Discussion:
Tube strike
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Basil Jet
2017-01-24 23:07:44 UTC
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Central and Waterloo & City lines strike for 24hours from Wednesday night.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-38733015
Recliner
2017-01-24 23:34:06 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
Central and Waterloo & City lines strike for 24hours from Wednesday night.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-38733015
I see the RMT has picked another earth-shattering issue for this week's
political strike:
"The dispute centres around plans to transfer eight train operators between
Central line depots."
Basil Jet
2017-01-25 00:46:02 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Post by Basil Jet
Central and Waterloo & City lines strike for 24hours from Wednesday night.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-38733015
I see the RMT has picked another earth-shattering issue for this week's
"The dispute centres around plans to transfer eight train operators between
Central line depots."
I don't know the details, but if I lived in Barkingside and worked in
Hainault and my company transferred me to West Ruislip, I wouldn't be
too happy.
s***@potato.field
2017-01-25 09:31:25 UTC
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On Wed, 25 Jan 2017 00:46:02 +0000
Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
Post by Basil Jet
Central and Waterloo & City lines strike for 24hours from Wednesday night.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-38733015
I see the RMT has picked another earth-shattering issue for this week's
"The dispute centres around plans to transfer eight train operators between
Central line depots."
I don't know the details, but if I lived in Barkingside and worked in
Hainault and my company transferred me to West Ruislip, I wouldn't be
too happy.
If its in the job contract that you can be moved around depots - which
presumably it is or there would be a legal challenge - then tough shit. They
knew the conditions when they signed up and if they don't like it they can
always resign and go find another job that pays 50K for doing the square root
of fuck all most of the time.
--
Spud
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-01-25 12:37:24 UTC
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Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
Post by Basil Jet
Central and Waterloo & City lines strike for 24hours from Wednesday night.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-38733015
I see the RMT has picked another earth-shattering issue for this week's
"The dispute centres around plans to transfer eight train operators
between Central line depots."
I don't know the details, but if I lived in Barkingside and worked in
Hainault and my company transferred me to West Ruislip, I wouldn't be
too happy.
Is that what's happened though? If there ever was a case where talking is
better than striking this must be one.
--
Colin Rosenstiel
Recliner
2017-01-25 21:29:40 UTC
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Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
Post by Basil Jet
Central and Waterloo & City lines strike for 24hours from Wednesday night.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-38733015
I see the RMT has picked another earth-shattering issue for this week's
"The dispute centres around plans to transfer eight train operators
between Central line depots."
I don't know the details, but if I lived in Barkingside and worked in
Hainault and my company transferred me to West Ruislip, I wouldn't be
too happy.
Is that what's happened though? If there ever was a case where talking is
better than striking this must be one.
Apparently, according to BBC local news, they're being moved to Earls Court
(it's news to me that there's a Central line depot there).
Steve Fitzgerald
2017-01-28 14:21:12 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Post by Basil Jet
Central and Waterloo & City lines strike for 24hours from Wednesday night.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-38733015
I see the RMT has picked another earth-shattering issue for this week's
"The dispute centres around plans to transfer eight train operators between
Central line depots."
I'm not up to speed with the full details of the story (although as is
usual I've heard lots of different theories!) but this seems to stem
round a number of drivers being forced to another depot (Earls Court
TCD) after a number of years based at Leytonstone.

There are underlying issues with people who purposely chose an ATO depot
being forced to a manually driven line.

I'm not convinced that strike action by just one of the two unions
involved is very helpful to resolving the matter but that's the minority
union (as far as drivers are concerned) for you.
--
Steve Fitzgerald has now left the building.
You will find him in London's Docklands, E16, UK
(please use the reply to address for email)
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-01-25 00:34:00 UTC
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In article
Post by Recliner
Post by Basil Jet
Central and Waterloo & City lines strike for 24hours from Wednesday
night.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-38733015
I see the RMT has picked another earth-shattering issue for this week's
"The dispute centres around plans to transfer eight train operators
between Central line depots."
Are Cash & Co trying to drive their members out of work by gaining such a
reputation for bloody-mindedness?
--
Colin Rosenstiel
s***@potato.field
2017-01-25 09:29:03 UTC
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On Tue, 24 Jan 2017 18:34:00 -0600
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
In article
Post by Recliner
Post by Basil Jet
Central and Waterloo & City lines strike for 24hours from Wednesday
night.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-38733015
I see the RMT has picked another earth-shattering issue for this week's
"The dispute centres around plans to transfer eight train operators
between Central line depots."
Are Cash & Co trying to drive their members out of work by gaining such a
reputation for bloody-mindedness?
Its very reminiscent of Leyland back in the 70s. There needs to be a change
in the law to make the railway a special service (or whatever the term is) so
that strikes are outlawed and if there are any wildcat strikes then the
perpetrators can be sacked on the spot.
--
Spud
Recliner
2017-01-25 09:35:17 UTC
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Post by s***@potato.field
On Tue, 24 Jan 2017 18:34:00 -0600
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
In article
Post by Recliner
Post by Basil Jet
Central and Waterloo & City lines strike for 24hours from Wednesday
night.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-38733015
I see the RMT has picked another earth-shattering issue for this week's
"The dispute centres around plans to transfer eight train operators
between Central line depots."
Are Cash & Co trying to drive their members out of work by gaining such a
reputation for bloody-mindedness?
Its very reminiscent of Leyland back in the 70s. There needs to be a change
in the law to make the railway a special service (or whatever the term is) so
that strikes are outlawed and if there are any wildcat strikes then the
perpetrators can be sacked on the spot.
I don't know if it currently happens, but they should lose two days' pay
when a 24 hour strike spans, and therefore messes up, two working days, as
this one will.
s***@potato.field
2017-01-25 09:49:06 UTC
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On Wed, 25 Jan 2017 09:35:17 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Recliner
Post by s***@potato.field
Its very reminiscent of Leyland back in the 70s. There needs to be a change
in the law to make the railway a special service (or whatever the term is) so
that strikes are outlawed and if there are any wildcat strikes then the
perpetrators can be sacked on the spot.
I don't know if it currently happens, but they should lose two days' pay
when a 24 hour strike spans, and therefore messes up, two working days, as
this one will.
Sounds like a good idea to me.
--
Spud
Jarle Hammen Knudsen
2017-01-25 19:55:10 UTC
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On Wed, 25 Jan 2017 09:35:17 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
I don't know if it currently happens, but they should lose two days' pay
when a 24 hour strike spans, and therefore messes up, two working days, as
this one will.
Presumably they are compensated (if not in full) by the union's strike
fund.
--
jhk
Recliner
2017-01-26 00:36:26 UTC
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Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Wed, 25 Jan 2017 09:35:17 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
I don't know if it currently happens, but they should lose two days' pay
when a 24 hour strike spans, and therefore messes up, two working days, as
this one will.
Presumably they are compensated (if not in full) by the union's strike
fund.
Possibly, I'm not sure. But it would be good if the union's funds took more
of a hit from all of its political strikes.
Jarle Hammen Knudsen
2017-01-26 13:09:45 UTC
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On Thu, 26 Jan 2017 00:36:26 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Wed, 25 Jan 2017 09:35:17 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
I don't know if it currently happens, but they should lose two days' pay
when a 24 hour strike spans, and therefore messes up, two working days, as
this one will.
Presumably they are compensated (if not in full) by the union's strike
fund.
Possibly, I'm not sure. But it would be good if the union's funds took more
of a hit from all of its political strikes.
How much does union membership cost?

For Norwegian Transport Workers Union it's 1.7 % of wages plus NOK
229/month for various collective insurance policies.
--
jhk
David Cantrell
2017-01-27 12:23:59 UTC
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Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Thu, 26 Jan 2017 00:36:26 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
Possibly, I'm not sure. But it would be good if the union's funds took more
of a hit from all of its political strikes.
How much does union membership cost?
Depends on the union and usually varies with salary. Most allow people
to join online these days, so will presumably have their membership fees
online as they need to tell people how much before they charge them.
--
David Cantrell | http://www.cantrell.org.uk/david

More people are driven insane through religious hysteria than
by drinking alcohol. -- W C Fields
Recliner
2017-01-27 16:07:25 UTC
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Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Thu, 26 Jan 2017 00:36:26 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Wed, 25 Jan 2017 09:35:17 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
I don't know if it currently happens, but they should lose two days' pay
when a 24 hour strike spans, and therefore messes up, two working days, as
this one will.
Presumably they are compensated (if not in full) by the union's strike
fund.
See
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/12/14/union-paying-southern-rail-conductors-300-week-strike/
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
Post by Recliner
Possibly, I'm not sure. But it would be good if the union's funds took more
of a hit from all of its political strikes.
How much does union membership cost?
For Norwegian Transport Workers Union it's 1.7 % of wages plus NOK
229/month for various collective insurance policies.
The RMT fee is quite low:

Monthly

Full Rate - £20.67 (Basic salary or equivalent earnings is above £21,100
per annum)
Low Rate - £8.88 (Basic salary or equivalent earnings is below £21,100 per
annum)

See
http://www.rmt.org.uk/about/join-rmt/
tim...
2017-01-27 16:58:36 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Thu, 26 Jan 2017 00:36:26 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Wed, 25 Jan 2017 09:35:17 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
I don't know if it currently happens, but they should lose two days' pay
when a 24 hour strike spans, and therefore messes up, two working days, as
this one will.
Presumably they are compensated (if not in full) by the union's strike
fund.
See
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/12/14/union-paying-southern-rail-conductors-300-week-strike/
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
Post by Recliner
Possibly, I'm not sure. But it would be good if the union's funds took more
of a hit from all of its political strikes.
How much does union membership cost?
For Norwegian Transport Workers Union it's 1.7 % of wages plus NOK
229/month for various collective insurance policies.
Monthly
Full Rate - £20.67 (Basic salary or equivalent earnings is above £21,100
per annum)
what on earth is equivalent earnings?
Post by Recliner
Low Rate - £8.88 (Basic salary or equivalent earnings is below £21,100 per
annum)
hell that's quite a marginal "tax" rate at 21,101

14,000%

tim
Post by Recliner
See
http://www.rmt.org.uk/about/join-rmt/
David Cantrell
2017-01-30 15:56:09 UTC
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Post by tim...
Post by Recliner
Monthly
Full Rate - ??20.67 (Basic salary or equivalent earnings is above ??21,100
per annum)
what on earth is equivalent earnings?
Presumably it takes into account overtime pay.
Post by tim...
Post by Recliner
Low Rate - ??8.88 (Basic salary or equivalent earnings is below ??21,100 per
annum)
hell that's quite a marginal "tax" rate at 21,101
14,000%
You'll get things like that anywhere that uses a banded fee structure.

Other unions have more pay bands - mine has five, plus special rates for
members who are unemployed or retired - or just use a %age of earnings.
--
David Cantrell | Godless Liberal Elitist

All praise the Sun God
For He is a Fun God
Ra Ra Ra!
Steve Fitzgerald
2017-01-28 14:13:45 UTC
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Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Wed, 25 Jan 2017 09:35:17 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
I don't know if it currently happens, but they should lose two days' pay
when a 24 hour strike spans, and therefore messes up, two working days, as
this one will.
Presumably they are compensated (if not in full) by the union's strike
fund.
They get nothing from the union.
--
Steve Fitzgerald has now left the building.
You will find him in London's Docklands, E16, UK
(please use the reply to address for email)
Jarle Hammen Knudsen
2017-01-28 16:46:43 UTC
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On Sat, 28 Jan 2017 14:13:45 +0000, Steve Fitzgerald
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
Presumably they are compensated (if not in full) by the union's strike
fund.
They get nothing from the union.
Can you elaborate on why? I would say one of the main purposes of
unions is to make strikes financially possible for the individual.
--
jhk
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-01-28 18:01:44 UTC
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Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Sat, 28 Jan 2017 14:13:45 +0000, Steve Fitzgerald
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
Presumably they are compensated (if not in full) by the union's strike
fund.
They get nothing from the union.
Can you elaborate on why? I would say one of the main purposes of
unions is to make strikes financially possible for the individual.
That idea declined once union members ceased to be on poverty wages. Few
people in that sort of hole these days are union members.
--
Colin Rosenstiel
Richard J.
2017-01-25 10:30:23 UTC
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Post by s***@potato.field
On Tue, 24 Jan 2017 18:34:00 -0600
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
In article
Post by Recliner
Post by Basil Jet
Central and Waterloo & City lines strike for 24hours from Wednesday
night.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-38733015
I see the RMT has picked another earth-shattering issue for this week's
"The dispute centres around plans to transfer eight train operators
between Central line depots."
Are Cash & Co trying to drive their members out of work by gaining such a
reputation for bloody-mindedness?
Its very reminiscent of Leyland back in the 70s. There needs to be a change
in the law to make the railway a special service (or whatever the term is) so
that strikes are outlawed and if there are any wildcat strikes then the
perpetrators can be sacked on the spot.
In Paris, it's less draconian than that, but quite customer-friendly.
The arrangement is, I think, that they have to keep a proportion of the
trains running to provide a minimum level of service. So when there's a
strike on the Métro, RATP are able to announce in advance the expected
level of service during the strike, such as "1 train in 3". If there is
disruption on RER B, SNCF always run a shuttle service from Gare du Nord
to CDG airport to provide a minimum service to the airport. They even
have a dedicated website abcdtrains.com which is only used during major
disruption, usually strikes, to provide details of the emergency
timetable. It remembers the journey you asked about during the previous
strike.
--
Richard J.
(to email me, swap 'uk' and 'yon' in address)
Basil Jet
2017-01-25 12:36:00 UTC
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Post by Richard J.
In Paris, it's less draconian than that, but quite customer-friendly.
The arrangement is, I think, that they have to keep a proportion of the
trains running to provide a minimum level of service. So when there's a
strike on the Métro, RATP are able to announce in advance the expected
level of service during the strike, such as "1 train in 3". If there is
disruption on RER B, SNCF always run a shuttle service from Gare du Nord
to CDG airport to provide a minimum service to the airport. They even
have a dedicated website abcdtrains.com which is only used during major
disruption, usually strikes, to provide details of the emergency
timetable. It remembers the journey you asked about during the previous
strike.
I heard that French railway strikes involved running the trains as
normal but closing all the ticket offices and letting everyone travel
free. Was that a myth?
David Cantrell
2017-01-25 11:12:26 UTC
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Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Are Cash & Co trying to drive their members out of work by gaining such a
reputation for bloody-mindedness?
That's what it looks like, but I don't think it's actually the case.
They know full well that their industry is changing and that staffing
requirements aren't as high as they were in the Good Old Days. They're
just doing everything they can to delay it as much as possible.

See also the situation back during and after the switchover from steam
to diesel on BR that locomotives had a fireman - sorry, I mean a
"driver's assistant" - on board. The unions managed to keep that wheeze
going until the early 80s IIRC on the grounds that it was training for
future drivers.
--
David Cantrell | Minister for Arbitrary Justice

Human Rights left unattended may be removed,
destroyed, or damaged by the security services.
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-01-26 00:24:17 UTC
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In article
Post by Recliner
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
Post by Basil Jet
Central and Waterloo & City lines strike for 24hours from Wednesday
night.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-38733015
I see the RMT has picked another earth-shattering issue for this
"The dispute centres around plans to transfer eight train operators
between Central line depots."
I don't know the details, but if I lived in Barkingside and worked in
Hainault and my company transferred me to West Ruislip, I wouldn't be
too happy.
Is that what's happened though? If there ever was a case where
talking is better than striking this must be one.
Apparently, according to BBC local news, they're being moved to Earls
Court (it's news to me that there's a Central line depot there).
Or any other train crew facility for that matter.
--
Colin Rosenstiel
Recliner
2017-01-26 00:33:46 UTC
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Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
In article
Post by Recliner
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
Post by Basil Jet
Central and Waterloo & City lines strike for 24hours from Wednesday
night.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-38733015
I see the RMT has picked another earth-shattering issue for this
"The dispute centres around plans to transfer eight train operators
between Central line depots."
I don't know the details, but if I lived in Barkingside and worked in
Hainault and my company transferred me to West Ruislip, I wouldn't be
too happy.
Is that what's happened though? If there ever was a case where
talking is better than striking this must be one.
Apparently, according to BBC local news, they're being moved to Earls
Court (it's news to me that there's a Central line depot there).
Or any other train crew facility for that matter.
District line train crews change at Earls Court.

I note from the TfL status page that the Central line and Drain services
appear not to have been affected by the strike, both running a "good
service" well after the strike was due to start:
https://tfl.gov.uk/tube-dlr-overground/status/
Steve Fitzgerald
2017-01-28 14:15:39 UTC
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Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Recliner
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
I see the RMT has picked another earth-shattering issue for this
"The dispute centres around plans to transfer eight train operators
between Central line depots."
I don't know the details, but if I lived in Barkingside and worked in
Hainault and my company transferred me to West Ruislip, I wouldn't be
too happy.
Is that what's happened though? If there ever was a case where
talking is better than striking this must be one.
Apparently, according to BBC local news, they're being moved to Earls
Court (it's news to me that there's a Central line depot there).
Or any other train crew facility for that matter.
Actually there is. I'm based there!
--
Steve Fitzgerald has now left the building.
You will find him in London's Docklands, E16, UK
(please use the reply to address for email)
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-01-28 18:01:44 UTC
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Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Recliner
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
I see the RMT has picked another earth-shattering issue for this
"The dispute centres around plans to transfer eight train operators
between Central line depots."
I don't know the details, but if I lived in Barkingside and worked
in Hainault and my company transferred me to West Ruislip, I
wouldn't be too happy.
Is that what's happened though? If there ever was a case where
talking is better than striking this must be one.
Apparently, according to BBC local news, they're being moved to Earls
Court (it's news to me that there's a Central line depot there).
Or any other train crew facility for that matter.
Actually there is. I'm based there!
Whereabouts in the station complex? I've used Earl's Court since childhood
in the 1950s and I can't say I ever noticed anything.

At least it makes sense to base Piccadilly Line drivers (assuming you're
still one) there. It's hardly convenient for the Central Line though.
--
Colin Rosenstiel
Recliner
2017-01-28 20:59:15 UTC
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Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Recliner
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
I see the RMT has picked another earth-shattering issue for this
"The dispute centres around plans to transfer eight train operators
between Central line depots."
I don't know the details, but if I lived in Barkingside and worked
in Hainault and my company transferred me to West Ruislip, I
wouldn't be too happy.
Is that what's happened though? If there ever was a case where
talking is better than striking this must be one.
Apparently, according to BBC local news, they're being moved to Earls
Court (it's news to me that there's a Central line depot there).
Or any other train crew facility for that matter.
Actually there is. I'm based there!
Whereabouts in the station complex? I've used Earl's Court since childhood
in the 1950s and I can't say I ever noticed anything.
At least it makes sense to base Piccadilly Line drivers (assuming you're
still one) there. It's hardly convenient for the Central Line though.
I thought Steve said that they would be transferring to a non-ATO line, so
not the Central. I know District line drivers change at Earls Court, but
didn't know the same was true of the Piccadilly.
Steve Fitzgerald
2017-01-29 02:28:41 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Whereabouts in the station complex? I've used Earl's Court since childhood
in the 1950s and I can't say I ever noticed anything.
At least it makes sense to base Piccadilly Line drivers (assuming you're
still one) there. It's hardly convenient for the Central Line though.
I thought Steve said that they would be transferring to a non-ATO line, so
not the Central. I know District line drivers change at Earls Court, but
didn't know the same was true of the Piccadilly.
You're right, it isn't. The Picc has train crew depots at Cockfosters,
Arnos Grove, Acton and Northfields now.
--
Steve Fitzgerald has now left the building.
You will find him in London's Docklands, E16, UK
(please use the reply to address for email)
h***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-01-29 15:00:21 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Recliner
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
I see the RMT has picked another earth-shattering issue for this
"The dispute centres around plans to transfer eight train operators
between Central line depots."
I don't know the details, but if I lived in Barkingside and worked
in Hainault and my company transferred me to West Ruislip, I
wouldn't be too happy.
Is that what's happened though? If there ever was a case where
talking is better than striking this must be one.
Apparently, according to BBC local news, they're being moved to Earls
Court (it's news to me that there's a Central line depot there).
Or any other train crew facility for that matter.
Actually there is. I'm based there!
Whereabouts in the station complex? I've used Earl's Court since childhood
in the 1950s and I can't say I ever noticed anything.
At least it makes sense to base Piccadilly Line drivers (assuming you're
still one) there. It's hardly convenient for the Central Line though.
I thought Steve said that they would be transferring to a non-ATO line, so
not the Central. I know District line drivers change at Earls Court, but
didn't know the same was true of the Piccadilly.
Always thought that they changed at Acton Town.
Recliner
2017-01-29 15:32:49 UTC
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Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Recliner
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Recliner
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
I see the RMT has picked another earth-shattering issue for this
"The dispute centres around plans to transfer eight train operators
between Central line depots."
I don't know the details, but if I lived in Barkingside and worked
in Hainault and my company transferred me to West Ruislip, I
wouldn't be too happy.
Is that what's happened though? If there ever was a case where
talking is better than striking this must be one.
Apparently, according to BBC local news, they're being moved to Earls
Court (it's news to me that there's a Central line depot there).
Or any other train crew facility for that matter.
Actually there is. I'm based there!
Whereabouts in the station complex? I've used Earl's Court since childhood
in the 1950s and I can't say I ever noticed anything.
At least it makes sense to base Piccadilly Line drivers (assuming you're
still one) there. It's hardly convenient for the Central Line though.
I thought Steve said that they would be transferring to a non-ATO line, so
not the Central. I know District line drivers change at Earls Court, but
didn't know the same was true of the Piccadilly.
Always thought that they changed at Acton Town.
Yes, they do.
h***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-01-29 16:03:58 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Recliner
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Recliner
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
I see the RMT has picked another earth-shattering issue for this
"The dispute centres around plans to transfer eight train operators
between Central line depots."
I don't know the details, but if I lived in Barkingside and worked
in Hainault and my company transferred me to West Ruislip, I
wouldn't be too happy.
Is that what's happened though? If there ever was a case where
talking is better than striking this must be one.
Apparently, according to BBC local news, they're being moved to Earls
Court (it's news to me that there's a Central line depot there).
Or any other train crew facility for that matter.
Actually there is. I'm based there!
Whereabouts in the station complex? I've used Earl's Court since childhood
in the 1950s and I can't say I ever noticed anything.
At least it makes sense to base Piccadilly Line drivers (assuming you're
still one) there. It's hardly convenient for the Central Line though.
I thought Steve said that they would be transferring to a non-ATO line, so
not the Central. I know District line drivers change at Earls Court, but
didn't know the same was true of the Piccadilly.
Always thought that they changed at Acton Town.
Yes, they do.
Anyway, I am not clear on how there are any Central Line facilities at
Earl's Court.
Recliner
2017-01-29 16:38:44 UTC
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Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Recliner
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Recliner
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Recliner
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
I see the RMT has picked another earth-shattering issue for this
"The dispute centres around plans to transfer eight train operators
between Central line depots."
I don't know the details, but if I lived in Barkingside and worked
in Hainault and my company transferred me to West Ruislip, I
wouldn't be too happy.
Is that what's happened though? If there ever was a case where
talking is better than striking this must be one.
Apparently, according to BBC local news, they're being moved to Earls
Court (it's news to me that there's a Central line depot there).
Or any other train crew facility for that matter.
Actually there is. I'm based there!
Whereabouts in the station complex? I've used Earl's Court since childhood
in the 1950s and I can't say I ever noticed anything.
At least it makes sense to base Piccadilly Line drivers (assuming you're
still one) there. It's hardly convenient for the Central Line though.
I thought Steve said that they would be transferring to a non-ATO line, so
not the Central. I know District line drivers change at Earls Court, but
didn't know the same was true of the Piccadilly.
Always thought that they changed at Acton Town.
Yes, they do.
Anyway, I am not clear on how there are any Central Line facilities at
Earl's Court.
There aren't. As has been discussed in this thread, the only crew base at
Earls Court is for the District line.
Steve Fitzgerald
2017-01-29 02:27:11 UTC
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Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Or any other train crew facility for that matter.
Actually there is. I'm based there!
Whereabouts in the station complex? I've used Earl's Court since childhood
in the 1950s and I can't say I ever noticed anything.
At least it makes sense to base Piccadilly Line drivers (assuming you're
still one) there. It's hardly convenient for the Central Line though.
It's a District depot only (I moved there 5 years ago!). It's through a
door at the top of the stairs at the Warwick Road end of platforms 3/4.
It's a veritable Tardis with booking on point, and a canteen.

The depot has about 180 drivers and I think it's actually the largest on
the District.

I think this idea of the drivers being moved from the east to the west
of the Central has been confused with them being moved from the east to
the west of the Underground. I know we're due to get 6 drivers - in
fact they've arrived and commenced training.
--
Steve Fitzgerald has now left the building.
You will find him in London's Docklands, E16, UK
(please use the reply to address for email)
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-01-29 11:05:05 UTC
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Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Or any other train crew facility for that matter.
Actually there is. I'm based there!
Whereabouts in the station complex? I've used Earl's Court since
childhood in the 1950s and I can't say I ever noticed anything.
At least it makes sense to base Piccadilly Line drivers (assuming you're
still one) there. It's hardly convenient for the Central Line though.
It's a District depot only (I moved there 5 years ago!). It's
through a door at the top of the stairs at the Warwick Road end of
platforms 3/4. It's a veritable Tardis with booking on point, and a
canteen.
That could explain it. As a Putney boy I rarely went to that end of
platforms 3 & 4. The East Putney exit is towards the back of trains.
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
The depot has about 180 drivers and I think it's actually the largest
on the District.
I think this idea of the drivers being moved from the east to the
west of the Central has been confused with them being moved from the
east to the west of the Underground. I know we're due to get 6
drivers - in fact they've arrived and commenced training.
Still a problem for drivers living near Hainault to have to move across to
Earls Court to book on every shift.
--
Colin Rosenstiel
Robin
2017-01-29 12:06:05 UTC
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Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Still a problem for drivers living near Hainault to have to move across to
Earls Court to book on every shift.
Many employees face relocation every year. Most employers try to
minimise the effects by eg asking for volunteers; and by providing eg
relocation expenses or excess fares allowances. Many employees still
don't like it. But, if their contract of employment requires mobility
and they have not been given any legitimate expectations that it will
never be required, then they have the usual choice: move or resign.
What is unclear is what makes the position of the 8 tube drivers so
different that their union supports strike action. Possibly the fact
that the union knows know their employer can't go bust leaving their
members with no jobs at all?
--
Robin
reply-to address is (intended to be) valid
Clank
2017-01-29 12:54:10 UTC
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Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Or any other train crew facility for that matter.
Actually there is. I'm based there!
Whereabouts in the station complex? I've used Earl's Court since
childhood in the 1950s and I can't say I ever noticed anything.
At least it makes sense to base Piccadilly Line drivers (assuming you're
still one) there. It's hardly convenient for the Central Line though.
It's a District depot only (I moved there 5 years ago!). It's
through a door at the top of the stairs at the Warwick Road end of
platforms 3/4. It's a veritable Tardis with booking on point, and a
canteen.
That could explain it. As a Putney boy I rarely went to that end of
platforms 3 & 4. The East Putney exit is towards the back of trains.
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
The depot has about 180 drivers and I think it's actually the largest
on the District.
I think this idea of the drivers being moved from the east to the
west of the Central has been confused with them being moved from the
east to the west of the Underground. I know we're due to get 6
drivers - in fact they've arrived and commenced training.
Still a problem for drivers living near Hainault to have to move across to
Earls Court to book on every shift.
How is that different from every other Londoner who has to commute across
the city for their job?
Recliner
2017-01-29 13:32:59 UTC
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On Sun, 29 Jan 2017 12:54:10 -0000 (UTC), Clank
Post by Clank
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Or any other train crew facility for that matter.
Actually there is. I'm based there!
Whereabouts in the station complex? I've used Earl's Court since
childhood in the 1950s and I can't say I ever noticed anything.
At least it makes sense to base Piccadilly Line drivers (assuming you're
still one) there. It's hardly convenient for the Central Line though.
It's a District depot only (I moved there 5 years ago!). It's
through a door at the top of the stairs at the Warwick Road end of
platforms 3/4. It's a veritable Tardis with booking on point, and a
canteen.
That could explain it. As a Putney boy I rarely went to that end of
platforms 3 & 4. The East Putney exit is towards the back of trains.
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
The depot has about 180 drivers and I think it's actually the largest
on the District.
I think this idea of the drivers being moved from the east to the
west of the Central has been confused with them being moved from the
east to the west of the Underground. I know we're due to get 6
drivers - in fact they've arrived and commenced training.
Still a problem for drivers living near Hainault to have to move across to
Earls Court to book on every shift.
How is that different from every other Londoner who has to commute across
the city for their job?
One difference: the LU part of the commute would presumably be free
for Tube drivers.

I wonder if they would also be allowed to book on their shifts at a
base at the eastern end of the District line?
Steve Fitzgerald
2017-01-29 14:00:16 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Post by Clank
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Still a problem for drivers living near Hainault to have to move across to
Earls Court to book on every shift.
How is that different from every other Londoner who has to commute across
the city for their job?
One difference: the LU part of the commute would presumably be free
for Tube drivers.
I wonder if they would also be allowed to book on their shifts at a
base at the eastern end of the District line?
Only if they were deemed as being based at either Upminster or Barking
and work shifts from there.

Both depots have a long waiting list to go there (I know as I'm on the
Barking list) so there will be no vacancies for them to fill (which is
the point of the move in the first place).
--
Steve Fitzgerald has now left the building.
You will find him in London's Docklands, E16, UK
(please use the reply to address for email)
Roland Perry
2017-01-29 20:41:14 UTC
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Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Only if they were deemed as being based at either Upminster or Barking
and work shifts from there.
Both depots have a long waiting list to go there (I know as I'm on the
Barking list)
Do you have to be mad to ask for that?
--
Roland Perry
h***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-01-29 23:13:26 UTC
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Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Only if they were deemed as being based at either Upminster or Barking
and work shifts from there.
Both depots have a long waiting list to go there (I know as I'm on the
Barking list)
I understand that the list for the Metropolitan Line is also quite long.
Steve Fitzgerald
2017-01-30 13:32:38 UTC
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Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Only if they were deemed as being based at either Upminster or Barking
and work shifts from there.
Both depots have a long waiting list to go there (I know as I'm on the
Barking list)
I understand that the list for the Metropolitan Line is also quite long.
Rickmansworth definitely, I'm not sure that Harrow and Neasden are that
long these days.
--
Steve Fitzgerald has now left the building.
You will find him in London's Docklands, E16, UK
(please use the reply to address for email)
h***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-01-30 17:28:07 UTC
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Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Only if they were deemed as being based at either Upminster or Barking
and work shifts from there.
Both depots have a long waiting list to go there (I know as I'm on the
Barking list)
I understand that the list for the Metropolitan Line is also quite long.
Rickmansworth definitely, I'm not sure that Harrow and Neasden are that
long these days.
Dead man's shoes anywhere on that line, is what one driver told me.
Steve Fitzgerald
2017-01-30 13:30:55 UTC
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Post by Roland Perry
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Only if they were deemed as being based at either Upminster or Barking
and work shifts from there.
Both depots have a long waiting list to go there (I know as I'm on the
Barking list)
Do you have to be mad to ask for that?
Probably!

As it's 10 mins from home (as the motorbike flys) it would be silly not
to be based there.

The question is do I retire or transfer first?
--
Steve Fitzgerald has now left the building.
You will find him in London's Docklands, E16, UK
(please use the reply to address for email)
Basil Jet
2017-01-29 22:01:14 UTC
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I'm on the Barking list
Ain't that the truth! ;-)
David Cantrell
2017-01-30 16:03:49 UTC
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Post by Clank
How is that different from every other Londoner who has to commute across
the city for their job?
But if you take a job that involves a commute you know that when you
accept the job offer. In this case the staff are having their place of
work changed after they started, to one that may involve a much longer
commute.

The last time an employer did that to me I just resigned, but then, I
have rather more transferrable skills than yer average train driver. If
I had a choice of move with the same employer, or, errm, resign and have
to move for a new employer anyway, then I'd be quite miffed. As it is,
I'm lucky enough to have the option of resigning and *not* moving to
find a new employer.

The RMT and ASLEF are almost always unreasonable, but it seems that in
this case they might have a point. It depends, I suppose, on how LU are
treating the drivers who are being asked to move.
--
David Cantrell | London Perl Mongers Deputy Chief Heretic

I hate baby seals. They get asked to all the best clubs.
Recliner
2017-01-30 16:09:19 UTC
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Post by David Cantrell
Post by Clank
How is that different from every other Londoner who has to commute across
the city for their job?
But if you take a job that involves a commute you know that when you
accept the job offer. In this case the staff are having their place of
work changed after they started, to one that may involve a much longer
commute.
The last time an employer did that to me I just resigned, but then, I
have rather more transferrable skills than yer average train driver. If
I had a choice of move with the same employer, or, errm, resign and have
to move for a new employer anyway, then I'd be quite miffed. As it is,
I'm lucky enough to have the option of resigning and *not* moving to
find a new employer.
The RMT and ASLEF are almost always unreasonable, but it seems that in
this case they might have a point. It depends, I suppose, on how LU are
treating the drivers who are being asked to move.
If your employer asks you to move more than certain distance, don't you
have the automatic right to treat it as redundancy?
Robin
2017-01-31 10:45:18 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Post by David Cantrell
Post by Clank
How is that different from every other Londoner who has to commute across
the city for their job?
But if you take a job that involves a commute you know that when you
accept the job offer. In this case the staff are having their place of
work changed after they started, to one that may involve a much longer
commute.
The last time an employer did that to me I just resigned, but then, I
have rather more transferrable skills than yer average train driver. If
I had a choice of move with the same employer, or, errm, resign and have
to move for a new employer anyway, then I'd be quite miffed. As it is,
I'm lucky enough to have the option of resigning and *not* moving to
find a new employer.
The RMT and ASLEF are almost always unreasonable, but it seems that in
this case they might have a point. It depends, I suppose, on how LU are
treating the drivers who are being asked to move.
If your employer asks you to move more than certain distance, don't you
have the automatic right to treat it as redundancy?
Depends on the terms of your contract of employment and anything which
may have modified that - eg by giving you legitimate expectations of not
being moved (or moved that far).

Many national firms and public sector bodies (eg the civil service)
still have national mobility clauses for higher paid staff (such as tube
drivers) and for lower paid mobility within reasonable commuting
distances. And they do enforce those requirements.

And while I know the RMT argue there are no excess staff, if TfL are
right that there are 8 excess staff at Leytonstone and vacancies at
Earls Court what else should TfL do? Pay the drivers to do nothing?
Count their travel time from Leytonstone to Earls Court as working time
in perpetuity? Stuff their mouths with gold? Bear in mind that what
they do this time may well create a legally binding precedent for what
they can and can't do with future surpluses.
--
Robin
reply-to address is (intended to be) valid
s***@potato.field
2017-01-31 11:01:17 UTC
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On Tue, 31 Jan 2017 10:45:18 +0000
Post by Robin
Post by Recliner
Post by David Cantrell
Post by Clank
How is that different from every other Londoner who has to commute across
the city for their job?
But if you take a job that involves a commute you know that when you
accept the job offer. In this case the staff are having their place of
work changed after they started, to one that may involve a much longer
commute.
The last time an employer did that to me I just resigned, but then, I
have rather more transferrable skills than yer average train driver. If
I had a choice of move with the same employer, or, errm, resign and have
to move for a new employer anyway, then I'd be quite miffed. As it is,
I'm lucky enough to have the option of resigning and *not* moving to
find a new employer.
The RMT and ASLEF are almost always unreasonable, but it seems that in
this case they might have a point. It depends, I suppose, on how LU are
treating the drivers who are being asked to move.
If your employer asks you to move more than certain distance, don't you
have the automatic right to treat it as redundancy?
Depends on the terms of your contract of employment and anything which
may have modified that - eg by giving you legitimate expectations of not
being moved (or moved that far).
I don't think anyone is going to be able to claim that being moved around
London counts as being moved far, especially given there are company supplied
taxis. The whole thing is just more whinging from overpaid lazy bastards.
--
Spud
David Cantrell
2017-02-01 11:55:13 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Post by David Cantrell
The RMT and ASLEF are almost always unreasonable, but it seems that in
this case they might have a point. It depends, I suppose, on how LU are
treating the drivers who are being asked to move.
If your employer asks you to move more than certain distance, don't you
have the automatic right to treat it as redundancy?
Even if you do, what counts as a reasonable distance in one place might
not be reasonable in another. Whether the staff affected think it's
reasonable will depend on travel time (and cost), whether public
transport is available at the necessary times, and so on.
--
David Cantrell | Enforcer, South London Linguistic Massive

While researching this email, I was forced to carry out some
investigative work which unfortunately involved a bucket of
puppies and a belt sander
-- after JoeB, in the Monastery
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-02-01 21:25:45 UTC
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Post by David Cantrell
Post by Recliner
Post by David Cantrell
The RMT and ASLEF are almost always unreasonable, but it seems that in
this case they might have a point. It depends, I suppose, on how LU
are treating the drivers who are being asked to move.
If your employer asks you to move more than certain distance, don't you
have the automatic right to treat it as redundancy?
Even if you do, what counts as a reasonable distance in one place might
not be reasonable in another. Whether the staff affected think it's
reasonable will depend on travel time (and cost), whether public
transport is available at the necessary times, and so on.
Is this week's strike, which is predicted to be much more disruptive, about
the same issue?
--
Colin Rosenstiel
Recliner
2017-02-01 21:43:28 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by David Cantrell
Post by Recliner
Post by David Cantrell
The RMT and ASLEF are almost always unreasonable, but it seems that in
this case they might have a point. It depends, I suppose, on how LU
are treating the drivers who are being asked to move.
If your employer asks you to move more than certain distance, don't you
have the automatic right to treat it as redundancy?
Even if you do, what counts as a reasonable distance in one place might
not be reasonable in another. Whether the staff affected think it's
reasonable will depend on travel time (and cost), whether public
transport is available at the necessary times, and so on.
Is this week's strike, which is predicted to be much more disruptive, about
the same issue?
Actually, next week's strike. No, this is another one about the closed
ticket offices, which aren't going to reopen. If it's like the last of its
type, most lines will have a service, but few zone 1 stations will be open.
Trains will run non-stop through them at low speed.
Steve Fitzgerald
2017-02-02 01:24:22 UTC
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Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by David Cantrell
Even if you do, what counts as a reasonable distance in one place might
not be reasonable in another. Whether the staff affected think it's
reasonable will depend on travel time (and cost), whether public
transport is available at the necessary times, and so on.
Is this week's strike, which is predicted to be much more disruptive, about
the same issue?
No.

This is the RMT/TSSA's ongoing issue over station redundancies.
--
Steve Fitzgerald has now left the building.
You will find him in London's Docklands, E16, UK
(please use the reply to address for email)
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-01-26 01:00:35 UTC
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In article
Post by Recliner
Post by Jarle Hammen Knudsen
On Wed, 25 Jan 2017 09:35:17 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Recliner
I don't know if it currently happens, but they should lose two days'
pay when a 24 hour strike spans, and therefore messes up, two working
days, as this one will.
Presumably they are compensated (if not in full) by the union's strike
fund.
Possibly, I'm not sure. But it would be good if the union's funds took
more of a hit from all of its political strikes.
I don't think strikers get much from strike funds these days. That's why
all-out strikes have all but died out.
--
Colin Rosenstiel
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-01-29 18:12:22 UTC
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In article
Post by Recliner
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Recliner
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Recliner
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Recliner
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by Basil Jet
Post by Recliner
I see the RMT has picked another earth-shattering issue for
"The dispute centres around plans to transfer eight train
operators between Central line depots."
I don't know the details, but if I lived in Barkingside and
worked in Hainault and my company transferred me to West
Ruislip, I wouldn't be too happy.
Is that what's happened though? If there ever was a case where
talking is better than striking this must be one.
Apparently, according to BBC local news, they're being moved to
Earls Court (it's news to me that there's a Central line depot
there).
Or any other train crew facility for that matter.
Actually there is. I'm based there!
Whereabouts in the station complex? I've used Earl's Court since
childhood in the 1950s and I can't say I ever noticed anything.
At least it makes sense to base Piccadilly Line drivers (assuming
you're still one) there. It's hardly convenient for the Central Line
though.
I thought Steve said that they would be transferring to a non-ATO
line, so not the Central. I know District line drivers change at
Earls Court, but didn't know the same was true of the Piccadilly.
Always thought that they changed at Acton Town.
Yes, they do.
Anyway, I am not clear on how there are any Central Line facilities
at Earl's Court.
There aren't. As has been discussed in this thread, the only crew base at
Earls Court is for the District line.
So, a transfer from Central (Hainault) to the District would be reasonable
enough if it involved signing on east of Aldgate. Earls Court sounds less
reasonable unless it was intended to be short term before transfer to the
eastern end of the line. Sounds like a real failure somewhere for this not
to have been resolved by negotiation.
--
Colin Rosenstiel
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-02-02 00:25:08 UTC
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In article
Post by Recliner
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by David Cantrell
Post by Recliner
Post by David Cantrell
The RMT and ASLEF are almost always unreasonable, but it seems that
in this case they might have a point. It depends, I suppose, on how
LU are treating the drivers who are being asked to move.
If your employer asks you to move more than certain distance, don't
you have the automatic right to treat it as redundancy?
Even if you do, what counts as a reasonable distance in one place might
not be reasonable in another. Whether the staff affected think it's
reasonable will depend on travel time (and cost), whether public
transport is available at the necessary times, and so on.
Is this week's strike, which is predicted to be much more
disruptive, about the same issue?
Actually, next week's strike. No, this is another one about the closed
ticket offices, which aren't going to reopen. If it's like the last of its
type, most lines will have a service, but few zone 1 stations will be
open. Trains will run non-stop through them at low speed.
Thanks. I'd forgotten about that dispute. It's not just about ticket offices
but also about station staffing where it seems to me that the unions have a
point.
--
Colin Rosenstiel
Recliner
2017-02-02 01:12:49 UTC
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Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
In article
Post by Recliner
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by David Cantrell
Post by Recliner
Post by David Cantrell
The RMT and ASLEF are almost always unreasonable, but it seems that
in this case they might have a point. It depends, I suppose, on how
LU are treating the drivers who are being asked to move.
If your employer asks you to move more than certain distance, don't
you have the automatic right to treat it as redundancy?
Even if you do, what counts as a reasonable distance in one place might
not be reasonable in another. Whether the staff affected think it's
reasonable will depend on travel time (and cost), whether public
transport is available at the necessary times, and so on.
Is this week's strike, which is predicted to be much more
disruptive, about the same issue?
Actually, next week's strike. No, this is another one about the closed
ticket offices, which aren't going to reopen. If it's like the last of its
type, most lines will have a service, but few zone 1 stations will be
open. Trains will run non-stop through them at low speed.
Thanks. I'd forgotten about that dispute. It's not just about ticket offices
but also about station staffing where it seems to me that the unions have a
point.
Yes, they probably do, but 200 more station staff are being recruited, so I
don't see why they're still striking.

From
<http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/tube-strike-london-underground-station-staff-24-hour-walkout-shortage-zone-1-central-rmt-a7516776.html>

Steve Griffiths, London Underground chief operating officer, said the
transit operator has agreed to hire hundreds of new station staff.

"There is no need to strike,” he said. “We had always intended to review
staffing levels and have had constructive discussions with the unions.

"We agree that we need more staff in our stations and have already started
to recruit 200 extra staff."
r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
2017-02-02 12:12:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
In article
Post by Recliner
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
In article
Post by Recliner
Post by r***@cix.compulink.co.uk
Post by David Cantrell
Post by Recliner
Post by David Cantrell
The RMT and ASLEF are almost always unreasonable, but it seems that
in this case they might have a point. It depends, I suppose, on how
LU are treating the drivers who are being asked to move.
If your employer asks you to move more than certain distance, don't
you have the automatic right to treat it as redundancy?
Even if you do, what counts as a reasonable distance in one place
might not be reasonable in another. Whether the staff affected think
it's reasonable will depend on travel time (and cost), whether public
transport is available at the necessary times, and so on.
Is this week's strike, which is predicted to be much more
disruptive, about the same issue?
Actually, next week's strike. No, this is another one about the closed
ticket offices, which aren't going to reopen. If it's like the last of
its type, most lines will have a service, but few zone 1 stations will
be open. Trains will run non-stop through them at low speed.
Thanks. I'd forgotten about that dispute. It's not just about
ticket offices but also about station staffing where it seems to me
that the unions have a point.
Yes, they probably do, but 200 more station staff are being recruited, so
I don't see why they're still striking.
From
<http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/tube-strike-london-undergroun
d-station-staff-24-hour-walkout-shortage-zone-1-central-rmt-a7516776.html>
Post by Recliner
Steve Griffiths, London Underground chief operating officer, said the
transit operator has agreed to hire hundreds of new station staff.
"There is no need to strike,_ he said. _We had always intended to review
staffing levels and have had constructive discussions with the unions.
"We agree that we need more staff in our stations and have already started
to recruit 200 extra staff."
Oh yes. I didn't say the strike was a justified response.
--
Colin Rosenstiel
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