widely seen as hideous when it was built but now its
the de facto symbol of France. However I'm probably in the tiny minority who
think its detractors were right - it is butt ugly and looks like an
electricity pylon on steroids IMO.
--
Spud
d***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-05-07 23:33:07 UTC
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Post by s***@potato.field
Post by Recliner
Fashions change, of course. For example, the late Victorian Tower Bridge is
now highly regarded as one of London's icons, but was much criticised when
built.
The Eiffel Tower was widely seen as hideous when it was built but now its
the de facto symbol of France. However I'm probably in the tiny minority who
think its detractors were right - it is butt ugly and looks like an
electricity pylon on steroids IMO.
You'll be glad the English one was stillborn then.
Loading Image...

G.Harman
s***@potato.field
2017-05-08 08:20:15 UTC
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On Mon, 08 May 2017 00:33:07 +0100
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by s***@potato.field
Post by Recliner
Fashions change, of course. For example, the late Victorian Tower Bridge is
now highly regarded as one of London's icons, but was much criticised when
built.
The Eiffel Tower was widely seen as hideous when it was built but now its
the de facto symbol of France. However I'm probably in the tiny minority who
think its detractors were right - it is butt ugly and looks like an
electricity pylon on steroids IMO.
You'll be glad the English one was stillborn then.
http://spiritofmirko.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/watkinstower_1900.jpg
I presume there would have been more to it than that? Unless thats all they
could afford!
--
Spud
Recliner
2017-05-08 08:26:17 UTC
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Post by s***@potato.field
On Mon, 08 May 2017 00:33:07 +0100
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by s***@potato.field
Post by Recliner
Fashions change, of course. For example, the late Victorian Tower Bridge is
now highly regarded as one of London's icons, but was much criticised when
built.
The Eiffel Tower was widely seen as hideous when it was built but now its
the de facto symbol of France. However I'm probably in the tiny minority who
think its detractors were right - it is butt ugly and looks like an
electricity pylon on steroids IMO.
You'll be glad the English one was stillborn then.
http://spiritofmirko.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/watkinstower_1900.jpg
I presume there would have been more to it than that? Unless thats all they
could afford!
That's when the money ran out. It had been intended to be 150' taller than
the French original. All part of Watkin's Metroland vision. Wembley
Stadium's Twin Towers were later built on top of the old tower's
foundations.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watkin%27s_Tower
Nobody
2017-05-09 00:23:30 UTC
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On Mon, 8 May 2017 08:26:17 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by s***@potato.field
On Mon, 08 May 2017 00:33:07 +0100
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by s***@potato.field
Post by Recliner
Fashions change, of course. For example, the late Victorian Tower Bridge is
now highly regarded as one of London's icons, but was much criticised when
built.
The Eiffel Tower was widely seen as hideous when it was built but now its
the de facto symbol of France. However I'm probably in the tiny minority who
think its detractors were right - it is butt ugly and looks like an
electricity pylon on steroids IMO.
You'll be glad the English one was stillborn then.
http://spiritofmirko.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/watkinstower_1900.jpg
I presume there would have been more to it than that? Unless thats all they
could afford!
That's when the money ran out. It had been intended to be 150' taller than
the French original.
Oh. And here's me thinking... another coal-miners' attack of English
Disease likely shut down the steel industry.
e27002 aurora
2017-05-08 08:30:37 UTC
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Post by s***@potato.field
On Mon, 08 May 2017 00:33:07 +0100
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by s***@potato.field
Post by Recliner
Fashions change, of course. For example, the late Victorian Tower Bridge is
now highly regarded as one of London's icons, but was much criticised when
built.
The Eiffel Tower was widely seen as hideous when it was built but now its
the de facto symbol of France. However I'm probably in the tiny minority who
think its detractors were right - it is butt ugly and looks like an
electricity pylon on steroids IMO.
You'll be glad the English one was stillborn then.
http://spiritofmirko.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/watkinstower_1900.jpg
I presume there would have been more to it than that? Unless thats all they
could afford!
The "Metropolitan Tower" was a project of Sir Edward Watkin of the
Metropolitan Railway, Great Central Railway, and the Southeastern
Railway.

It did indeed run out of money after reaching the first stage as
illustrated. There was also a question of the stability of the ground
under one of its legs.

After demolition, the site was used for the "British Empire
Exhibition".

Today, I believe, there is a soccer pitch on the site. :-)
Optimist
2017-05-08 08:37:50 UTC
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Post by e27002 aurora
Post by s***@potato.field
On Mon, 08 May 2017 00:33:07 +0100
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by s***@potato.field
Post by Recliner
Fashions change, of course. For example, the late Victorian Tower Bridge is
now highly regarded as one of London's icons, but was much criticised when
built.
The Eiffel Tower was widely seen as hideous when it was built but now its
the de facto symbol of France. However I'm probably in the tiny minority who
think its detractors were right - it is butt ugly and looks like an
electricity pylon on steroids IMO.
You'll be glad the English one was stillborn then.
http://spiritofmirko.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/watkinstower_1900.jpg
I presume there would have been more to it than that? Unless thats all they
could afford!
The "Metropolitan Tower" was a project of Sir Edward Watkin of the
Metropolitan Railway, Great Central Railway, and the Southeastern
Railway.
It did indeed run out of money after reaching the first stage as
illustrated. There was also a question of the stability of the ground
under one of its legs.
After demolition, the site was used for the "British Empire
Exhibition".
Today, I believe, there is a soccer pitch on the site. :-)
Wasn't the "Neverstop Railway" one of the great attractions at the Exhibition?

---
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http://www.avg.com
e27002 aurora
2017-05-08 08:44:07 UTC
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On Mon, 08 May 2017 09:37:50 +0100, Optimist
Post by Optimist
Post by e27002 aurora
Post by s***@potato.field
On Mon, 08 May 2017 00:33:07 +0100
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by s***@potato.field
Post by Recliner
Fashions change, of course. For example, the late Victorian Tower Bridge is
now highly regarded as one of London's icons, but was much criticised when
built.
The Eiffel Tower was widely seen as hideous when it was built but now its
the de facto symbol of France. However I'm probably in the tiny minority who
think its detractors were right - it is butt ugly and looks like an
electricity pylon on steroids IMO.
You'll be glad the English one was stillborn then.
http://spiritofmirko.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/watkinstower_1900.jpg
I presume there would have been more to it than that? Unless thats all they
could afford!
The "Metropolitan Tower" was a project of Sir Edward Watkin of the
Metropolitan Railway, Great Central Railway, and the Southeastern
Railway.
It did indeed run out of money after reaching the first stage as
illustrated. There was also a question of the stability of the ground
under one of its legs.
After demolition, the site was used for the "British Empire
Exhibition".
Today, I believe, there is a soccer pitch on the site. :-)
Wasn't the "Neverstop Railway" one of the great attractions at the Exhibition?
Indeed, it was. Somewhere, I have seen a picture of King George V and
Queen Mary riding on it.
Basil Jet
2017-05-08 13:33:29 UTC
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Post by Optimist
Post by e27002 aurora
Post by s***@potato.field
On Mon, 08 May 2017 00:33:07 +0100
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by s***@potato.field
Post by Recliner
Fashions change, of course. For example, the late Victorian Tower Bridge is
now highly regarded as one of London's icons, but was much criticised when
built.
The Eiffel Tower was widely seen as hideous when it was built but now its
the de facto symbol of France. However I'm probably in the tiny minority who
think its detractors were right - it is butt ugly and looks like an
electricity pylon on steroids IMO.
You'll be glad the English one was stillborn then.
http://spiritofmirko.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/watkinstower_1900.jpg
I presume there would have been more to it than that? Unless thats all they
could afford!
The "Metropolitan Tower" was a project of Sir Edward Watkin of the
Metropolitan Railway, Great Central Railway, and the Southeastern
Railway.
It did indeed run out of money after reaching the first stage as
illustrated. There was also a question of the stability of the ground
under one of its legs.
After demolition, the site was used for the "British Empire
Exhibition".
Today, I believe, there is a soccer pitch on the site. :-)
Wasn't the "Neverstop Railway" one of the great attractions at the Exhibition?

Optimist
2017-05-08 17:16:24 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Basil Jet
Post by Optimist
Post by e27002 aurora
Post by s***@potato.field
On Mon, 08 May 2017 00:33:07 +0100
Post by d***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by s***@potato.field
Post by Recliner
Fashions change, of course. For example, the late Victorian Tower Bridge is
now highly regarded as one of London's icons, but was much criticised when
built.
The Eiffel Tower was widely seen as hideous when it was built but now its
the de facto symbol of France. However I'm probably in the tiny minority who
think its detractors were right - it is butt ugly and looks like an
electricity pylon on steroids IMO.
You'll be glad the English one was stillborn then.
http://spiritofmirko.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/watkinstower_1900.jpg
I presume there would have been more to it than that? Unless thats all they
could afford!
The "Metropolitan Tower" was a project of Sir Edward Watkin of the
Metropolitan Railway, Great Central Railway, and the Southeastern
Railway.
It did indeed run out of money after reaching the first stage as
illustrated. There was also a question of the stability of the ground
under one of its legs.
After demolition, the site was used for the "British Empire
Exhibition".
Today, I believe, there is a soccer pitch on the site. :-)
Wasn't the "Neverstop Railway" one of the great attractions at the Exhibition?
http://youtu.be/EX_MlWL7YKM
HS2 eat your heart out!

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http://www.avg.com
Offramp
2017-05-09 14:04:29 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
Post by Optimist
Wasn't the "Neverstop Railway" one of the great attractions at the Exhibition?
http://youtu.be/EX_MlWL7YKM
I am surprised that the corkscrew effect isn't used more often to transport people small distances, particularly as an escalator in a confined area.
Recliner
2017-05-09 14:23:08 UTC
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Post by Offramp
Post by Basil Jet
Post by Optimist
Wasn't the "Neverstop Railway" one of the great attractions at the Exhibition?
http://youtu.be/EX_MlWL7YKM
I am surprised that the corkscrew effect isn't used more often to
transport people small distances, particularly as an escalator in a confined area.
It looks like a sort of Archimedes Screw, but it's really a worm drive.
It's often used in screw jacks and I think in some low rise elevators as
well.

michael adams
2017-05-02 09:28:19 UTC
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Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Nobody
On Mon, 1 May 2017 00:25:09 +0100, "michael adams"
Post by michael adams
Post by Offramp
England: Queen's Gallery, Buckingham Palace, London
Which presumably will become the King's (or President's) Gallery, at
some point in the future.
Just as around 1700 Queen's Counsel will become King's Counsel,
at around the same time.
And just as well email has killed snailmail... all those pillarboxes.
There are still lots with "VR" on them!
--
Colin Rosenstiel
This should link to a photograph of a pillar box next to a tree
which I took 4 years ago. Although Tinypic has been rubbish
of late. Doubtless this has already appeared on numerous London
Blogs etc. etc.. I'm always meaning to do a follow
up. Any local resident intending to stay around could
have produced a nice animation with a weekly snap.
Maybe somebody has dunno.

http://tinypic.com/r/uri48/9


michael adams

...
Offramp
2017-05-01 07:38:02 UTC
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Post by Nobody
And just as well email has killed snailmail... all those pillarboxes.
I thought snailmail was doing fairly well. I get a lot of post every day, and not just junk, Amazon, Ebay, magazines, statements...
Nobody
2017-05-01 00:31:50 UTC
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On Sun, 30 Apr 2017 09:48:12 -0700 (PDT), Offramp
Post by Offramp
I do not know much about the present Queen. I know she was born in Mayfair because I have seen the building. I was wondering how many things in England have been named after that woman, and I was surprised at how many it was. Is it general obsequiousness that causes this? They do the same thing in North Korea.
England: Queen Elizabeth Country Park
England: Queen Elizabeth II Jubilee Country Park, Ashington, Northumberland
England: Queen's Gardens, Croydon
England: Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, East London
England: Elizabeth Tower, Palace of Westminster, London (formerly the Clock Tower housing Big Ben)
England: The Queen's Terminal, London Heathrow (also known as Terminal 2)
England: Queen's Theatre, Hornchurch, London
England: Queen Elizabeth II Law Courts, Liverpool
England: Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre, London
England: Queen Elizabeth II Great Court, London
England: Queen Elizabeth Hall, London
England: Queen's Gallery, Buckingham Palace, London
England: QEII Pier, London
England: Queen Elizabeth II Dock, Eastham, Merseyside
England: Queen Elizabeth II Reservoir, Molesey, Surrey
England: Queen Elizabeth II Hall, Oldham
England: Elizabeth Gate, the main entrance into Kew Gardens, London (formerly the Main Gate)
England: The Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Leisure Centre, Leicester
England: The Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Pavilion café, Queens Park, Bolton
England: Princess Elizabeth Orthopaedic Centre, Exeter
England: Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham
England: Queen Elizabeth Hospital, King's Lynn
England: Queen Elizabeth II Hospital, Welwyn Garden City
England: Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham
England: Statue in the Garter Robes, Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury
England: Equestrian statue, Windsor Great Park, Windsor
England: Statue of Queen Elizabeth II in the Garter Robes, Runnymede, Surrey, to mark the 800th anniversary of the sealing of the Magna Carta
England: Golden Jubilee Bridge, London
England: Princess Elizabeth Way, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire
England: Queen Elizabeth II Bridge, A282 road, between Thurrock and Dartford
England: Queen Elizabeth Road, Nuneaton, main boundary road for Camp Hill adjoining to Tuttle Hill and Bucks Hill
England: Queen Elizabeth Bridge, A322 Windsor By-pass, Windsor
England: Queen Elizabeth II Metro Bridge, Tyne and Wear Metro, between Newcastle upon Tyne and Gateshead
England: Queensway, Birmingham
England: Queensway, Stevenage
England: Elizabeth Way, Hilperton, Wiltshire
England: Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford, Oxfordshire
England: Queen Elizabeth College, University of London, London
England: Queen Elizabeth II Silver Jubilee School, West Sussex
England: The Queen's Church of England Primary School, Kew, Surrey
England: Coronation Capsule, one of the capsules on the London Eye, London
England: London Underground's Jubilee line
England: Crossrail's Elizabeth line.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_things_named_after_Queen_Elizabeth_II
Are there really so few?
Basil Jet
2017-05-01 06:54:20 UTC
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Post by Offramp
I do not know much about the present Queen. I know she was born in Mayfair because I have seen the building. I was wondering how many things in England have been named after that woman, and I was surprised at how many it was. Is it general obsequiousness that causes this? They do the same thing in North Korea.
England: Queen Elizabeth Country Park
England: Queen Elizabeth II Jubilee Country Park, Ashington, Northumberland
England: Queen's Gardens, Croydon
England: Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, East London
England: Elizabeth Tower, Palace of Westminster, London (formerly the Clock Tower housing Big Ben)
England: The Queen's Terminal, London Heathrow (also known as Terminal 2)
England: Queen's Theatre, Hornchurch, London
England: Queen Elizabeth II Law Courts, Liverpool
England: Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre, London
England: Queen Elizabeth II Great Court, London
England: Queen Elizabeth Hall, London
England: Queen's Gallery, Buckingham Palace, London
England: QEII Pier, London
England: Queen Elizabeth II Dock, Eastham, Merseyside
England: Queen Elizabeth II Reservoir, Molesey, Surrey
England: Queen Elizabeth II Hall, Oldham
England: Elizabeth Gate, the main entrance into Kew Gardens, London (formerly the Main Gate)
England: The Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Leisure Centre, Leicester
England: The Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Pavilion café, Queens Park, Bolton
England: Princess Elizabeth Orthopaedic Centre, Exeter
England: Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham
England: Queen Elizabeth Hospital, King's Lynn
England: Queen Elizabeth II Hospital, Welwyn Garden City
England: Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham
England: Statue in the Garter Robes, Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury
England: Equestrian statue, Windsor Great Park, Windsor
England: Statue of Queen Elizabeth II in the Garter Robes, Runnymede, Surrey, to mark the 800th anniversary of the sealing of the Magna Carta
England: Golden Jubilee Bridge, London
England: Princess Elizabeth Way, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire
England: Queen Elizabeth II Bridge, A282 road, between Thurrock and Dartford
England: Queen Elizabeth Road, Nuneaton, main boundary road for Camp Hill adjoining to Tuttle Hill and Bucks Hill
England: Queen Elizabeth Bridge, A322 Windsor By-pass, Windsor
England: Queen Elizabeth II Metro Bridge, Tyne and Wear Metro, between Newcastle upon Tyne and Gateshead
England: Queensway, Birmingham
England: Queensway, Stevenage
England: Elizabeth Way, Hilperton, Wiltshire
England: Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford, Oxfordshire
England: Queen Elizabeth College, University of London, London
England: Queen Elizabeth II Silver Jubilee School, West Sussex
England: The Queen's Church of England Primary School, Kew, Surrey
England: Coronation Capsule, one of the capsules on the London Eye, London
England: London Underground's Jubilee line
England: Crossrail's Elizabeth line.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_things_named_after_Queen_Elizabeth_II
What about Sweaty Betty?
burfordTjustice
2017-05-01 10:22:47 UTC
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On Sun, 30 Apr 2017 09:48:12 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Things Named After The Current Queen
Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2017 09:48:12 -0700 (PDT)
User-Agent: G2/1.0
Newsgroups: uk.transport.london
lots of Cocks!
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